Category Archives: Off-Duty

Big 10 and Pac-12 Teams Shouldn’t Be Eligible for Championship

Since I’ve enjoyed a watching some really great college football games this weekend – including watching my Aggies upset the Florida Gators – it really annoys me that the Big 10 and Pac 12 are starting their truncated seasons nearly a full month after the other conferences, will play fewer games, but are still eligible for the national championship playoffs. Injuries and weariness weigh heavily in the playoffs of any sports league. It is rarely the best team at the beginning of the season that wins it all. It’s usually the team that has the best players left playing at the end of the season. In this case, teams like Ohio State will end their season with two or more fewer games than the teams they might be playing. When the Big 10 and Pac 12 decided to not have a season, they should have been excluded from playoff contention. The fact that they decided to have a season after all is good for their players and their schools, but they made their choice.

On another note, I think I like the teams playing only conference games. Every game matters and there are much fewer lopsided games.

Murder Hornets Near Slaughter Phase

Well then

“Asian giant hornets this time of year start going into what we call the slaughter phase,” said Sven-Erik Spichiger, an entomologist at the Washington state department of agriculture.

In this phase, the hornets launch attacks on honeybee colonies, decapitating workers and dividing up their bodies as food for their young. The prospect is worrisome for farmers who rely on the bees to pollinate key crops, such as blueberries and raspberries.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Remodel nearly complete at Washington House

The remodel of the tavern in a landmark location in West Bend started just a couple months ago and over the past few weeks a noticeable transformation has taken place.  How long did it take you to pinpoint the location?

The building at 228 N. Sixth Avenue in West Bend is listed in the National Register of Historic Properties.

From the book The Story of Washington County by Carl Quickert there was a brief mention of Baltazar Goetter.

“B. Goetter who in the spring of 1849 opened up the first brewery and later erected the “Washington House,” one of the largest and finest hotels in the State at the time, and for many years the preferred rendezvous of the German pioneers.”

From the sign out front of the cream city brick building.

“This building was one of the first brick building erected in West Bend. It was built in 1849 by Baltazar Goetter. It replaced a wooden hotel built in 1852.  That building was destroyed by fire on January 1, 1864.

The Italianate structure reopened October 15, 1864 as a headquarters for travelers along the “Old Stage Coach Road” serving coach and ox-cart alike.

The book The Spirit of West Bend by Dorothy E. Williams has a section on the hotel fire involving the Washington House.

“Perhaps the most dramatic moment in the life of the Washington House occurred on January 1, 1864. It was a severely cold day, as New Year’s days usually are. Every room o fthe hotel was filled. The many stoves were crammed full of wood to ward off the frigid air, and inside in the cheery atmosphere the men played billiards, cards, or told stories to while away the holiday.

Suddenly the dread cry of “FIRE!” brought everyone to his feet. The roof was a fire! Instantly, townspeople and guests set to work to save what they could. There was no local fire department as yet, and the only equipment the village had was a “donkey engine” with 20 feet of hose, entirely inadequate to reach the river, which at any rate was frozen solid. Willing hands pitched blankets, beds, pitchers, washbasins, luggage, and looking glasses from the upper floors to the frozen ground below. After the entire first floor was cleared, men went into the cellar to rescue the sauerkraut jar and carried the heavy burden all the way up the steps and outside to safety.

Other helpers managed to carry out the cumbrous hotel range, with the holiday turkey still in the oven. The turkey promptly froze. Most of the food in the basement was well enough insulated so it did not freeze – the apples, potatoes, etc. When it was all over, the only item remaining on the spot where the hotel had been was the cast iron stove which had overheated and probably caused the terrible conflagration. There is no record of where the guests spent the rest of the day, but probably the townspeople took them in.

 

Almost at once Mr. Goetter began to rebuild, this time a three-story cream-colored brick building of local clay that rivaled the famed Crem City brick from Milwaukee, according to local observers. It could accommodate 100 guests and was ready for occupancy by October 15 of that same year. By this time West Bend had its own cabinet maker, Mr. Roecker, who made some of the furniture for the new rooms.

Many famous Americans have stayed at the Washington House including William Jennings Bryan, William Barkley (Vice President), and John F. Kennedy and it is the oldest business left in the city, having celebrated both the centennial and bicentennial.

West Bend School District responds to social media post about students and face masks

A note of clarification regarding face masks in the West Bend School District. There was recently a post on social media about face masks that claimed middle school students in the West Bend School District were being asked to remove some political masks and not others.

Superintendent Jen Wimmer was asked about the allegations regarding the masks and responded.

“We have been made aware of a person posting information on a local Facebook group page that alleges a staff member at Badger Middle School told a student to remove a face mask because it featured a political candidate. The Badger administrative team, supported by our Director of Human Resources, is conducting a thorough investigation.

As that investigation takes place, families and the community can be assured that the West Bend School District believes students have the right to exercise non offensive and non-disruptive free speech. Supporting a political candidate or advocating for a group (i.e. BLM, Blue Lives, flag, military, etc. as Ms. Kellom notes) is allowed in our schools. There is no policy or practice that would discourage this (unless as part of that message it included offensive language or imagery).”

Wimmer said, “Thank you for reaching out and helping to correct public perception regarding our practice. Again, we support our students’ rights to express themselves in a non-offensive and non-disruptive manner.”

An email from the district’s communications manager Nancy Kunkler initially denied the incident took place. “The person also alleges the students in the West Bend School District cannot wear anything that supports police. The incident the person described did not take place; no one at Badger Middle School was told to remove a mask with a political or election-related matter.”

Parents of the students involved in the incident have contacted WashingtonCountyInsider.com and confirmed it was a male teacher that confronted the student and requested that a mask supporting President Donald Trump be removed. The parent of the girl who reported the incident said it occurred in the hallway on the third floor.

Below is the original post from Facebook and Sue Kellom.

“I learned today that students at the Badger School are not allowed to wear any Trump mask and were asked to remove them as they were “Offensive” however BLM mask are allowed. I’m so sick of this double standard BS! You can have a School named after Barack Obama but Trump is offensive!?

I encourage everyone to write an email or call the West Bend School District to stop this discrimination. I understand political things however if you allow BLM then you also need to allow Blue Lives Matter, Military Lives matter, Trump mask and the American Flag mask.”

National Life Chain is Sunday, October 4 in Hartford          By Terese Hummel

The annual, national Life Chain event returns to Hartford and West Bend on Sunday, October 4, 2020. Beginning at 2 p.m., pro-life individuals and families from Washington County will gather at the east parking lot of Willowbrook Park and spread out along Highway 60 (E. Sumner Street) in Hartford. There will also be a gathering at 2 p.m. at the corner of Paradise Drive and S. Main Street.

Held each year on the first Sunday of October, Life Chain is a legal, peaceful, quiet display of people in our area communities gathering to publicly and silently state that there are alternatives to abortion and healing is possible.

There are no disturbing images for passing motorists, only thought-provoking statements including “Adoption, the Loving Option,” “Jesus Forgives and Heals,” and “Pregnant? Need Help? 800-712-HELP.”

The display will line Highway 60 in Hartford until 3:30 p.m., in unison with other Life Chains across the country. From its small beginnings as a local witness in Southern California, the Life Chain has spread to more than 2,000 cities all over North America. The first Sunday of each October is National Life Chain Sunday.

We believe it is time for the Church to fight for the unborn with spiritual weapons. The battle for life will not be won in the courtroom or the voting booth until it is first won in prayer. We call for pastors to lead the Church in repentance for our nation. When God’s people humble themselves, pray, seek His face, and turn from their own ways, we believe that God will hear from heaven, forgive our sins, and heal our land (2 Chronicles 7:14-15).

Uniform signs will be available free of charge on October 4 at Willowbrook Park’s east parking lot. On the back of each sign, participants will find Scripture and praise-and-hymn lyrics.

For more information, please contact Terese Hummel at 262-689-3742

Log home in Town of Wayne lost to fire

A dire house fire over the weekend in the Town of Wayne went from bad to worse. On Saturday, September 19, 2020 at approximately 10:38 p.m. a dozen fire departments responded to a house on fire at 9115 Woodlawn Drive.

After the fire was extinguished the Washington County Sheriff shared photos of the damage. See video below. But then on Sunday the logs in the home that dates to 1902 held in so much heat the fire started again. Firefighters bought in an excavator and leveled the historic home.

Homeowner Michael Ziegelbauer was devastated by the fire.

On Monday, he stood in the middle of the charred remains. “I had just finished remodeling a couple rooms,” he said.

Ziegelbauer, 29, was at a loss.

The two-story had once been home to Orville and Ruth Kern. They owned it from 1948 until 2006.

“We bought the property when we got married,” said Ruth. “We bought it for $700. We used every bit of money we had.”

Ruth, who now lives in Kewaskum, farmed the land with her husband and raised six children.

“The kids had this painted for me,” said Ruth about the picture of the old homestead. “The log home has been cleaned up a bit. This is when it had windows added and we had a man name Muckerheide level off the front yard.”

Ruth met Orville at a bar. “I was with somebody else,” she said. “They introduced us and he asked me out. We dated for a year and a half and then got married. I was 19 years old.”

“Orville was so kindhearted, a wonderful guy. He was town clerk for 25 years,” she said.

Ruth and Orville worked hard and spruced the place up when they could afford it.

“Our windowsills were really deep,” said Ruth holding her hands more than a foot apart. “Everybody envied it. We remodeled the whole thing… little by little.”

Orville built a new outhouse and installed plumbing. “My husband dug a well by hand; we didn’t have running water. The first thing we did was build a toilet and then when we had money we put in hot water.”

“We had a wood heater and that pipe from the wood heater would heat the living room too,” she said. “We wallpapered the upstairs because the plaster was bad. Even when I sold the place the real estate agent said that was pretty wallpaper.”

“I worked for George Hess, personnel manager at West Bend Aluminum Company. I worked there until we got married and then my husband didn’t want me to work because he said it didn’t work when we live on the farm but we sure could have used the money.”

The Kerns lost their first child, a girl, when she was 20 weeks old. “She had a heart condition,” said Ruth. “After that we had three girls and three boys.”

Ruth recalled the good times and bad on Woodlawn Drive. The ice storm from 1976 and when the fire department brought a generator so the milk would not freeze. “We bought seven cows,” said Ruth.

The cash crops are where the Kerns made a lot of money. “We had sweet corn and field corn and peas,” she said.

The fire departments that assisted in the fire call were Kewaskum, West Bend, Theresa, Lomira, Allenton, Boltonville, St. Lawrence, Slinger, Knowles, and Eden Fire Departments.

Baskin Robbins / Dunkin’ staff training to begin as opening nears

The address, 1610 W. Washington Street, has now been posted in the window at the new Baskin Robbins / Dunkin’ store in West Bend.

Construction got underway June 10, 2020 in the lot formerly home to Pizza Hut. “We’re hoping for a late October opening for our new Dunkin’ and Baskin restaurant in West Bend,” said owner Emily Kettinger.

“Equipment will be coming in early October and then it’s just getting everything installed and the final touches coordinated. Hopefully, we’ll be training new staff in the coming weeks.”

The 2,160-square-foot property is nearly complete as signage is expected in the coming weeks and the parking lot will be paved.

Neighbors have been eagerly anticipating the opening of the ice cream store and coffee shop. This is the second time West Bend will be home to a Baskin Robbins 31 Flavors. In 1974 Ken and Shirley Leisman opened the first Baskin Robbins in the West Bend Plaza.

“It was by the old Kohl’s Food Store in the mall on Main Street,” said Kathy Leisman Suchon, the daughter of the owners. “On the other end of the mall was Alston’s clothing store and we were right in that middle by the garden area on the right-hand side. I remember the whole front and side of the store were all windows.”

Suchon also remembered a Ben Franklin in the strip mall and RadioShack, 842. S Main Street.

Suchon said her parents got into the ice cream business because they really wanted to do something together. “They thought what is better than an ice cream parlor that brings families together and everyone is happy when they get ice cream and they just thought it would be really fun,” she said.

Outdoor Fun at Fall Harvest Fest

Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 6869 Wildwood Road in West Bend, invites the community to attend Fall Harvest Fest, Saturday, October 17, outside on the church property from 1 – 4 p.m. Guests are encouraged to come in costume. This event is free and open to the public.

A variety of family activities are planned. Trunk or Treat will be set up on the top tier of the parking lot where treats will be handed out. Nearby a craft tent will be available for a make and take craft kit (parental supervision required). Following a map of hidden clues, children can venture out on a scavenger hunt. Then kids can kick a few balls at the soccer station while learning about an upcoming soccer camp.

Other activities for the day include a free hot dog lunch while supplies last. Praise band Unworthy will play Christian cover songs from 2 p.m.– 3 p.m. Bingo for adults and kids, with prizes will round out the fun from 3 – 4 p.m.

A contingency plan is in place in case of rain. Any questions can be directed to the church office at 262-334-9892 or visit www.shepherdofthehillswi.com for more information.

Andrew Wundrock named new President of Wisconsin Pharmacal

Wisconsin Pharmacal Company, LLC has announced Andrew Wundrock has been appointed to the position of President of the company effective September 2020. Wundrock has been with Wisconsin Pharmacal for over 25+ years in various roles – most recently Senior Vice President Sales & Marketing.

Wundrock’s thorough understanding of the consumer product space, Wisconsin Pharmacal’s core strengths, and his unique relationship with the retail trade position him well to advance the company forward in this competitive landscape.

“Andrew has demonstrated a keen understanding of our business throughout the years. His dedication to the company and attention to detail, along with his long-tenured relationships with our major retail partners, make him an excellent choice to lead our company”, said John Wundrock – CEO.

Wisconsin Pharmacal and its subsidiary, Lake Consumer Products, manufacture and market a wide variety of outdoor health and safety, first aid, and feminine health & wellness products across a widevariety of retail outlets – including Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Target, Amazon, and others.

“It is with a great deal of enthusiasm that I accept the position of President of Wisconsin Pharmacal. I am highly confident we have the best team in place to help us advance the company forward in a very competitive landscape. I am proud of our accomplishments to date and look forward to new challenges and opportunities.” said Wundrock. Wisconsin Pharmacal is a diversified consumer products company that is FDA & EPA approved and manufactures and distributes long-established brands in the OTC Health/First Aid and Outdoor/Safety markets.

Election Day

Election Day is Tuesday, November 3, 2020.  Over the weekend quite a few neighbors across Washington County received their mail-in ballot via U.S. Postal.

Wisconsin will mail all registered voters an application to vote absentee prior to the election. You can also vote in person as Wisconsin offers early voting.

Details and deadlines for Election Day, November 3, 2020

The following details are per the Wisconsin Election Commission.

The deadline to register online to vote is Wednesday, October 14, 2020.

According to the Wisconsin Election Commission: All voters in Wisconsin can request an absentee ballot be mailed to them for any reason.  Voters must be registered before they can request an absentee ballot.   Voters may request their absentee ballot in writing.

The deadline for registering by mail to vote is postmarked by Wednesday, October 14, 2020.

The deadline to request a ballot by mail is (received by) Thursday, October 29, 2020.

The deadline to register in person to vote is Friday, October 30, 2020.

According to the Wisconsin Election Commission –  Voters may register in-person in their municipal clerk’s office during the clerk’s business hours until 5 p.m. on October 30, 2020.  Find your Municipal Clerk’s Contact Information here.

The early voting period runs from Tuesday, October 20, 2020 to Sunday, November 1, 2020, but dates and hours may vary based on where you live.

You can also register and vote on Election Day, Tuesday, November 3. Polls will open at 7 a.m. – 8 p.m. Remember to bring a valid I.D.

According to the Wisconsin Election Commission – Voters can register to vote at their polling place on Election Day, November 3, 2020.  Find your Polling Place here.

Election questions from the community:

A woman at Cedar Ridge received her absentee ballot and the envelope the ballot arrived in was open. Was this tampered with?

West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann – “It is the mail machine. Sometimes the envelope goes through the machine and doesn’t hit the sealer properly and it doesn’t seal the envelope correctly.”

Can people vote three days after November 3, 2020 with no postmark needed on their mail-in ballot?

West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann – “That is not correct. Right now, all election rules are in place. I have to receive this ballot by 8 p.m. on election night, November 3, 2020. If it comes on Nov. 4 it is past the deadline.  If it arrives on Nov. 4 and it is postmarked Nov. 2 it is after the deadline.  I have to receive all ballots by 8 p.m. on November 3.

How many mail-in ballots has the City of West Bend sent.

West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justman – “The City of West Bend sent 5,400 absentee ballots out for the Nov. 3, 2020 election as of September 21, 2020. At the last presidential election in 2016 there were a total of 5200. We’ve now mailed out more in total than the last presidential election.”

If I send in my mail-in ballot now… when will it be counted?

West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann – “The mail-in ballots that are returned now will be counted on Election Day. We start at 7 a.m. and at central count we will have three voting machines that will be counting ballots on Election Day. There will be three different groups of central count poll workers.

If the mail-in being stored until Election Day where is it being stored?

 West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann – “The mail-in ballots are held in the vault at City Hall. Everything is alphabetized by district and held there until election day.”

Even though there is postage included on the mail-in ballots, can those ballots be walked into and dropped off at City Hall?

West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann – “Absolutely. The media has been telling people to drop them off at City Hall. You can mail it in or drop it off at the clerk’s office or you can bring it to the polls on Election Day and turn it in.”

Below is a list of polling places for November 3, 2020 in the City of West Bend.  If you need help determining your polling place click HERE.

District            polling location in City of West Bend

Aldermanic District #1           Washington County Courthouse, 432 E. Washington Street

Aldermanic District #2           Washington Co. PAC,  333 E. Washington Street (Indiana Ave.)

Aldermanic District #3           First Baptist Church 2300 S. Main Street

Aldermanic District #4           City Hall, 1115 S. Main Street (West Entrance)

Aldermanic District #5           Washington Co. PAC,  333 E. Washington Street (Indiana Ave.)

Aldermanic District #6           Washington County Govt Center, 432 E. Washington Street

Aldermanic District #7           Moraine Park Technical College, 2151 N. Main Street AMTC Addition, Entrance T2,

Aldermanic District #8           City Hall, 1115 S. Main Street (West Entrance)

Anyone who is not sure in which Aldermanic District he/she resides, may call the City Clerk’s Office at 262-335-5103.  All polling places are accessible to disabled voters.

Preserve Parkway road closure in Village of Germantown starts September 28

There will be a road closure effective Monday, September 28 at 6 a.m., Preserve Parkway in the Village of Germantown will be closed to facilitate the installation of sanitary sewer for Kinderberg Estates.

The road closure starts at Buckthorn Drive (north end of Kinderberg Park) south to Donges Bay Road. This closure will ensure the safety of the traveling public and utility workers. Preserve Parkway will reopen at 7 a.m. on Wednesday, September 30.

Village of Germantown to hold in-person absentee voting on two Saturdays in October

In Person Absentee Voting begins Tuesday, October 20, 2020 for the November 3, 2020 General / Presidential Election.

Below is a list of in-person voting hours in the Village of Germantown.

October 20 – October 22:  8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

October 23:  8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday, October 24:  8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

October 26 – October 29:  8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

October 30:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, October 31:  8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

October 30 is the last day to register to vote in the Village of Germantown Clerk’s Office prior to the election. There is no absentee voting or voter registration on November 2, the day prior to the election.

You may also make a request in writing to receive an absentee ballot through the mail.

All requests for an Absentee Ballot must be in writing by the elector. Use the Application for Absentee Ballot or write an email or letter requesting an absentee ballot be mailed to you.

The application must be received by the Clerk no later than 5 p.m. on the Thursday, October 29 before the election in order for an absentee ballot to be mailed to you.

Any written requests must include the following information:

Name of the registered voter requesting the absentee ballot.

The address to which you are registered to vote in the Village of Germantown.

The address where the ballot should be sent, if different than your residence.

The signature of the registered voter requesting the absentee ballot. Signature is not required for email requests.

If you have not previously provided a copy of photo ID, photo ID must accompany the request. For the full list of acceptable photo ID visit http://bringit.wi.gov.

Registered Voters may request an absentee ballot via MyVote.WI.gov and follow the instructions. Questions may be directed to the Village of Germantown Clerk’s Office at 262-250-4740 or via email at elections@village.germantown.wi.us

RIP Gale Sayers

RIP

Former Bears running back Gale Sayers, an all-purpose tailback who took the league by storm as a rookie in 1965, has died. He was 77.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame announced Sayers’ passing.

On December 12, 1965, Sayers scored a single-game record six touchdowns in a game against the 49ers, with an 80-yard catch-and-run, four rushing touchdowns (including a 50-yarder), and an 85-yard punt return. He finished his rookie year with 22 touchdowns.

Sayers made it to the Hall of Fame despite playing only 68 regular-season games, due to knee injuries that shortened his career. As explained earlier this year, Sayers forever will be linked to Brian Piccolo, a teammate who died of cancer at 26. Their close friendship became the subject of Brian’s Song.

Lack of Diversity in Car Colors

Huh.

The vast majority of cars on the road around the world are painted in just a few colors. All of them are what people in the coatings industry call “achromatic.” That means they are colors that are not that colorful: white, black, gray and silver.

Thirty-nine percent of the cars in the world are white, according to data compiled in 2019 by coatings company BASF. Black, gray and silver together make up another 39% of cars on the road. That means nearly 80% of all vehicles are painted with achromatic lacquer.

The most popular chromatic color is blue — about 9% of cars come in that color, and just 7% of vehicles are painted red.

The reasons for this are varied, say some in the coatings industry. Risk averse dealers might choose to stock the most popular colors, thus limiting the overall supply of unusual hues. Risk averse consumers might worry about an odd color driving down resale value.

Round the Bend by Judy Steffes

Election information

Election Day is Tuesday, November 3, 2020.  Over the weekend quite a few neighbors across Washington County received their mail-in ballot via U.S. Postal. Wisconsin will mail all registered voters an application to vote absentee prior to the election. You can also vote in person as Wisconsin offers early voting.

The deadline to register online to vote is Wednesday, October 14, 2020.

The deadline for registering by mail to vote is postmarked by Wednesday, October 14, 2020.

The deadline to register in person to vote is Friday, October 30, 2020.

The deadline to request a ballot by mail is (received by) Thursday, October 29, 2020.

The early voting period runs from Tuesday, October 20, 2020 to Sunday, November 1, 2020, but dates and hours may vary based on where you live.

You can also register and vote on Election Day, Tuesday, November 3. Polls will open at 7 a.m. – 8 p.m. Remember to bring a valid I.D.

Building formerly home to JP Foz’s sold by Adam Williquette

The building that housed JP Foz’s has sold. Fasciano Properties, LLC sold to 301 Properties, LLC for $325,000. The property was sold as an investment for 301 Properties, LLC.

Adam Williquette, president of American Commercial Real Estate handled the transaction. This is the fifth building American Commercial Real Estate has sold downtown West Bend in the last 12 months.

The 2020 assessed value was $277,500.  Foz Enterprises LLC purchased the property April 1, 2001 for $210,000.

On October 17, 1996 Barbercheck and Gundrum purchased the property for $186,000.

That corner building has been home to many locally owned tavernkeepers. Among them “Three Old Guys” and “The Pub.”

The Pub was Bob Weston. Three Old Guys was Don Zimmel, Russ and Randy Miller and Al May was the Kings Guard Pub with “the best hot buttered rum” drinks.

Over the years other tenants in the tavern included Herbie Lundquist who named it The Blue Room. Bob Corbett dubbed it Corby’s. Bob Weston changed it to The Pub. The tavern was The Mixing Place and then Al May moved in with Kings Guard Pub and Don Zimmel later ran it as Three Old Guys with Russ Vermillion and Randy Miller.

 

Final totals for United Way of Washington County Food Drive

 The United Way of Washington County is toasting the community with three cheers of “Thanks” for participating in the kickoff campaign food drive.

The final total amount of food collected was announced by United Way executive director Kristin Brandner.

“Al Pauli from Full Shelf Food Pantry followed up today that over 5,000 pounds of food was donated.  Al said we exceeded his expectations! Thank you for being our committed partner and being awesome!!! We do have a good time doing good work!”

United Against Hunger was a drive-thru event held at the Washington County Fair Park. Eighty-nine vehicles drove in and hundreds of bags and boxes of nonperishable food items were donated.

Leading this year’s annual campaign are Women in Business: Prudence Pick Hway, Debra Cahoon, Amy Salberg, Rose Petitte and Jacci Gambucci.

Highway 60 open from Jackson to 5 Corners in Cedarburg

Motorists traveling Highway 60 rejoice as the road reopened between Jackson and 5 Corners Dodge in Cedarburg. It was April 20, 2020 when Highway 60 was closed from Eagle Drive (Piggly Wiggly) in Jackson to Highway 181 by 5 Corners in Cedarburg.

Road crews could be seen just west of Cedarburg collecting orange-and-white striped barricades as vehicles zipped up and down the fresh blacktop.

Work included updated signage, pavement marking, restoration, and lighting at the roundabout at County Y.  The extensive summer project included milling off the top two inches of roadway and laying four new inches of pavement. The paved shoulder width was increased to six feet, and bypass lanes and right turn lanes at intersections added or extended as needed.

In addition to the resurfacing, the State reconstructed the intersection of STH 60 and CTH Y with a roundabout to address traffic safety concerns.

American Construction Services recognized by MMAC                By Marie Kohler

American Construction Services is being recognized by the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce (MMAC) as an honoree in their Focus on the Future Awards.

American Construction Services was entered in the Pivot Not Panic category with its 40th anniversary story.

This past spring, the American team was looking for a way to celebrate 40 years in business. This was also the time the COVID-19 virus hit.

Even through all the unknowns and the fear of the pandemic, the leadership team knew it wanted to find a way to celebrate by helping the community during the uncertain times.

Dubbed the “40 for 4 and 40 for 40 celebration,” American Construction Services sponsored 40 meals each for four Washington County non-profits from four Washington County restaurants. To go along with that, the service staff at each of the restaurants was tipped 40 percent.

The non-profits that were supported for the celebration were Friends Inc, Karl’s Place, Medical Center Foundation of Hartford, and Interfaith Caregivers.

The meals received were prepared by The Norbert and Poplar Inn, Culaccino’s Bar and Italian Kitchen, Perc Place, and Precinct Tap & Table.

“It was an honor to be able to give back to the community after receiving so much of their support throughout the years,” said American Companies president Kraig Sadownikow. “Thank you to the MMAC for the honor and congratulations to American Companies.”

Trick-or-treat hours across Washington County

Halloween is Saturday, October 31, 2020 and trick-or-treat hours have been posted across Washington County.

Town of Addison 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 25.

Village of Jackson 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Newburg 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31

Village of Slinger 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Germantown 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31. (Ben from the clerk’s office said, “Trick or treat will go on even if it snows…. like it did in 2019.” He said Germantown received 6 inches of snow. Remember that??)

City of Hartford 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Halloween Saturday, Oct. 31

Village of Kewaskum 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Richfield 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.

West Bend 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31

Crack and joint sealing schedule in West Bend

Crack and joint sealing work in West Bend will be performed through the following street segments beginning Monday, September 21, 2020 until approximately October 9, 2020. Please note the project dates may be adjusted due to weather conditions or other circumstances.

5th Ave: Maple St to Oak St   6th Ave: Decorah Rd to Oak St

7th Ave: Vine St to Decorah Rd    8th Ave: Pine Dr to Chestnut St

12th Ave: Walnut St to Chestnut St   18th Ave: Chestnut St to W Washington St

Decorah Rd: University Dr to 18th Ave   Indiana Ave: E Washington St to Oak St

Indiana Ave: Hargrove St to Paradise Dr    Silverbrook Dr: Hawthorn Dr to Paradise Dr

University Dr: Decorah Rd to Campus Dr    N River Rd: E Washington St to Creek Rd

Creek Rd: Schmidt Rd to Trenton Rd    12th Ave: Wayne Rd to Park Ave

13th Ave: Alder St to Wayne Rd      18th Ave: Park Ave to Jefferson St

Motorists are reminded to abide by all traffic control signs and devices as well as be aware of ongoing construction activities. Please plan on using alternate routes to avoid construction whenever possible. Please communicate this information with any delivery vehicles or other interested parties. Construction activities will include cleaning and routing existing cracks, placement of crack sealing material and restoration of disturbed areas.

Planning underway for new displays at Enchantment in the Park 2020

The Christmas season may be months away but this week planning began for 2020 Enchantment in the Park at Regner Park in West Bend.

Founded in 2009, the mission of the event was “to create a holiday adventure where wonder and excitement are experienced through enchanting holiday light displays, music and other performing arts.” According to organizer Lori Yahr there will be some changes this year.

“This year will be a bit different,” said Yahr. “We will still have the holiday light drive thru, fire pit with marshmallows, horse-and-carriage rides, and music in the stage area.”

Also new will be a 50-foot high Grinch and Snoopy characters courtesy Pet Supplies Plus in West Bend. There will also be some new vintage artwork, improved lighting, and decorative pergola by the walkway entrance to the park.

In an effort to be considerate of the current CDC guidelines there will be some noticeable changes. “We reached out to area school groups and they told us they are not having music classes this year so they won’t be able to perform,” said Yahr.

The Enchantment Board also decided not to put up the enclosed pavilion, Santa’s workshop, indoor stage and for now Santa is on hold.

‘We will look at our food collection procedures and see if we have to tweak anything for added safety,” Yahr said. The Senior Center will still be selling snacks in a paired down concession stand. Hot cocoa and packaged snacks will be available. They will work out of the Kiwanis Building and the volunteer groups will move to the Rotary Building.

Enchantment in the Park will be open Friday, Nov. 27 and run through Christmas Eve, Dec. 24.

Setup for Enchantment in the Park begins October 9, 2020.

West Bend Common Council approves new ordinance allowing dogs in City parks

The West Bend Common Council is set to approve an ordinance regarding dogs in City parks. It was July 2020 when the Parks Commission went round and round on the issue.

The final vote was 5-2 with aldermen John Butschlick and Brett Berquist dissenting.  District 4 alderman Randy Koehler was not in attendance.

Currently dogs can be on a 6-foot leash on the Riverwalk, in Old Settlers Park and Vest Pocket Park.

The new ordinance would allow dogs in other City parks except Regner Park, Lac Lawrann Conservancy and park buildings. Special events at City parks would also not be open to dogs.

The new ordinance would be evaluated in one year.

Ordinance to be updated:

20.07 (6) Animals (c) (Rep. & Recr. Ord# 2832 – 5/14/2019) Designated On-Leash Dog Areas. Dogs shall be allowed in the following parks, or the designated area within a park, but shall be restrained by a leash with a length of six feet or less.

  1. Ridge Run Park – entire park. 2. Glacier Blue Hills Recreation Area – Ice Age Trial only.
  2. West Bend Riverwalk – sidewalk/trail portion only. 4. Old Settlers Park – entire park.
  3. Vest Pocket Park – Sidewalk portion only.

Update:

Dogs shall be allowed in all city parks, except for prohibited park areas. All dogs must be on a leash no longer than 6 feet at all times, and under owners control -unless in Rolfs dog park leash-free area. Any pet owner who fails to control their pet, create public nuisance, or disturb others may be asked to leave. All pet waste must be picked up and disposed of in garbage receptacles. Bags, scoops, or other implements for the removal of pet waste must be carried by any person bringing a pet onto park property.

Prohibited Areas: Dogs are not allowed at special events, park buildings or picnic shelters, within children’s playground areas, beaches, or athletic fields.

Why: The updates to this ordinance will allow the City of West Bend parks to come in line with both Washington County Parks (which allow dogs in parks on 6-foot leash) as well as Wisconsin State Parks (that allow dogs on 6-foot leash in parks except for prohibited areas).

Hand-me-down dishes hold memories and family history lessons | By Ann Marie Craig

The tines are bent and uneven and the wood handles show more than a century of wear. They live in the far recesses of the silverware drawer and hardly see the light of day anymore, but I cannot bear to part with them because they belong here in the house where they came as new forks to be used by the farming family who became my great-grandparents and grandparents and mother.

Its top edges are pocked a bit and if there ever was a lid it is now missing, but you can still see the swirls on the inside bottom from having been thrown on a pottery wheel many, many years ago. Its outside is roughly salt glazed in an uneven earthy brown and the inside is colored with dark, smooth, brown slip. Great-Grandma Anna’s salt crock is still intact and I guard it carefully even as I use it to hold springtime pussy willows and late fall dogwood and spruce branches. It belongs here too, having been used day after day as she cooked and baked on the wood stove in the tiny kitchen of this tiny log cabin.

_________________

It is not unusual for me to reach into a cupboard and grab a pot or a spoon or a bowl or a cake plate that once belonged to someone on my family tree, and every piece has a story or it would not have ended up in my kitchen.

I crawl deeply into the back corner of a lower cupboard with a flashlight twice a year to find the salt crock, each time holding it in my hands, carefully filling it will pretty branches and setting it on a table or deep windowsill, touching and imagining. I never knew my great-grandmother, but I can almost see her, and later my grandmother, reaching into the cellar almost without thinking as they seasoned the meat or vegetables cooking on the wood stove. That wood stove sat just about where my kitchen table now stands and the crock was nearby and used every day.

When I was growing up I would see those old forks in my grandmother’s kitchen utensil drawer. They made fine holders of meats that needed to be held still for cutting, but they probably had outworn their use as everyday tableware. I chose to bring them home with me years later, and they now are seen really only when I get around to cleaning the kitchen cabinets.

They are over 100 years old and saw a lot of use at the farm table in this cabin. What I learned when I brought them back after my mother had a good clear out of her drawers, was that they were used by my great-grandparents and their six children and were left behind when they retired and my grandfather took over the farm.

I look at them and think of stories told about the house and farm and about my grandfather before he married.

My grandparents married in 1920, but just a year or so earlier my grandfather became ill with the Spanish Influenza. No one was certain how he caught it because as a farmer, he almost never went anywhere. It was said that WWI soldiers brought the virus back with them from the front. Was he sneezed upon by someone at the feed mill or the hardware store? Could he have caught it at a dance, perhaps?

Family lore still speculates, but he was very ill for three months. His unmarried sister Mary came to keep house and nurse him, and his brothers helped with the farm work. I am pretty sure he ate with those wood-handled forks left behind by his parents because he didn’t yet have a wife to change the silverware style.

Somehow September and the start of autumn makes me want to nestle into home. I cook and bake and reminisce about the times shared in the kitchen around tables seasoned with family recipes and stories that keep us connected and cozy. It somehow is important to me to touch the things that family before me touched and those links to the past make the present warm and the future inviting.     Find more stories by Ann Marie Craig at CenturyFarmhouse.com

Lust for Green Energy Risks Destruction of Entire Species

Heh.

Nestled among the slopes of Nevada’s Silver Peak Range are six patches of Tiehm’s buckwheat, a rare flowering plant found nowhere else in the world. Only an estimated 42,000 plants remain on 10 acres. But over the weekend, conservationists discovered that 40% of the total population had been destroyed.

The destruction occurs amid a conflict over the flower’s habitat. For the past year and a half, Donnelly and Naomi Fraga, director of conservation at the California Botanic Garden, have been working to protect Tiehm’s buckwheat from a proposed mine for lithium and boron, elements involved in producing clean energy technology. The operation would encompass the entire range of the plant’s population, risking its extinction in the wild.

“I would not oppose the mine if it was done in a way that didn’t put the whole species at risk, and was environmentally sound,” said Fraga. “What is the cost of green energy if it causes the extinction of whole species?”

Soccer Team Loses 37-0 Due to Social Distancing

Hilarious. Good for Holdenstedt. Take the win.

He added of his players: “They did not go into direct duels and observed the social distancing rules, keeping two metres between them and Holdenstedt players.”
Holdenstedt did not hold back, scoring a goal every two or three minutes.
“There was no reason not to play this game,” Holdenstedt coach Florian Schierwater said.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Village of Slinger surprised by plans for Casey’s General Store

“It was the biggest shock last week,” said Village of Slinger Administrator Margaret Wilber. “Casey’s called and is stopping the project.”

The project in question is the razing of the Casey’s General Store and car wash, 651 E. Washington Street, in Slinger.

A spokesperson for Casey’s called WashingtonCountyInsider.com and issued the following statement. “We are not planning to proceed with construction as we are focusing store development efforts in other areas. We appreciate the support the Slinger community had for this store.  We will continue to work with the local Village and ensure the site is in good condition.”

The demolition of the corner gas station began Wednesday, September 2, 2020.

Plans had already been approved for development of a new store until a voicemail was left Thursday, Sept. 4 with Gregory Darga the Village Building Inspector/Zoning Administrator. That’s when the project went sideways.

“Mid-day we were informed that Casey’s cancelled the project,” said Darga.  “So, at this point they will complete the demolition, restore the site to grass and then there won’t be anything there for the foreseeable future.”

Wilber pointed out that Darga’s voicemail was from the project manager, so someone not related to Casey’s.

“They were called and ordered to stop the project,” said Wilber.

Village officials spent all day Friday, before the long Labor Day holiday weekend, trying to contact someone at Casey’s.

“I finally spoke with a couple of people who confirmed an executive decision had been made and they weren’t going to continue at this time,” Wilber said. “They were going to restore the lot and the decision hadn’t been made yet whether they would put a new building up or put it on the market.”

“It was quite a surprise because they went through all the trouble of starting the teardown,” Wilber said.

The Village of Slinger Plan Commission approved plans for a new Casey’s convenience store and car wash in July 2019. “It was approved almost a year ago,” said Wilber. “At that time, the Plan Commission approved the site, architectural, lighting, landscaping, and stormwater.”

The property was purchased by Casey’s General Store in December 2018. Tri-Par previously owned the 1.92-acre site. The sale price was $850,000. The latest assessed value is $1.292 million.

Wilber has been the Village Administrator for a year but has been with the Village for 20 years. “This has completely taken us by surprise,” she said. “It did cross our mind that the project may have been paused because of Covid… but…”

Darga has been with the Village for eight years. “I’ve never seen anything like this,” he said. “The permits for the building had been issued and the demolition permit had been issued and after months and months of trying to get this thing going, finally they were starting and as soon as we started they pulled the project.”

“We’re very disappointed,” said Wilber. “We’re going to try to keep in touch with Casey’s and monitor their progress and continue to get updates on the plans.”

A representative for Casey’s, Jim Sklada, told Wilber there had been no decision whether the property would be put up for sale.

Slinger lemonade stand and food pantry                        By Corbin Stover (5th grade)

At Slinger Schlesinger Village kids in the neighborhood did a lemonade stand during our last week of summer in August. Jovy, Corbin, Alex, Soffy, Elliot, Elvlyn, and Noah wanted to do this for people that are homeless and it was the right thing to do.

Me and my friends did this for fun too. We made $275.85 in donations and a big bucket of food. Corbin and Jovy collected food from 20 to 30 homes. We started at 2:30pm and ended at 5:30pm. We got 75 to 80 customers it was crazy big. We got so excited when we got customers. We loved it so much, it was awesome. I was mesmerized by the money we got and the food. The food pantry people were mind blown.

93-year-old female mechanic goes for spin in ’57 Chevy Bel Air 283

It was a memorable day for Ellen Hembel as a friend from Just Like Home in Jackson brought his 1957 Chevy Bel Air to take her for a spin.

Ellen is 93-and-a-half years old. She is more than familiar with the Chevy Bel Air having been an auto mechanic most of her life.

“My dad worked on cars,” said Ellen.

She said she got her start when “his hands didn’t work so well.”

Ellen was part of the family business, when Hembel’s had an auto shop off Highway 41.

“The first car I worked on was an Essex,” she said. “I got all the cars running.”

With family gathered on a rainy Thursday morning, Ellen took a look under the hood before she climbed in the passenger seat.

“This is the battery and the engine and the radiator and the horn,” she said.

Jim Bird has owned car for 44 years. “It has been a pleasure to meet a lot of people,” he said.

Bird bought the car in Iowa; paid $1,200. “I drove it back to Fond du Lac. We had no muffler or lights.”

As the engine roared to life, Ellen smiled. “Nice and tuned up,” she said.

Ellen’s chauffeur slowly put the pedal to the metal and at 5 miles per hour they left the carport and made one slow lap around the driveway and back home.

“Wonderful,” said Ellen hugging her great grandchildren. “Simply wonderful.”

WIS 33 over the Milwaukee River in the Town of Trenton closed Monday, Sept. 14

Construction crews will be out Monday, September 14 at the WIS 33 bridge over the Milwaukee River doing bridge deck repairs and an overlay. Work includes bridge deck repair and over

Full closure of WIS 33 over the Milwaukee River for approximately 3 weeks starting September 14. Through traffic will be detoured along County M and Main Street in Newburg.

Local access will be available up to the road closure located at the bridge. The signed detour takes motorists along County Road M, but locals more familiar with the area may look to alternate routes. WIS 33 is scheduled to open in early October.

Fond memories found in the kitchen cupboard

A bit of a Hallmark moment this week for Jodi Janisse-Kanzenbach of West Bend as she worked in her favorite room in the house. The head chef and owner of Precinct Tap & Table in Germantown was doing what she does best when she found the items, she was working with hit her right in the feelings.

“Brought peace to me tonight baking in hand-me-down loaf pans I’ve had for 20 years. Using my Dutch oven from my husband, Pyrex bowls from a friend, and eating our dinner in vintage soup bowls kindly gifted to me after being found in a shed up north on my father-in-law’s property. This is part of the problem I have with owning entirely too much kitchenware.”

On that note, other Good Housekeeping type stories started to emerge as it appears many women have strong ties to their kitchens and tools of the trade.

Carol H. writes – “I inherited six of these Fire King ovenproof dishes from my mom who passed away in 2018. I think these were supermarket premiums. My mom used them mainly on special occasions or for special recipes like French onion soup. They were ideal for placing in the oven for melting the cheese on top of the soup.”

Here’s a baking pan (8 x 10” in size) with a sliding cover. I remember my mom using this pan for baking goodies like Blonde Brownies or Lazy Daisy Cake.

Stefanie Ulma of West Bend owned The Grasshopper Restaurant on N. Main Street. She was the head chef and made the beautiful bakery displayed in the glass case.

A photo is held tight to her home refrigerator with a magnet of the Pillsbury Doughboy. It shows a kitchen with relatable wooden cabinets, large-print wallpaper and three ladies working at the counter. Ulma said she started young, learning from her mother and grandmother.

“Since I learned my passion from my Mom …of course I have all her recipe books along with notes on the sides of what to add and how good it was. I still use her big countertop mixer… the dough hook is a constant reminder that my Mom was an excellent bread maker (I only have a few recipes under my belt).

“This time of year, especially. there was always a covered bowl in a warm spot in the house rising with some type of bread or pastry. At Christmas time I bring out her spritz cookie maker and her cookie cutters.

“Baking always reminds me of entering in the State Fair with my Mom. We would bake all day and night before and then sit all day with all these other women we made friends with from years before. We would cheer them on too and spend the day exchanging recipes and ideas and watch the judges take tiny bites of our items. My Mom won the Archway competition one year. Such an awesome memory.  I also have her aprons which I really wish SHE was still wearing ..showing me the ropes… I have so much more I wanted to learn from her.”

Lori writes – Nothing in the kitchen from my mom. I do have a cast iron fry pan from my girlfriend’s mom; she was a true hoarder.

I have a handwritten cookbook from my Mom…but not much else. Oh, the two Miracle Maid West Bend Company cake pans…. that is what husband brought into the marriage 41 years ago.

RoxAnn Witkowski – What a great article. It made me go to my kitchen cupboards and see what I could find (besides, it was time to straighten).

There were the cast iron pans that were my grandmother’s. Still great for browning meat and making Dutch baby pancakes. The Duncan Hines cookware made by Regal Ware in Kewaskum. It was waterless! I remember the time and planning my mother put into a dinner party. By hosting she got a discount on the purchase of the cookware. Fifty plus years later it is still being used daily.

She was very active in a homemaker’s group. They would take trips around the state of Wisconsin. From Mirror aluminum in Manitowoc, I have an angel food cake pan and star Jell-O mold. Oh, the time it took to layer all that Jell-O. From West Bend the cake pans in all sizes. Those cake pans have been to hundreds of functions. Then there is the Pyrex ware. The design may be old but the durability speaks for itself. Taste of Home in Greendale I think was her favorite. She saved every cooking magazine from them. My sister and I still make many of the recipes and have passed them on to our children. Thank you for sharing. I may no longer live in Wisconsin, but the memories are priceless. Take care y’all.

Darlene Hefter from Allenton – I use my mom’s good china every time I have a sit-down formal dinner since I never had china and mom always said you see and get that someday. Love her loaf pans for baking bread; always gets so nice and brown in her pans. Always use her hand mixer for beating up eggs.  I do treasure wine glasses and other design glasses from my Grandma’s and cut-glass relish trays I always use from my mom.

Kitten rescued from engine compartment by Bob’s Main Street Auto

As cooler weather is slowly approaching, Bob’s Main Street Auto & Towing would like to remind everyone to check their vehicles for furry little friends. This week Bob’s Main Street Auto & Towing in West Bend received a call from police that someone saw a kitten climb up underneath their car. After towing the vehicle to the shop, technicians Brett and Zach and tow truck driver Chris never heard a single noise which made the search even more challenging.

Piece by piece was removed from the car until the entire front end was disassembled. After what felt like forever, the black kitten, which was smaller than the technician’s hand was rescued from a small compartment near the engine.  During the changing seasons animals will look for warm places to stay; it is not uncommon to find a cat perched inside a wheel well. Bob’s Main Street Auto would like to remind everyone to keep their vehicles and furry friends safe and look over your car before driving. If you find yourself thinking, or knowing, you have an animal hiding in your vehicle, please give us call and we will be happy to assist you and the stowaway.

Graffiti in West Bend and Kewaskum

Police in West Bend said they were aware of multiple instances of graffiti on S. Main Street. Someone with red and blue spray paint tagged a number of businesses including the Decorah Shopping Center, the old Shopko and Kohl’s Department Store.  Police said the business owners will be contacted. They would then have 24 hours to clean up the graffiti. Police are expected to visit businesses along S. Main Street to see if there is any surveillance video. More details are expected to be released when information becomes available.

Aside from West Bend, the bridge on Fond du Lac Avenue just south of Highway 28 west was also tagged. There’s no confirmation on whether the tagging incidents are related.

West Bend man’s marathon on Eisenbahn Trail to raise awareness

Thaddeus Bath, 34, will be running the Boston Marathon virtually in West Bend on the Eisenbahn State Trail this Saturday, September 12. Bath is running for himself and to bring attention to narcolepsy, a diagnosis he received about five years ago. By using Taekwondo and running, Bath has found a way to fight daily battles of addiction and the sleep disorder.

“Running, especially trail running, is a therapy for me,” said Bath. “Taekwondo has been great for me with the discipline and structure. It helped me become an all-around better person.

“Being active does help me with some of the narcolepsy symptoms. I have a little more energy during the day if I stick to my schedule of running/working out.” Tabetha Wolfe said her brother has worked hard to get where he is today.

“Not only training but bringing awareness and fundraising for the nonprofit Wake Up Narcolepsy,” said Wolfe. “Running the marathon virtually is not the same as being in Boston but if I can get enough community support it will make it that much more memorable for Thaddeus.”

Bath will be running September 12 starting at noon. He will start on the Eisenbahn Trail near Legacy Martial Arts, 111 E. Decorah, Road, West Bend. He will run south to Paradise Drive then north to Highway 33 and back. He will run out and backs until he reaches 26.2 miles.

Letter to the Editor |   Looking ahead to November election             By Ken Miller

Recently I have heard from a number of Conservatives/Republicans, having doubts about Pres. Trump. Very disturbing. I do not like some of his tactics, verbiage, and temperament. He is a “shoot from the hip” type and can be blunt not mincing words.

He demeaner is bordering on I’itis These traits can be annoying and rather unproductive. But he’s not a diplomate or politician, he’s all business accustomed to getting things done his way and that, my friends is working.

His successes are many such as the border wall, NAFTA rescinding and a new fair-trade agreement. NATO allies paying their fair share. Holding Russia at bay. Cutting off China and brokering agreements such as Israel and UAE, all but destroying ISIS and bringing troops home.

During his term, the economy rose to record heights and stock market it all time high. The list of course is incomplete and does leave out some unsuccessful attempts. But the point is he has done more in 4 years discounting the pandemic which Dem’s claim he did not solve fast enough.

Let’s look at the Liberal side. Joe Biden is the savior of the party along with Kamala. They tout the accomplishment of Joe.  His reviving of the economy in 2008, was that his, Really? I am convinced it was Obama’s which he went along with, during his Vice Presidency we heard little of his betterment of the country. He was afraid, (up to now) [’ to debate Trump.

Biden has barely condemned the riots, looting, destruction of businesses which are another plus for the Dem’s claiming Trump has not done enough. They are not saying that the Democratic Governor’s refused the help.

His health plan is a plan to bankrupt America. To further the spending of non-existent money he wants open borders and health care and funding benefits for all. His leadership skills wane against Trump and his program will take us back to the oppressive Obama years. It is incumbent to vote for a proven leader that has brought this country to becoming a world leader again.

Kenneth F. Miller   Germantown

Former President, Washington County Republican Party  Former County Board Chairman

Disclaimer: Opinions and letters published are not necessarily the views of the Editor, or Publisher. The http://www.washingtoncountyinsider.com reserves the right to edit or omit copy, in accordance with newspaper policies. Letters to the Editor must be attributed with a name, address and contact phone number – names and town of origin will be printed, or may be withheld at the Editor’s discretion. During the course of any election campaign, letters to the editor dealing with election issues or similar material must contain the author’s name and street address (not PO Box) for publication.

The Benefits of Taking Notes By Hand

I totally agree with this.

Whether or not you’re picky, know that tools for the hands are tools for the brain. Handwritten notes are a powerful tool for encrypting embodied cognition and in turn supporting the brain’s capacity for retrieval of information. And secondly, when you take notes by hand, your hands create a robust external memory storage: your notebook.

Taking notes by hand is a win-win, and belongs in every student’s cognitive tool kit. Learning how to take notes by hand effectively, and how to ingrain note-taking as a key learning and study tool, can begin as early as grades 3 or 4, but it’s never too late to begin.

We live in a digital age where daily functioning involves digital communication. Automaticity in keyboarding is an important skill too, and the tools and applications for digital communication will continue to evolve and have their place. But keyboarding does not provide the tactile feedback to the brain that contact between pencil or pen and paper does — the key to creating the neurocircuitry in the hand-brain complex.

I’ve tried a couple of times to pivot to digital notes. They have the benefit of speed (I can type faster than I can write), being searchable, sortable, and easily retrievable. But almost as soon as I finish writing the note, I forget it.

When I write out notes by hand, I will often be able to recall the information far into the future without even actually needing the note. There is something about the act of writing, the spacial use of the paper, the formation of letters, etc. that just set the information into my brain. It’s not efficient, but it works better for me.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Tribute to Mark Jug

It is with a heavy heart to relay the news that Mark Jug, 67, founder of MJ Stevens Pub & Restaurant and founder of McJugger’s Saloon & Grill, has died.

Jug passed Friday night at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. Tributes are below with many comments received referring to Mark Jug as “legend.”

Doreen Laatsch works at Jug’s and got her first job at MJ Stevens. She said the news spread quickly Friday night as staff at Jug’s Hitching Post in Kohlsville was told of his passing.

“He was amazing, wonderful, and he loved everybody he employed,” said Laatsch. “He wanted everybody to enjoy a good meal and enjoy life. In his new bar in Dundee, McJuggers, he had a stained glass made and it was written in Italian ‘In beer there is truth’ and he was so proud of that and he said that a lot.”

Laatsch met Mark Jug in 1989 when she first went to MJ Stevens for a fish fry.

“Isn’t it ironic that he passed away on a fish fry Friday,” she said. “It’s also Labor Day weekend; he employed so many and he passed away on Labor Day weekend.”

Laatsch said Mark Jug always offered a place where people could come and rest their burdens.

“He was proud of his food and if you didn’t like something he made sure you liked it,” she said. “He touched so many lives and so many people were crying last night when Jason called and told us.

“The college kids grew up in this restaurant. They’d go away to school and then when they came home they would have their job back,” said Laatsch. “It’s like we were all his children.”

Jug had been hospitalized since mid-August. He had been planning to open McJugger’s Saloon in Dundee.

In February 2018 Mark Jug sold MJ Stevens. He said at the time…

“You know I feel it was time to go a little smaller,” he said. “I’ve worked 32 years here.”

It was 1979 when Jug took over the Long Branch in Barton. In 1985 he took over the bar that ran alongside then Highway 41. “It was called the Timber Inn,” he said. Owners were John Kreilkamp and Harold Hefter.

“I leased it from them for three years and then I bought it,” said Jug.

Over three decades there were plenty of memorable moments at MJ Stevens. “We had two New Year’s Eves in a row that we got hit with snowstorms and we lost both those nights,” said Jug.

If that wasn’t bad enough… “We also had two Father’s Days in a row and some guy hit a pole and knocked all of our electricity out and then the next year Mother Nature hit something electrical again and down we went that year too,” he said. “How the hell does that happen?”

Over the years the “traditional pub-style restaurant with an old-world traditional flavor” grew in popularity. Neighbors would wait an hour for a Friday fish fry, prime rib or Sunday brunch. The time would pass swiftly with a Bloody Mary at the bar or a traditional Old Fashioned.

Jug credits his 80 employees for making the business a success. During a recent Christmas party he made a list of all his long-time employees and read it aloud.

“When we started here it was just Brian the bartender, Manny, who is still with me, he was the server and I did the cooking and dishes,” said Jug. “The first Friday we sold 25 pounds of fish and I was so happy. Now we do 600 – 700 pounds.”

After a heavy pause Jug admitted he had been thinking about selling the business for a while. “It’s a big place; big operation,” he said. “I’m going to do something… it’s going to be hard to let go here.”

Scott Ritger is with the Slinger-Allenton Rotary.

“Mark was a one of a kind, a very thoughtful man who never forgot someone once he meet them. Our Slinger-Allenton Rotary club meetings were graciously hosted by Mark and his staff at MJ’s for more than 10 years already when I joined the group back in 2014.

The day of my induction ceremony Mark took time out of his busy day to attend and was standing in the back of the room the entire time. As the ceremony wrapped up he came up to me and said whenever you stop in here next, you come find me and the first drink is on me while you tell me about your goals for this incredible club.

Every time since then when we stopped in for lunch or dinner at MJ’s, if Mark was there and spotted me, the first drink was already waiting. Mark leaves behind an incredible legacy that will far outlive him. He was a dedicated man of his word and always made sure everyone was taken care of and happy. You would be hard pressed to find anyone who can fill Mark Jug’s shoes.”

John Fritsch: “Hearing of the passing of Mark Jug is a sad time. He was a great person who cared and always said hi to you. Whether he knew you or not. He welcomed you to his restaurant like you were part of his family. I had a couple of his children in my classes when I was teaching. His kids were just like him, always polite and had a smile on their faces. He will be missed by all. He would put out his hand to shake when he came by your table or walking in his place. His food and service were 5 star service every time you went to eat at M.J. Stevens. Prayers and thoughts go out the family of Mark as well to all his former and current employees were also part of his family. Thank you Mark for years of service and knowing you. You will be missed ALL.”

Bob Bonenfant was a frequent visitor to MJ Stevens. “He was successful at whatever endeavor he attempted. If you were around here anytime over the past 40 years you either had a drink or something to eat at one of his places. He was a very nice guy.”

Rick Taetsch: “Mark, rest in peace, fantastic human being, the world will miss you, your kindness, caring, thoughtfulness, and deep laugh will live forever in our memories.. He provided so much joy in his personality, he enjoyed an adult beverage with his friends,

Loved his families, great businessman, heck of a restaurant owner, gave back to the community, Made strong lasting relationships.. Mark enjoy story time with Brain. “Absolutely superb “

Randy Geier has been a friend of Mark Jugs for the last 30+ years.

“My wife, Dawn , worked for him for 30 years at MJs and I for the last 22 years. He was just the nicest, decent, most caring person I’ve ever met. It was a pleasure to work for him, because with Mark you weren’t just an employee, you were family.

He truly cared deeply about his customers and that they have a great dining experience at MJs because with Mark the customer always came first. The things Mark did out of the public eye, the people and families he’s helped are a testament to the big giving heart he had. He will be missed by so many people.”

Funeral details will be posted when information becomes available.

Swarm of bees descend on home in West Bend

It was a quiet Saturday afternoon as a West Bend couple awaited the start of the Kentucky Derby…. and then the swarm of bees arrived.

“From the round plant by the berm there was a swarm of bees that landed in the yard,” said Lori. “It was like locusts. It is insane, they were everywhere.”

Lori sent this message: Ok… so this happened today….. about noon a locust-like swarm invaded the southeast side of our yard. It was insane, not knowing what it was! Well it turned out to be a bee swarm…they decided to make a temporary home in our tree by the pool.

A video provided by the homeowner shows a sunny afternoon at a home off 18th Avenue and while it is difficult to see … trust her, it is bees. A lot of bees. “They started going away but 10 minutes later I see them in the tree,” she said.

The bees have enveloped a tree branch. “They are hanging on each other.” Early word is the queen bee is in the middle of the cake of bees.

Neighbors flocked to see the swarm of bees. “I told them $2 a picture,” said Lori. “What else can happen in 2020? These are the Rona bees.” If anyone wants to professionally remove the bees, please message me and I will put you in touch with the homeowner.

Addison and Nathan’s summer butterfly project

Their classmates may not know it but Addison, 6, and Nathan, 7, of West Bend are entomologists and they spent the summer improving their education as lepidopterists.

Together the brother and sister raised over 100 monarch butterflies and they know so much …. they could teach a class. “The boy butterflies have a spot on the inside of their wings and the girls don’t,” said Addison. “That’s how you tell the difference between a boy butterfly and a girl butterfly.”

The kids and their mom, Katy Moon, have been raising butterflies for several years. They have a garden full of milkweed and colorful flowers and they’ve built a large enclosure with netting and sticks to watch as their science project moves through the stages from egg to caterpillar and then chrysalis to butterfly.

“We find them (the eggs) under the bottom of the leaves of milkweed,” said Nathan. “My mom had the idea of raising them because they’re getting extinct.”

The family glued sticks inside the frame of the butterfly house. After the caterpillars would spin into a chrysalis the kids would attach those to the sticks and watch the metamorphosis; within 10 days the green chrysalis would turn transparent and a black and orange butterfly would emerge.

“I like it because we get to release the butterflies after we hold them,” said Nathan..

Honoring Marilyn Merten

Family, friends, and elected officials gathered at Washington County Fair Park on Wednesday evening to pay tribute to long-time County Board Supervisor Marilyn Merten.

Merten was honored with a plaque that read: In honor of Marilyn Merten.

Celebrating her years of service to the citizens of Washington County and the Town of Polk as a County Board Supervisor, County clerk, Germantown School Board Member, Town of Polk Municipal Clerk, and Town of Polk Municipal Treasurer. As an avid supporter of the communities and people who she represented, her dedication to the ideals of public service were so greatly appreciated.

Marilyn Merten is recognized for her contributions as the Town of Polk Municipal Clerk and Municipal Treasurer, a Germantown School Board member from 1977 to 1998, the first female Washington County Clerk from 1994 to 2005, a member of the County Board Supervisors from 2008 to 2020, a member of the Washington County Historical Society Board from 2008 – 2018, and a member of the Agricultural and Industrial Society Board since 2008.  On behalf of a grateful County, we dedicate this permanent symbol of our gratitude and appreciation.

Former Washington County Board Chairman Ken Miller could not be in attendance and sent a note to be read at the event.

Dear Marilyn,   I am so sorry I cannot attend your retirement from the County Board.

Our paths have paralleled for quite some time starting with the Republican Party, through the years at the County up to the Ag-Industrial Society.

During those years we worked together on numerous projects, through some turbulence, but always came to a solution.

I was always impressed with your perfection no matter what. (Sometimes a bit annoyed as you know perfection was not one of my better traits). Whether it was grounds keeping, elections, minutes, rules of order and the list goes on. This was the case, even when personal adversity struck, you were always there.

Through all that, it has been and still is a pleasure to work with you. I wish you all the best and thank you for your tireless service to the people of the county.  God Bless, Ken Miller

Merten was humbled by the recognition. “I never expected anything like this… I just did what I did,” she said.

Baskin Robbins history in West Bend

As the Baskin Robbins / Dunkin store nears completion on W. Washington Street in West Bend we pause to look back when Baskin Robbins / 31 Flavors was first in the community.

Kathy Leisman Suchon was a teenager in West Bend when her parents, Ken and Shirley Leisman, opened the first Baskin Robbins Ice Cream Store in the West Bend Plaza.

“It was by the old Kohl’s Food Store in the mall on Main Street,” said Suchon. “On the other end of the mall was Alston’s clothing store and we were right in that middle by the garden area on the right-hand side. I remember the whole front and side of the store were all windows.”

Suchon also remembered a Ben Franklin in the strip mall and RadioShack, 842. S Main Street. (RadioShack filed bankruptcy Feb. 5, 2015. The store in the West Bend Plaza closed at the end of May 2015.)

“My mom and dad opened the Baskin Robbins in 1974 and we had it until 1978,” she said. “Right about the time we first opened you could buy a coupon for a $1 and it had four squares and each square was worth one scoop of ice cream. So, each scoop was a quarter which was pretty amazing,” she said.

Suchon’s brother was 14 years old when he worked at Baskin Robbins. He said minimum wage was $2 an hour when he started.

The many windows at the store became a marketing tool as Suchon’s mother came up with a clever plan.

“She would call the grade schools and elementary schools and they would have an art class come and paint murals on the windows; it was mainly during the holidays,” she said. “My mom thought it was neat to have the kids paint the windows and then for the next month the kids could bring their parents and show them what part of the mural they painted and then have an ice cream. My parents were very family focused and thought that was a neat program.”

In 1976 with the Great Ice Storm on March 6 and 7 the power went out at the store. “We had so many tubs of ice cream in the freezer and we didn’t know what to do,” said Suchon. “The National Guard was in town with headquarters based at Badger Middle School. My parents took all the ice cream over to Badger School and scooped ice cream for all the National Guard members that were there.”

Suchon said her parents got into the ice cream business because they really wanted to do something together. “They thought what is better than an ice cream parlor that brings families together and everyone is happy when they get ice cream and they just thought it would be really fun,” she said.

For a teenage perspective it was fun. “It absolutely was fun,” Suchon said. “We always had ice cream in the freezer at our house. Most of my birthday parties were at the store and my friends would love to come and be able to scoop their own ice cream.”

One of the interesting things about the franchise was the Baskin Robbins headquarters was is in Burbank, California. “It is warm there 12 months of the year and having a shop in Wisconsin was definitely different. Not too many people are thinking about ice cream when it is below zero, so that was definitely a challenge,” said Suchon.

Something funny Suchon’s mom always chuckled was the selection of flavors.  “Every month a lot of the flavors changed.  We had a bubblegum ice cream that was popular and a daiquiri ice that was popular. But my mom laughed because of all the different flavors of ice cream my favorite was vanilla and that is still true today,” she said.

The Leismans sold Baskin Robbins to a woman but within a year the store closed completely.

“Still to this day when I come back to West Bend, I visit the store site. I had a lot of fun memories with my mom and dad,” said Suchon.

Milton Kenneth “Ken” Leisman  Feb. 10, 1928 — Feb. 25, 2015. He was 87 years old.

Ken was born Feb. 10, 1928, in Oconomowoc, the oldest son of Mavis (Schirmacher) and Rev. Milton B. Leisman. Ken graduated from Columbus High School in 1946 and then enlisted in the United States Air Force, where he served as a Staff Sergeant in Japan and Germany. After serving his country, he attended Northland College in Ashland. While attending college, he met his future wife, Shirley Ann Holvick, whom he married on Sept. 8, 1951.

Ken graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Madison with a B.S. in Journalism in 1953. He worked as an advertising manager and technical writer, but his most rewarding job was owning and operating a Baskin Robbins Ice Cream store in West Bend. Ken loved playing cards, traveling in his RV, listening to big band music, watching Green Bay Packer games and spending time with his children and grandchildren. He enjoyed volunteering for the West Bend Communication Patrol and was honored with a Community Service Award in 1982. He was a lifetime member of the VFW. He is preceded in death by his wife of 59 years, Shirley Leisman.

Silver Spring Collision in West Bend sold to Crash Champions

It was 1996 when Joe Lamberty moved his business, Silver Spring Collision, to West Bend.  “This spot at 3000 W. Washington Street used to be home to the Golden Knight Supper Club,” said Lamberty.

In the late 1980s Art Von Schloedorn, Ernie Von Schloedorn’s son, had the property for a used car lot. At the time Lamberty owned a self-serve car wash up the street. “Art came in and said his dad wanted him to give up the car lot in West Bend and run one of the dealerships in Mayville,” he said.

Lamberty offered to buy the property and build a body shop; that was the start of Silver Spring Collision in West Bend.  “I knocked over the restaurant and we opened the body shop in April 1998,” he said. “I’ve been here ever since.”

At the time Lamberty’s neighbors included Young’s Royal Ford-Lincoln-Mercury Inc. across the street. “The self-serve car wash I owned is where the Russ Darrow Chrysler dealership is now. I sold that to Steve Kearns and he tipped it over and built Kearns Motor Cars and then sold it to Darrow,” said Lamberty. Kiddie corner was the old Devenport family farm, now home to Morrie’s Honda and down the street the Holiday Inn and later Fanta Suites.

Silver Spring Collision started as a 12,000-square-foot shop; a 13,500-square-foot addition was quickly built to the east. Lamberty also had a 2.5-acre parking lot out back.

On Tuesday, the office at the 30-bay autobody shop was operating at a NASCAR pace as members of the incoming team, Crash Champions, was setting up shop to take over.  “It has been a wonderful run and I get along good with the insurance companies and we kept growing and growing and now it is time for me to step back and let the younger generation take over,” said Lamberty.

At 69 years old, Lamberty said he “knew it was time.”

“I’d rather do this while I’m healthy and I still have some years where I can travel,” he said.

Choosing to work with Crash Champions came after a lot of research according to Lamberty. “My son and all the 14 employees will stay on board,” he said. “That’s what the beauty is with this whole deal; they are a standup company. We worked 10 months on this deal.”

Lamberty said the company is straight forward. “These guys are coming into this building and they’re making an investment into the employees and the community,” he said. “We were state-of-the-art but they are going to update that and run with it. They have a network of 50 shops and they’re on top of their game.”

Asked what was ahead for retirement. “I don’t know. I’ve got to decompress and tie up the deal here,” he said.

Questioned what was one of his most significant memories about running the shop. “In all these years, 24 years I’ve never had any vandalism, no theft and I only had two bounced checks,” said Lamberty. “That is phenomenal.”

Lamberty started his shop at 16th and Silver Spring in 1987. “I was renting various buildings in Butler and Brookfield and I ended up on Silver Spring running a body shop called Silver Spring Collision,” he said. “That serviced Bob Brown Nissan, Hobbs Honda, Schlessinger Toyota and Schlessinger Nissan.”

After 13 years in business Lamberty sold his business in Brookfield and the one on Silver Spring.  “I took two years off and when I wanted to get back in again I talked to the insurance companies and asked them which area I should target Washington County and that’s how I ended up out here,” he said.

Crash Champions announced September 1, 2020, its expansion into the Milwaukee, Wisconsin market with the acquisition of Silver Spring Collision Center in West Bend, WI.

The Lamberty family owned Silver Spring Collision, 3000 W. Washington Street, West Bend, since 1983 and it has been a family owned-and-operated facility for over 40 years.

With the addition of this facility, Crash Champions continues its rapid growth strategy and expansion throughout the United States with 40 locations in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio, and California.

“I’m excited about this location because it is a very nice well-equipped facility.  They also share our operational standards for high-quality repairs and great customer service,” said Matt Ebert, CEO of Crash Champions.  “This acquisition is another big step in our expansion as it marks our entry into the state of Wisconsin.”

On a history note:  According to Al Luedtke of West Bend the “Golden Knight was just west of the Harley-Davidson dealership which used to be Frontier Bowl.” Luedtke sold the Golden Knight in 1978 to Larry and Diane Block who named it Blocks Supper Club. They leased it to Dean Derge who turned it into a night club called City Limits.

Obituary Susan Martens, 69, formerly of West Bend

Susan Martens (nee Lockman), 69, of Newbury Park, CA passed away peacefully on August 28, 2020 after a brave fight with cancer.

Sue was born August 16, 1951 in West Bend, Wisconsin. She was preceded in death by her parents Robert and Margaret Lockman and older sister, Julie.

Sue is survived by her husband Jerry Martens, brother James (Marcia) Lockman of Eden Prairie, MN, niece Lindsay Lockman, nephew Robert Lockman and numerous cousins. Sue will always be remembered for her wonderful sense of humor and infectious laugh, which she maintained during her final days.

Sue graduated from West Bend High School in 1969. She attended the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and Milton College. She pursued a career with Wang Laboratories first in Milwaukee, WI then in Minneapolis, MN.

After marriage to Jerry Martens in 1980, they moved to the Los Angeles area where Sue worked first as a civilian contractor and then directly for the U.S. Navy. Sue was never able to discuss her duties with the Navy, however from some recognition awards we know her position was Air-4. OP Facilitator supporting the Target’s Flight Clearance Process.

The family is planning a private fall ceremony to celebrate Sue’s life. Memorials in Sue’s name may be sent to Fifth Avenue Methodist Church, 323 S. Fifth Avenue, West Bend, WI 53095 or Kettle Moraine YMCA, 1111 W. Washington St., West Bend, WI 53095.

 

Washington County veterans participate in Honor Flight Parade

Sixteen veterans from Washington County were among 175 veterans that gathered on Canal Street on Saturday, August 29 under the shadow of Miller Park to participate in the Stars & Stripes Honor Flight Parade. The event was held to recognize veterans in light of a canceled flight to Washington D.C.

The event got underway with the singing of the National Anthem by Vintage Mix from Milwaukee.

Milwaukee Police on Harley-Davidson motorcycles then led the parade followed by the Patriot Riders and Rollin’ Thunder motorcycle groups.

Veterans from Washington County that participated in the Honor Flight Parade are listed below

Daniel Barney            West Bend     Army  Vietnam/Vietnam

Robert Duehring       Kewaskum    Army  Vietnam/Vietnam

Thomas Farvour      Germantown       Army  Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Preston Jackson      West Bend         Air Force      Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Walter Kohler          West Bend        Army  Korea

Charles “Mike” McCormick    West Bend  Army  Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Walter Nowak        Slinger         Army  Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Tom Okruhlica        Jackson  Navy  Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Gordon Peszko       Hartford  Army     Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Gary Pichler           Colgate  Army           Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Arthur “Jim” Scherer  West Bend   Navy Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Mike Schreiber       West Bend        Navy Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Gerald Schwenke      Colgate          Army  Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Patrick Sharkey        Germantown Marines Vietnam/Vietnam Era

Lloyd Westerman    Kewaskum     Army  Korea

Chuck Woodhull   West Bend   Army     Vietnam/Vietnam Era

National Guard Testing Locations Closed for Labor Day

How serious is this pandemic if we are still observing holidays?

MILWAUKEE – The National Guard testing locations will be closed on September 7, 2020 in observance of Labor Day. The sites will be reopened and the testing will resume on September 8th, 2020. We would like to remind everyone to be safe this holiday weekend

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Sirens sound as Newburg couple celebrates 72nd wedding anniversary

Considering their age… the sirens that approached Friday night could be misconstrued for an emergency but the Newburg Fire Department rolled up to the driveway of Lucy and Norbert Carter to personally wish them a happy 72nd wedding anniversary. It could be the start of a Midwest tradition…. After a short panic and check of the pulse Norbert and Lucy welcomed the good wishes.

Lucy was 21 years old when she got married; Norbie was 18.

“We met at the Newburg centennial picnic,” said Lucy. It was July 27, 1947.

“I was there with my parents, standing on the merry go round with my little sister and he was looking at me.”

Norbert was with his buddies. “They were pretty wild,” said Lucy. “They were noisy.”

It did not take long and the pair were going out. Norbert picked her up in his black 1931 Chevrolet. The four-door had spoke wheels and there was white writing on the driver’s side and passenger doors. “Don’t spit the driver can’t swim” and “Peaches here’s your can.”

Lucy is almost 93.  Norbert turned 90 in April. Both vividly recall their wedding day August 28, 1948.

“We were married in the Newburg Holy Trinity priest’s house,” said Lucy. “I was Catholic and Norbert was Lutheran.”

“They wouldn’t marry us in the church,” said Norbert.

“And the bride could not have a sleeveless dress,” Lucy said.

Sitting in the couple’s driveway on Highway M on Friday night, both acknowledged the recent passing of Jack Eggers of Campbellsport. “He drove at my wedding,” said Norbert.

Black-and-white pictures of their wedding day are eased out of a large crisp white envelope. “I bought my dress up in Fond du Lac and that bridal shop, Edith’s, is still open,” said Lucy. “We all went into the priests house; only immediate family were allowed in.”

The couple first lived with Lucy’s grandmother. “Oh, and the rent was high,” said Norbert. “It was $15 a month. “There was no in-door plumbing. We had a hand pump for water and the toilet was up on the hillside.”

Three years after getting married the couple bought 1-acre of land from Lucy’s parents farm. “We started to build our own house in 1951 and we lived in the basement,” said Norbert. “I put tar paper over the top.”

Norbert laid all the block walls in the basement with the help of his brother. “The block were 12 inches and weighed 92-pounds apiece,” he said. “We poured the footings with a hand mixer that had a little electric motor on it. We wheeled it down in the hole on a ramp.”

“We both worked during the day and then we would come home at night and Norbert’s brother would dry mix the mortar during the day and we would eat supper and they would work on the roof half the night under the moonlight,” said Lucy.

“One night a neighbor complained, we can hear you pounding away,” said Norbert. “That was when I was putting shingles on the roof. Not a crack in those walls though….”

It was January 1951 when the couple realized their construction project would be put on hold. Norbert was drafted into the U.S. Army. He entered service in 1952. He spent 15 months and 22 days in Korea

“I never got to go to high school,” said Norbert. “I was put on the farm to help my uncle because he couldn’t get a hired man during the war.”

Norbert was one of seven boys in the family; four of his siblings were also in the service. “My dad was in World War I; my oldest brother was in the Navy during Pearl Harbor. Two of my brothers were in Germany, two of us were in Korea and my youngest son was in Desert Storm.”

Norbert went to Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania for basic training. That was followed by a stint in Washington and later he spent 17 days on a ship to Japan.

“We spent one night in Japan, got back on the boat and I spent the next 15 months and 22 days in Korea,” Norbert said.

Immediately stationed on the front line, Norbert recalls his orders.

“We were on night patrol and walked up to one area and were handed a steel vest and they said ‘put it on — this is the area where you need it’ and we walked some more and pretty soon we were up on Old Baldy,” he said referencing the site of five engagements during a 10-month span of the Korean War.

“For 32 days I helped build bridges while we were under fire,” he said. “There were some Army tanks on a couple mountains up there and we had to get them back for service work.

“The biggest bridge we had was 280-feet long and it was all steel treadway. We couldn’t work during the day because the enemy could see us and every day for the first five days the bridge was knocked out by artillery, so each day we had to tear it out and start over.”

Back home Lucy was working at Badger Meter in Brown Deer. “Most of the time I stayed with my parents. A neighbor man would pick me up and take me down to work where we made bullets,” she said.

Norbert and Lucy corresponded via letter. “It took 29 to 30 days when I mailed a letter to her and it was airmail; for her to mail a letter to me it took the same amount of time,” said Norbert.

 

One story about mailing a package to Korea involved a homemade hickory nut cake with frosting. “His mother sent the cake and it took weeks to get there and once they received it the frosting was all moldy,” said Lucy.

“The guys around me said, ‘We’re going to have dessert.’ We opened it up and it was green. In true soldier fashion, the fellas got some spoons and scraped the frosting off and ate the cake,” Norbert said smiling.

The letters Lucy received were censored. “The letters all had been opened and if they didn’t like something, they just cut it out,” said Lucy.

Upon his return Norbert said, “It was 19 days going over to Korea on a ship and it took 18 days coming back. Norbert was discharged in 1953 as a staff sergeant Section B in the Second Division Combat Engineers.

“We landed in San Diego, California. We came in on a ship and went under the Golden Gate Bridge and within two hours we went over the top on a bus and we were there two or three days and then bused to Camp Carson Colorado.”

“I drove all the way to Colorado to pick him up and bring him home,” said Lucy.

When Norbert and Lucy reunited at home things moved quickly. “The day we moved into the house, June 1955, was the day I brought home my first daughter,” said Lucy.

Over the years the Carters had four boys and four girls. Today their family has grown to 16 grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.

“I used to sew lots of clothes,” said Lucy. “We wore aprons and I had an electric sewing machine and got my material from JC Penny.”

Lucy credits her mother and grandmother for her skills, both sewing and in the kitchen. “The family liked my homemade noodles, homemade sweet rolls, and coffee cakes,” she said.

“And homemade bread,” said Norbert.

Both Norbert and Lucy tended a big garden. “Norbie has been called the Tomato Man,” said Lucy.

The Carters said the hard work they experienced throughout their lives is what they credit as the secret to a long and happy marriage.

Body found in Washington County

A body has been found in Washington County and the Washington County Sheriff’s Department is investigating. According to Sheriff Martin Schulteis the body was found Monday, August 24, 2020 in the Town of Addison. An autopsy is currently underway. Schulteis declined further questions regarding where the body was located, how it was found, or the gender. “This is all still under investigation,” he said.

More details will be released as information becomes available.

Building home to Rose Marie’s Hair Designers for sale

Watch for a For Sale sign to go up shortly at the corner of Chestnut and Main Street in West Bend as the building that is home to Rose Marie’s Hair Designers is on the market, 408 S. Main Street.

The property is listed by Adam Williquette, president of American Commercial Real Estate.

The building was constructed in 2002 and the parcel is priced at $239,000. Click HERE for details.

Prior to the hair salon moving in September 2011 the location was home to Morning Glory Coffee & Conversation owned by Marianne Olson. In September 2000, Morning Glory had been located across the street, 349 S. Main Street, in the cream city brick building when her delicious coffee and scrumptious homemade bakery outgrew the location.

The shop jumped kitty-corner to 408 S. Main where Marianne purchased a big coffee roaster and meticulously decorated for the ever-changing season.

The coffee shop which was later purchased by Mark and Tina Thull. The couple from Kewaskum bought the business in August 2008 but by December 2009 the Thulls were looking to close. After a brief hiatus they hired a new manager and reopened briefly in February 2010.

Prior to Morning Glory the southwest corner of Main and Chestnut was home to Rick Takacs and Meadowbrook Market.

Meadowbrook Market had fresh produce in the summer, pumpkins in October and Christmas trees in December. The corner store had an open concept and car-dealership streamers of colorful flags above the lot. The corner sign featured a farmer in a straw hat holding an ear of corn. The building was razed in April 2002.

On a history note: Remember her big dog that laid on the carpet at the entrance to Morning Glory Coffee shop. The dog was a 100+ pound Samoyed. What was its name?

Horicon Bank’s Shred Day is Saturday, September 12

Make your life more secure by shredding old documents and make your community better too. Horicon Bank, 1535 W. Paradise Drive, in West Bend will be collecting donations for the Wisconsin Honor Flight at its Shred Day event, Saturday, Sept. 12 from 10 a.m. – noon.

Two homes razed on W. Washington Street in West Bend

Two homes in the 2100 block of W. Washington Street are being razed to make way for a new two-story office building. The homes are being leveled to make way for a 6,334-square-foot commercial building located 2115-2121 W. Washington Street.

It was March 2020 when a site plan was reviewed for the new Oak Brook Dental, currently located at 1201 Oak Street, West Bend. Oak Brook Dental will occupy the upper level and the lower level will be built out for a possible second dental office pending approvals.

Zoning: The 0.71-acre lot is zoned B-1 Community Business District. Two driveways exist on the site and the new proposal will utilize the eastern most driveway connection to W. Washington Street.

A total of 24 parking stalls (22 standard parking and 2 barrier free parking stalls) are provided for the development. The parking requirement for a dentist\medical use requires 5 parking stalls per doctor and parking for employees based on the largest shift. Based on the parking calculations 28 stalls would be needed. The developer is requesting a parking exception for the reduced number of stalls based on the anticipated needs that the office will generate.

Lateral Service\Utilities: Sanitary sewer and water laterals will be extended from the existing mains W. Washington Street to serve the buildings. An apparent electric easement may exist along the property frontage and should be verified.

Grading\Storm Water Management: A storm water management plan has been submitted and reviewed for the development. Prior to the issuance of a building permit, the storm water management plan must be approved.

25th annual Boltonville Fire Department Street Dance is Saturday, September 12

The last big bash of the summer is Saturday night, September 12 at the Boltonville Fire Department. The Street Dance starts at 5 p.m. with food and refreshments. There is an $8 donation at the door to see Rebel Grace. Proceeds benefit the Boltonville volunteer Fire Department.

Celebrating women’s right to vote in Washington County

There was a large gathering outside on Veteran’s Plaza on Wednesday, August 26, 2020 as officials from Washington County gathered to honor the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment which granted women the right to vote.

Former State Assembly Majority Leader Pat Strachota was the guest speaker. Segments of her speech are below, Women Suffrage Centennial Speech.

“It was August 26, 1920 that the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, was finally ratified.

One hundred years ago the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution stated: The rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

This Amendment codified in law, for the first time that women, like men deserve all the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and this still holds true today.

Whistles and bells rang out in cities all across America acknowledging this historic day.

“Susan B. Anthony, is probably the best known suffragette. She was recruited by Elizabeth Stanton to travel and give many forceful speeches including her famous quote, “Failure is impossible” as well as this excerpt from her best known speech after her arrest for casting an illegal vote in the presidential election of 1872.

And I quote, “It was we, the people, not we, the white male citizen, nor yet we the male citizen; but we, the whole people, who formed the Union. And we formed it not to give the blessings of liberty, but to secure them, not to be the half of ourselves and the half of our posterity, but to the whole people – women as well as men. And it is downright mockery to talk to women of their enjoyment of the blessings of liberty while they are denied the use of the only means of securing them, provided by this democratic-republican government – the ballot.”

These were powerful words by a lady who was small in stature but large in her thinking.

A depth of gratitude is owed to these women and all the suffragists who were willing to voice their opinions, sacrifice their time and dedicate their lives so women could have the right to vote and participate in forming their government and communities.”

Hartford Lions Club accepts Eagle Scout Project | By Thomas Sweet

The Hartford Lions Club is heavily involved with vision-impaired people all over the world.

The Lion Club teamed with Boy Scout Aaron Haas, 14, of Slinger as he worked to complete an Eagle Scout project to build eyeglass collection boxes. This was designed to be coordinated with a Boy Scout doing his Eagle Scout Project.

Haas and his family met with leaders of the Lions Club and Aaron persisted in getting the project okayed by his troop, fund raising and bringing together a group of fellow scouts to work on the project.

The design of the boxes was modified slightly and the final project looked very sharp. The boxes will be placed in high-traffic areas like U.S> Post Offices, credit unions, schools and libraries. Total man hours in the project hit 150.

Highlighted in Lions Club yellow and blue colors, the boxes are sure to raise public awareness of what the Lions Clubs stand for as well as increase the collection of used eyeglasses, which are then refurbished and sent to undeveloped countries all over the world.

Aaron is entering Slinger High School where he has been part of Student Council and National Honor Society.

He will be a class officer his freshmen year. He was on the Yearbook Committee and Forensic team all three years of middle school.

With the Scouts, he earned Life Rank, went through National Youth Leadership Training, got confirmed at Still Waters UMC, and became a member of Brotherhood of the Order of the Arrow.

Aaron also donated $890 to the Lions’ Club that represents fund raising that did not go to the actual project. This was all warmly received by the Lions Club organization.

Aaron gave a fantastic recount of the entire project and the Lions Club expects to see him going a long way in life. Many thanks for a job well done.

Halloween store to open in former Shopko building in West Bend

The big white storage pods sitting in the parking lot of the former Shopko, 1710 S. Main Street, in West Bend are filled with costumes and Halloween displays as the empty big box store will temporarily be home to Spirit Halloween.

There are 16 Spirit Halloween stores in Wisconsin. The store in Fond du Lac is currently open.

According to its website:

Spirit Halloween has one single goal, to deliver the very best Halloween experience possible to all of our guests. We are the largest seasonal Halloween retailer in the world and the premier destination for everything Halloween. Since being acquired by Spencer Gifts, LLC in 1999, we have grown from 63 locations to over 1,300 across the United States and Canada and service the globe on SpiritHalloween.com.

Emily Putnam with Spirit Halloween said the store in West Bend will likely open in a couple weeks. The store’s web page lists “planned to open September 3.”

The stores normally stay open through November with big sales after Halloween, October 31.

The Halloween supply store will only take up about a third of the front of the former Shopko building.  This is the second year Spirit Halloween has operated out of the old Shopko, which officially closed in June 2019. The last day for the Shopko in West Bend was April 15, 2019.

Trick or treat hours across Washington County.

Town of Addison 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 25.

Village of Jackson 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Slinger 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Germantown 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31. (Ben from the clerk’s office said, “Trick or treat will go on even if it snows…. like it did in 2019.” He said Germantown received 6 inches of snow. Remember that??

Village of Kewaskum 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31.

Village of Richfield 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.

West Bend 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.

Ghost sign discovered during demolition of Fleet Farm

As the final chapter of the old Fleet Farm, 1637 W. Washington Street, in West Bend comes to a close there was a brief glimpse of history caught as the demolition neared its final stage.

The northeast corner of the building is the oldest part of Fleet Farm. Barely visible on the dirty white brick is an arrow symbol pointing to the left with the words entrance. That same sign can be seen in the submitted photo below. The blocked windows can also be seen in the video on the back side of the building.

According to Terry Becker with You Know You Are from West Bend….

“the northeast portion of the old Fleet & Farm building dates back to March 1, 1949, the date the old “West Bend Pilot” newspaper was sold to brother investors Alan and Robert Pick along with their nephew Andrew J. Pick Jr.

The new endeavor, “The Pilot Press Inc.”, combined newspaper publishing and commercial printing all under one new roof built on W. Cherry (now Washington) Street during their first year at the helm. Tragedy also struck that first year when the young, vibrant Andrew Pick Jr. age 35 died of a cerebral hemorrhage on January 20, 1950 just three days after becoming father to his new baby daughter.

The grueling newspaper portion of the business merged with the West Bend News in 1954. The commercial printing portion of the business continued until 1959 when it was sold to Alfred Ramsthal’s Serigraph Sales. Equipment and files were moved to Serigraph’s new plant on Indiana Avenue, thus ending the final chapter of the “Pilot.”

The vacant building would soon become home to West Bend’s “Fleet & Farm.”

A couple recollections from the old, old store.

Andrea Peterson – Riding into town with Dad, stopping a Tri Par for gas and candy cigarettes then on to Fleet Farm and holding my breath in the stinky garden/lawn chemical aisles. Backing your cart all the way down an aisle or going 3 aisles over so you can get your cart near the checkout. Decades later shopping there for my kid’s Christmas present when the seasonal toy shop opened.

Matt Smith – Small squared off room was the ammo room. I helped expand it in 2001 when we started to fill CO2 tanks and did fishing line spooling. Also, the NE corner rumor had it was a former machine shop. The original blueprints for the build when it turned to fleet farm were in a crawl space up in the SW corner of the store. Many memories in that building.

Letter to the Editor |     | By Kraig Sadownikow

I recently took a look at a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center that came out the first week in August.  It revealed why voters support either President Trump or Joe Biden.

The survey listed various important traits of a quality candidate such as leadership, policy positions and temperament.  It also listed a few attributes independent of performance such as party affiliation.

A full 72% of those intending to vote for President Trump say they support him for quality-based reasons while 38% support him simply because he is Republican or for other undisclosed reasons.  It is pretty powerful that a super-majority of supporters have clearly taken the time to research the President and recognize tangible job performance-based reasons for endorsing him.

Most startling to me, however, is the leading reason supporters of Joe Biden are choosing him as their candidate.  He is not supported for what he has done, he is not supported for what he plans to do.  He is not even supported for who he is.  He is being supported for who he is not.  56% of Joe Biden’s support comes because he is not President Trump.  To me, this means virtually anyone could be on the Democrat ticket in November and would get support of 56% of Democrat voters.  This is a scary statistic that hopefully causes real concern to the American people and acts as a gut-check for Democrat supporters.

Not being President Trump may help Joe Biden get elected.  Big deal.  Once in office though, don’t we all want someone there whose supporters voted for them because they had great ideas, was a quality leader, and because they believe in the American people and values?

Electing a President because they are not someone else may feel good at first but is this really good for the United States?  Ideally the candidate I support for valid reasons will win.  If not, at a minimum, I would like the candidate that does win to have support for who they are and what they plan to do and not be supported just because they are not someone else.

I understand there are those who do not support President Trump.  If you feel that way, don’t vote for him.  Similarly, if you do not support Joe Biden for who he is, please don’t vote for him either.  It is insulting to our Republic, our history, and is dangerous for all Americans.

Kraig K. Sadownikow

City of West Bend

Disclaimer: Opinions and letters published in http://www.washingtoncountyinsider.com are not necessarily the views of the Editor, or Publisher. The http://www.washingtoncountyinsider.com reserves the right to edit or omit copy, in accordance with newspaper policies. Letters to the Editor must be attributed with a name, address and contact phone number – names and town of origin will be printed, or may be withheld at the Editor’s discretion. During the course of any election campaign, letters to the editor dealing with election issues or similar material must contain the author’s name and street address (not PO Box) for publication.

Asteroid Might Hit Earth

The likelihood of this asteroid hitting earth is roughly the same likelihood of someone under the age of 70 dying of COVID-19 in Wisconsin.

Amid a pandemiccivil unrest and a divisive US election season, we now have an asteroid zooming toward us.
On the day before the presidential vote, no less.
Yep. The celestial object known as 2018VP1 is projected to come close to Earth on November 2, according to the Center for Near Earth Objects Studies at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
Its diameter is 0.002 km, or about 6.5 feet, according to NASA’s data. It was first identified at Palomar Observatory in California in 2018.
NASA says there are three potential impacts, but “based on 21 observations spanning 12.968 days,” the agency has determined the asteroid probably — phew! — won’t have a direct impact, let alone bring Armageddon.
The chance of it hitting us is just 0.41%, data show.

Man Retrieves Laptop From Pig

Not all heroes wear capes.

The man was sunbathing naked at the Teufelssee in west Berlin, a popular and perfectly legal practice in the German capital as part of what is known as FKK, or Freikörperkultur (free body culture).

The man’s pursuit had a happy ending when he got his laptop back.

The man’s pursuit had a happy ending when he got his laptop back. Photograph: Adele Landauer/pixel8000

The wild boar, sightings of which have become increasingly common, had apparently spotted a pizza being eaten by other bathers. It seized a yellow bag containing the man’s laptop, probably believing it to contain food, and was chased by the man into the undergrowth.

“Because the bag contained his laptop, he gave it his all, even though he was in his birthday suit,” explained Landauer.

The boar’s flight was slowed by a cardboard box in its path. The man clapped his hands and hit the ground with the stick, prompting the boar to drop the laptop.

Another witness said: “When he returned from the forest, everyone applauded him.”

The Weed Worries the Heart

Huh. Who would have thought that lighting a plant on fire and inhaling the smoke might cause health problems? Where have we seen that before?

Cannabis is bad for the heart and may trigger heart attacks and strokes, doctors have warned.

The American Heart Association (AHA), who reviewed the available evidence, now recommend avoiding cannabis to protect the heart.

In a scientific statement, it said smoking cannabis has some of the same harms as tobacco, which is known to be a leading cause of death worldwide.

Research has shown the recreational drug may have health benefits — but smoking cannabis has been linked with a slew of damaging heart problems.

Chemicals inside the drug can cause heart rhythm abnormalities within an hour of smoking, studies show.

The toxins can alter blood pressure, heart rate and trigger inflammation, all of which are underlying culprits of heart disease and strokes.

The AHA warning applied to people who use the drug recreationally, as well as and for medicinal purposes.

Bo Black Gone

Bo Black, who was the legendary powerhouse behind Summerfest for years, has passed away. I must have been hiding under a rock, because I didn’t know this:

Black became a Playboy cover model in 1967, after attracting a magazine scout’s eye while she was just 21 years old and a cheerleader at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Black appeared on the cover of the September 1967 issue of Playboy, despite refusing to pose naked inside the magazine
Black appeared on the cover of the September 1967 issue of Playboy, despite refusing to pose naked inside the magazine

Black posed for the scout – in town looking for co-eds to feature in the upcoming college issue – while wearing a short brown skirt and yellow turtleneck sweater, earning $25 for the trouble.

Black, a Catholic who went to mass daily, said that she didn’t tell her parents what she’d done because her ‘mother would have had a fit,’ she told the Arizona Republic in 2018.

The jig was up when someone from Playboy called Black’s home because they’d liked her photo and wanted her to pose for the cover.

Black said that her parents finally agreed to let her participate in the Playboy shoot as long as she kept her clothes on.

That was how she wound up being featured in the now iconic September 1967 Playboy cover, wearing a green-and-white jersey and matching knee socks, while holding a football helmet under one arm.

She received $100 as payment for the cover shoot, but could’ve made $5,000 if she had agreed to pose naked for the magazine’s centerfold – which she refused to do.

‘Are you kidding?’ I wanted to be a nun!’ she told the newspaper.

Anyway, Godspeed to someone who did so much for Wisconsin.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Hartford City Hall addresses five cases of COVID

It was July 10, 2020 when officials at Hartford City Hall confirmed three cases of Covid-19 linked to a family who worked for the City.

“One particular case was three members of a family who work for us in different departments,” said City administrator Steve Volkert. “They came to work with it, they did not catch it here. They were all tested and sent home and never worked a day after that. They have mild cases and are recovering quickly.”

Volkert said the City conducted its own contact tracing per CDC guidelines. “We tested those people who had been within 6 feet and those who spent 15 minutes with the employees and the results came back negative,” Volkert said.

“We had two others work in the same department and those tests came back positive. The City did contact tracing and everyone else also came back negative.”

The City of Hartford, according to Volkert, monitors employees daily who have direct contact with the general public including the Rec Center, the aquatic center and the Jack Russell Memorial Library.

“All employees have their temperatures taken before they get to work, they wear masks, they are behind plexiglass, and we have not had any other case of people having symptoms,” said Volkert. “We anticipate the five individuals will be back to work next week after 14 days of quarantine and no symptoms for three days prior to coming back.”

Volkert said if any of the employees show signs of symptoms they will not be allowed back until they can clear three days without symptoms.

Following the confirmed cases Volker said all department heads and all departments at Hartford City Hall were made aware. “We’ve always had precautions in place to test before you come in, test when you get here, and wear a mask if you’re in public,” he said.

Volkert said one person was a morning employee at the aquatic center and that person would not have had contact with the public. “As soon as we found out, that person was taken off the schedule, no other staff reported symptoms,” said Volkert.

To protect the community, Volkert said all touch surfaces were heavily sprayed at Hartford City Hall, Hartford Rec Center and the aquatic center. “We sent a note to the Wash/Oz Health Department that the ‘Office has been heavily sprayed by electrostatic sprayer with non-fuming, non-standing tri-chloride-based sanitizer,’” said Volkert.

“We never closed City Hall and we cleaned the entire area and very quickly did all the contact tracing and took care of everything,” said Volkert. “We made sure all the residents were safe.”

 

 

West Bend Parks Commission approves changes regarding dogs in City parks

There was a lively discussion Thursday night, July 23, 2020, as the West Bend Parks Commission took another look at an ordinance regarding dogs in City parks in West Bend.

Currently dogs can be on a 6-foot leash on the Riverwalk, in Old Settlers Park and Vest Pocket Park.

District 8 alderwoman Meghann Kennedy wanted to expand the list of parks to include all City parks. That idea was then amended to include parks but not Regner Park or Lac Lawrann Conservancy, park buildings, otherwise posted areas or in the park during special events.

Discussion went round and round several times. A couple of hot topics included people who take their dogs off leash, those who fail to pick up waste or do pick up waste and then leave the bag on the trail or in the park, how to police allowing dogs but not during special events, dog waste and urine in the parks or on soccer fields and volleyball courts.

Following a couple votes a measure to change the ordinance passed by a vote of 4 – 3. The revised ordinance would also include a statement about dog owners picking up and removing animal waste.

Those voting in favor of the change included Mike Chevalier, Meghann Kennedy, Steve Hoogester, and Jim White. Those dissenting were Allen Carter, Mike Weston and Mike Staral. The amended ordinance must still go before the West Bend Common Council for approval.

Update to Dogs in City of West Bend Parks

Ordinance to be updated:

20.07 (6) Animals (c) (Rep. & Recr. Ord# 2832 – 5/14/2019) Designated On-Leash Dog Areas. Dogs shall be allowed in the following parks, or the designated area within a park, but shall be restrained by a leash with a length of six feet or less.

  1. Ridge Run Park – entire park.
  2. Glacier Blue Hills Recreation Area – Ice Age Trial only.
  3. West Bend Riverwalk – sidewalk/trail portion only.
  4. Old Settlers Park – entire park.
  5. Vest Pocket Park – Sidewalk portion only.

Update:

Dogs shall be allowed in all city parks, except for prohibited park areas. All dogs must be on a leash no longer than 6 feet at all times, and under owners’ control -unless in Rolfs dog park leash-free area. Any pet owner who fails to control their pet, create public nuisance, or disturb

others may be asked to leave. All pet waste must be picked up and disposed of in garbage receptacles. Bags, scoops, or other implements for the removal of pet waste must be carried by any person bringing a pet onto park property.

Prohibited Areas: Dogs are not allowed at special events, park buildings or picnic shelters, within children’s playground areas, beaches, or athletic fields.

Why: The updates to this ordinance will allow the City of West Bend parks to come in line with both Washington County Parks (which allow dogs in parks on 6-foot leash) as well as Wisconsin State Parks (that allow dogs on 6-foot leash in parks except for prohibited areas) like we are listing above.

West Bend Police release more details on man’s body found in Milwaukee River

A couple more details are being released regarding the body pulled Tuesday morning from the Milwaukee River, 900 block of N. Main Street, in West Bend across from the old West Bend Company.

West Bend Police said, “Investigators have identified the victim and the family has been notified. Although the investigation is on-going, we do not suspect any danger to the public.”

According to officials the man is Justin E. Bentrup, 40, of Colgate.

The initial police statement from Tuesday, July 21, 2020 is below.

On Tuesday, July 21st 2020 at 8:48 AM a citizen called the police department to report a body floating in the Milwaukee River.

West Bend Fire Department Technical Rescue and police officers located a deceased victim in the river adjacent to the 900 block of North Main Street.

The victim is an adult male. The victim’s body did not have any obvious signs of trauma. Officers did not find any identification on the victim or in the immediate area.

Remodeling update at Wallace Lake Supper Club

A unique opportunity this week as Kevin Zimmer provided a rooftop tour of Wallace Lake Supper Club. The former Walden – A Supper Club is undergoing a serious remodel / expansion.

The colorful facade was unveiled as contractors pulled back the exterior siding.

Kevin and Amy Zimmer purchased the restaurant on Wallace Lake in February 2020. “We are committed to keeping the restaurant open while making improvements, yet preserving the Wisconsin supper-club feel,” said the Zimmers.

During a review of every nook and cranny, Kevin Zimmer managed to find a hidden treasure above the ceiling on the second floor on the southwest side of the building.

“We’re really trying to identify how old the building is…. I thought it was the early 1930s…. but then you find things like this…,” said Kevin Zimmer.

Zimmer climbs a ladder and reaches back above the ceiling tiles and into the rafters and pulls out a pair of brown, pointy, well-worn shoes.

Sewn on the inside of the shoe is a label for Leonard, Shaw and Dean; a manufacturer of men’s footwear in Middleborough, Massachusetts. “This shoe style was made from 1885 – 1910,” said Zimmer. “The shoes were together with this bottle; a 12-ounce prescription bottle and I found it ironic they were placed between the joists.”

According to lore “long ago people purposely placed shoes in rafters in between walls as they added onto a building. This represented good luck and wellness.”

County Highway Department honors Ben Falter            By Ethan Hollenberger

This week a county highway plow truck is parked in the county courthouse parking lot along STH 33 in West Bend. The truck was used by Ben Falter, who passed after a short battle with cancer.

Ben was an employee of the Highway Department for the 22 years and was a very hard worker with a lot of knowledge and a great skill set on many pieces of equipment. If you’ve seen the Highway Department’s wheeled excavator at work around Washington County over the years, there’s a good chance Ben was in the cab working the controls.

Ben also spent countless hours behind the wheel of a double-wing plow truck keeping US Highway 45 clear and safe during the winter months so the community can get to work and back home safely to our families.

Ben will be missed and his spirit around the Highway Department will never be replaced. The county extends its sincere condolences to Ben’s family and friends. We’re very thankful for everything that Ben did for Washington County over his many years with us.

New town board chair in Town of Barton

A nice salute to Richard Bertram who stepped down July 21, 2020 as chairman of the Town of Barton. A resolution was read in his honor.

Resolution 20-004

A RESOLUTION TO COMMEND RICHARD L. BERTRAM FOR HIS SERVICE AS TOWN CHAIR FOR THE TOWN OF BARTON

WHEREAS, Richard L. Bertram has served the Town of Barton as Chairman for 16 years commencing June 2004

WHEREAS, Richard L. Bertram has served the Town of Barton for 11 years as Town Supervisor commencing April 1993 through June, 2004.

WHEREAS, Richard L. Bertram has chosen to retire effective July 21, 2020.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Town Board of the Town of Barton, Washington County, Wisconsin, on behalf of the citizens of the Town of Barton, we appreciate and express our gratitude to Richard L. Bertram for his service and support to the community in his capacity as Town Chairman and Chair for the Planning Commission, and wish him the best of health and happiness in his retirement.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Town Clerk of the Town of Barton, Washington County, Wisconsin, forward a copy of this resolution to Richard L. Bertram.

PASSED and ADOPTED this 21st day of July 2020:

Bertram served a total of 27 years on the town board. At 73 he said it was time to retire and travel.

“I can let somebody younger than me take over,” he said.

Following the resolution, a small celebration was held with cupcakes. The new interim chair is Kris Turner. She will fill the remainder of Bertram’s term which will be on the April 2021 ballot.

The Town of Barton needs to fill a supervisor vacancy. Any resident interested should make their intentions known to the board.  The Town has a 60 – 90 days to fill Turner’s term as supervisor which expires in 2022.

Jim Geldreich receives Wisconsin Award              By Carroll Merry

Jim Geldreich, center, chairman of the Washington County Republican Party, receives the Wisconsin Award during the state GOP convention held July 10, 11 in Green Bay.

The award recognizes the county in the state that performs at the highest level of membership retention, community events involvement, event organization, media interaction and maintaining an independent campaign office.

Presenting the award are, at left, Andrew Hitt, chair of the Republican Party of Wisconsin, and, at right, Jesse Garza, chair of the RPW County Chair organization. WCRP was a finalist for the award in 2019.

Horicon Bank announces new Senior Vice President | By Grace Bruins

Horicon Bank recently announced the promotion of Sue Garman to Senior Vice President.

As an active member of the West Bend community, Garman has served on the Big Brothers Big Sisters Board of Washington County, the Board of Washington County United Way and continues to serve as a member of the West Bend Noon Kiwanis, the West Bend Music for Youth Board member, and a member of the SSADH Association Fundraising Board.

Garman said community involvement is one reason she enjoys working for Horicon Bank.

“I enjoy working for an organization whose decisions are made locally and who supports the communities in which it operates,” said Garman. “Employees at Horicon Bank are proud to work here because of our commitment to our communities.”

President Fred F. Schwertfeger said Garman’s dedication to customers and streamlining efficiencies within Horicon Bank have made her a valuable asset to the team.

“Sue has been instrumental in improving applications at the bank,” said Schwertfeger. “She exhibits Horicon Bank’s mission to be a caring banker who values our communities, customers and associates.”

Horicon Bank has 20 locations in 14 communities and has been serving Wisconsin since 1896.

What does Briggs & Stratton bankruptcy filing mean for Germantown facility

It was October 9, 2018 when ground was broken on Highway 167 in Germantown on a new 706,000-square-foot industrial distribution facility for Briggs & Stratton Corporation. The development was part of the future Gateway Corporate Park.

Today, July 20, 2020, Briggs & Stratton Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and officials in the Village of Germantown offered some insight.

Village President Dean Wolter said he had not heard the full story when we called but offered the comment below.

“I’m sorry to hear for a company that has been around as long as Briggs it has come to the point it has to file for Chapter 11. I hope it works out best for them. As far as how it impacts Germantown, currently that building is leased from Zilber Property Group so the owners of that building will remain the same. The ownership group does not change; it is a Briggs & Stratton facility but it is leased.

Steve Kreklow is Village Administrator in Germantown. “It’s too early to tell any specific impacts at this point but the building is actually owned by Zilber Property Group and it is leased to Briggs & Stratton. It is a shipping and distribution facility that has a lot of value and regardless of the ownership structure at Briggs & Stratton I think there is a lot of value in that facility that someone will be utilizing in the near future.”

Questioned whether the Chapter 11 filing made Kreklow nervous, he said he is kind of concerned about the economy in general. “When you look at individual businesses there is always ups and downs but as long as the overall economy is healthy our communities and tax bases are solid and we are able to continue to provide services. The biggest concern is where is the economy going from here and what is the recovery going to look like. We are still seeing a lot of residential construction and the housing market seems to be solid yet and I hear there is a lot of optimism on the commercial side that business owners and investors believe the economy will bounce back quickly. Time will tell.”

Below is the Briggs & Stratton bankruptcy announcement courtesy Market Watch

Briggs & Stratton Corp. BGG, -5.26% said Monday it has filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and reached an agreement to sell most of its assets to KPS Capital Partners. The Milwaukee-based company, which makes gasoline engines for outdoor power equipment, said it has secured debtor-in-possession financing of $677.5 million from KPS and its existing lenders to allow it to continue normal operations ahead of the closing of the deal. “Over the past several months, we have explored multiple options with our advisors to strengthen our financial position and flexibility,” Chief Executive Todd Teske said in a statement. “The challenges we have faced during the COVID-19 pandemic have made reorganization the difficult but necessary and appropriate path forward to secure our business.” Shares fell 27% premarket, and are down 88% in the year to date, while the S&P 500 SPX, +0.84% has fallen 0.2%.

The 140-acre Germantown Gateway Corporate Park site was acquired by Zilber Property GroupSM (“ZPG”) in 2018 and, in addition to the 706,000 square foot Briggs & Stratton facility, is capable of accommodating an additional 1.4 million square feet of institutional-quality industrial development.

Nicole Pretre wins Milwaukee Business Journal Chief Marketing Officer of the Year Award | Carrie Sturn

Nicole Pretre, Vice President of Development at Cedar Community, has been named among the Milwaukee Business Journal’s 2020 Chief Marketing Officer of the Year award winners. The award recognizes the important work of those in senior marketing positions in southeastern Wisconsin.

Pretre is the executive leader of the marketing, sales, and fundraising teams of Cedar Community, where she and her teams have transformed the vision and messaging of Cedar Community’s brand proposition. Under her leadership, the marketing team has won six national Aster Awards for marketing and advertising over the past three years, as well as a national Telly Award for video content.

“Nicole’s creative vision and strategic acumen, combined with her broad industry experience has been invaluable to Cedar Community,” said Lynn W. Olson, Chief Executive Officer. “Nicole is truly a 360-business professional who understands how to creatively, strategically, and effectively craft and deliver messaging to propel and support revenue goals across key functional areas.”

Within the greater West Bend community, Pretre serves on the Board of Directors for both the West Bend Area Chamber of Commerce and United Way of Washington County. She is a 2014 graduate of the West Bend Leadership program and has continued to be active in various volunteer and mentorship roles in the community.

Additionally, she was awarded the 2017 Champions of Change Emerging Leader Award through the Volunteer Center of Washington County. Pretre, who is also a Credentialed Professional Gerontologist, is regularly consulted as an issue expert and thought leader in senior living, and is a local, state, and national speaker and educator in senior living and healthcare.

Prior to her professional career in long-term care services, Pretre was an Emmy-nominated television journalist and producer, who holds numerous awards from the Associated Press, the Wisconsin Broadcaster’s Association, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

To be eligible for the award, candidates had to be based in Milwaukee, Waukesha, Walworth, Washington, Ozaukee, Racine, and Kenosha counties and held their current role for at least two years. Candidates were selected from a nomination process with judging conducted by an independent panel.

Tracking down some Fleet Farm history

The Cyclone fencing is up around the old Fleet Farm and Tri-Par building, 1637 W. Washington Street, in West Bend.

Rick with Robertson Brothers Environmental was kind enough to allow a last look inside the building. He said there has been a bit of a delay because the electricity inside the building hasn’t been turned off yet.

Demolition crews will drop an excavator on site this Thursday or Friday and then next Monday the gas tanks will be removed.

Terry Becker with You Know You Are from West Bend…. posted some great history about the original northeast corner of the Fleet Farm building. His story is below …

West Bend History is Fleeting!

The northeast portion of the old Fleet & Farm building dates back to March 1, 1949, the date the old “West Bend Pilot” newspaper was sold to brother investors Alan and Robert Pick along with their nephew Andrew J. Pick Jr.. The new endeavor, “The Pilot Press Inc.”, combined newspaper publishing and commercial printing all under one new roof built on W. Cherry (now Washington) Street during their first year at the helm. Tragedy also struck that first year when the young, vibrant Andrew Pick Jr. age 35 died of a cerebral hemorrhage on January 20, 1950 just three days after becoming father to his new baby daughter. The grueling newspaper portion of the business merged with the West Bend News in 1954. The commercial printing portion of the business continued on until 1959 when it was sold to Alfred Ramsthal’s Serigraph Sales. Equipment and files were moved to Serigraph’s new plant on Indiana Avenue, thus ending the final chapter of the “Pilot.” The vacant building would soon become home to West Bend’s “Fleet & Farm”!

WIAA Votes to Continue with Fall Sports

I’m surprised, I admit, but good for the WIAA.

MADISON, Wis. — The body that oversees Wisconsin high school sports recommended Thursday that schools offer fall sports but delay start dates by several weeks as the coronavirus surges across the state.

The Wisconsin Interscholastic Association Board of Control voted 8-3 to approve pushing back the start date for girls golf, tennis and swimming to Aug. 17. Girls and boys cross-country also will start on that date.

Sports that create a higher risk of virus transmission and infection, including football, volleyball and soccer, will start the week of Sept. 7. Whether the WIAA will offer any postseason state championship tournaments remains unclear. Board members said they just want to get the fall seasons started.

The delay doesn’t make much sense to me. I don’t see how delaying football practice a few weeks does anything to mitigate the spread of the virus, but at least they are supporting moving ahead with fall sports. Good for them.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

In-person absentee voting starts Monday, July 20, 2020

Below is a preview of the ballot for the August 11, 2020 partisan primary. The winners in the primary will advance to the November 3, 2020 election.

Please note, you can only vote along party lines in this August 11, 2020 partisan primary.

Below is the second half of the ballot that will affect six voters in the City of West Bend.

A couple other bullet points to keep in mind:

– After filling in voter party at the top of the ballot (Democratic, Republican, or Constitution) then voters need to mark the candidate along party lines that they want to vote for in the individual races.

– Expected turnout in West Bend for the August 11, 2020 partisan primary is anticipated at 5,000 voters.

– In-person absentee voting begins in Washington County on Monday, July 20, 2020.

– On July 22, 2020 the Federal Court will rule on in-person absentee voting and whether it can start only two weeks before a primary. (Yes, the clerk understands the ruling will be issued after in-person absentee voting begins in West Bend/Washington County)

-Voters should bring their driver’s license or an official ID to the polls or City Hall if they are attempting to vote in-person absentee before the close of business Friday, August 7, 2020.

-The clerk’s office in West Bend will be from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

-On Friday, August 7 hours will be extended until 5 p.m.

Executive Director of Miller Park District says Department of Revenue to request Miller Park Surplus be returned

On Friday, July 10 a story posted on WashingtonCountyInsider.com about how the “Wisconsin Department of Revenue overpaid the Southeast Wisconsin Professional Baseball Park District $4.3 million. The district executive director asked to return the money and the Department of Revenue told him not to.

Today, Sunday, July 12, 2020 the Executive Director of the Miller Park District, Mike Duckett, sent an email saying the situation has been resolved and money will be returned to the Department of Revenue and hopefully to taxpayers.

Mike Duckett <mduckett@millerparkdistrict.com>

Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2020 6:45 PM

To: Judy Steffes <judy@washingtoncountyinsider.com>

Subject: Miller Park District

Hi, Judy:

I noticed your recent article in the Washington County Insider regarding the Miller Park District and the “over payment” of $4.3 million to the District from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue.

I received a telephone call from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue yesterday (Friday, July 9, 2020).  The Department has indicated that they “will be sending the District a letter asking that the District return the $4.3 million to the Department.”

The District will be pleased to comply with this request.  It sounds like the funds will subsequently be distributed to the five counties, as originally hoped and intended.

Thanks,    Michael R. Duckett, P.E.

Executive Director

Miller Park District

Miller Park

One Brewers Way

On Monday, July 13, 2020 we will check with the Department of Revenue and inquire about the surplus timeline and how it plans to distribute the money to the five counties, including Washington County, in the Southeast Wisconsin Professional Baseball Park District.

Calls have also been place to officials in Washington County as they were the ones who initially pushed to have the money returned.

See story below from July 10, 2020.

It was 1996 when taxpayers in Washington County joined Milwaukee County, Ozaukee, Waukesha, and Racine counties in paying 0.1% sales tax to the Southeast Wisconsin Professional Baseball Park District.

Miller Park statement

The sales tax would help pay for the construction of Miller Park. That five-county sales tax was promised to end in 2019 or 2020.

The Associated Press reported:

“After 23 years, the five-county sales tax that paid for construction of Miller Park in Milwaukee will end March 31, 2020. Members of the board that oversees the Southeast Wisconsin Professional Baseball Park District decided unanimously Tuesday to end the tax. Gov. Tony Evers signed a bill last November to end the tax by Aug. 31. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the tax has collected about $605 million.”

One note however, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the “Wisconsin Department of Revenue overpaid the Southeast Wisconsin Professional Baseball Park District $4.3 million. The district executive director asked to return the money and the Department of Revenue told him not to.

Washington County Executive Josh Schoemann issued the following statement:

Last fall, the legislature finally ensured the baseball district would end this tax in 2020. Act 28 was intended to ensure the Department of Revenue could properly sunset the tax.

Washington County taxpayers have waited too long for this tax to sunset and now Madison bureaucrats cannot figure out how to end the tax. Mike Duckett and the Park District Board are trying to do the right thing by returning the money to the taxpayers.

If the Department of Revenue cannot figure out how to properly return the money, first thing next session, legislators should introduce a bill which would require the overpayment returned to the taxpayers of the five counties in the most efficient way possible.

In 2017 the Miller Park District put out a question-and-answer statement:

How much sales tax is collected each year? In 2016, the District received $30 million in sales tax revenues.

What does the Miller Park sales tax cost each resident of the five-county District each year? In 2016, it is estimated that each resident of the five counties, on average, contributed approximately $11.

Mary Gumm is now banking on retirement

Mary Gumm is a familiar face at First Citizens Bank, formerly Guaranty Bank, in West Bend.

Pleasant, helpful, and now after more than 45 years in the industry Gumm is retiring.

“It was 1974 and I was a senior in high school when I started at the bank,” said Gumm.

Sitting behind her desk in her corner office, drive-thru traffic passing by her window, Gumm recalled the day her counselor, Orv Sommers, walked into homeroom. “He said does anybody need a job and I raised my hand and said I do and he said, ‘Come with me.’”

“I sat in his office and he said, ‘You need to be at Guaranty Bank right after school for an interview for a teller. Go home, get dressed up and go to the bank.’”

“I walked into the branch on S. Main Street and talked to Dave Ponath. He asked me a couple questions including when could I start and he told me to come back tomorrow, I would work 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays.

“We only had savings accounts at that time; we didn’t have checking,” said Gumm.

“My friends were flipping burgers at McDonald’s and I had this job and I loved it. I was making, I think $4 an hour. Originally I wanted to be a teacher but I loved working with numbers.”

Nine months later Gumm’s dream job came to an end. “Mr. Ponath called me into his office and said he was going to have to let me go because we were closing on Mondays and Thursdays,” said Gumm.

“I was heartbroken and I went into the back in the kitchen area and I was just crying,” she said. “I remember Nanci Rauch came and asked me why I was sobbing and I said I was being let go because there wasn’t enough work for me. She grabbed my hand and said, ‘You’re not leaving.’”

The two marched into the manager’s office and Rauch laid it on the line. “She said she wasn’t going to tell anybody she was pregnant but she told Dave and said she wasn’t going to come back and then he called me in and said, ‘Never mind; forget what I told you. As soon as you’re out of school you’re going to be full time.”

“To this day if it wasn’t for her… I wouldn’t be here,” Gumm said.

Through the years Gumm has worn just about every hat from teller to accounting to almost a manager while she was still in her teens.

“I remember when they moved me to the Richfield branch which was next to the hardware store on the east side of Highway 175 in the strip mall,” she said. “There used to be a pharmacy in back and now the Piggly Wiggly is there.”

“They wanted to make me a manager but I was only 19 years old and you had to be 21; so, I was a head teller,” she said.

Soon Gumm was back in the West Bend office. “I did the mortgage processing. It involved legal descriptions and I did it all on an electric typewriter. It was an IBM Selectric with the little ball and a bottle of whiteout at my side.” Gumm laughs at the memories.

From there Gumm operated out of a branch at Northridge in Milwaukee where she worked in the personal loan department. In 1984, following the birth of her second daughter, Gumm returned to West Bend.

The biggest change Gumm has seen over the years has been the focus on sales in banking.

Asked if she would miss it, Gumm said she would miss the interaction with the people.

While there have been a lot of changes within the building, Gumm said the past four decades have also brought a lot of change to S. Main Street as well.

“Kohls food store use to be on the corner by Decorah and there was a pharmacy. I think the two stores were connected at one time…,” she said. “Ben Franklin was here, the JC Penny, the sewing store and Alston’s; it was a women’s clothing store. They were located here in the West Bend Plaza strip mall and in Cedarburg.”

Gumm remembers the Sentry grocery across the street along with Kuhn’s Liquor in the Decorah Shopping Center and when the Greyhound Bus pulled in for pickup at George Webbs. “People always used to sit along that side of the building,” said Gumm pointing to the south side of Webbs. “There was also Toy World which is where Main Street Café is.”

Gumm also remembers when the bank was built. “When this place was being built, the Domino’s building to the south was Burger Hut and we went in there temporarily,” she said. “This was 1973 and I started in 1974.”

One of the memorable lessons Gumm learned in banking came from her dad. “He would take $100 from me each month and tuck it aside,” she said. “That is how I learned to save. He said, if you don’t have it you won’t spend it.”

Gumm will wrap up her career at the end of July. “It’s a good time because I have my health and I will be able to spend more time with my grandkids,” she said.

Update on Highway 60 construction from Jackson to 5 Corners in Cedarburg

It was April 20, 2020 when Highway 60 was closed from Eagle Drive (Piggly Wiggly) in Jackson to Highway 181 by 5 Corners in Cedarburg.

The extensive summer project included milling off the top two inches of roadway, and laying four new inches of pavement. The paved shoulder width will also be increased to six feet, and bypass lanes and right turn lanes at intersections will be added or extended as needed.

In addition to the resurfacing, the State will be reconstructing the intersection of STH 60 and CTH Y with a roundabout to address traffic safety concerns.

Kurt Flierl is the Construction Project Manager with the DOT.  He provided a brief update on the project.

Weather has had minimal impact on department contractor schedule.

Roundabout construction at the intersection of County Y is on schedule.

Contractor is nearing the halfway point of 90 calendar day requirement to reopen the intersection.

Intersection grading and curb and gutter construction at the remaining intersections will be complete by the end of July

Asphalt paving and pavement repairs began in June.  All lower layers of asphalt pavement with the exception of pavement at new roundabout construction, will be placed in July.   Asphalt pavement construction will then resume in mid-August as roundabout construction is completed.

Bridge deck replacement at WIS 60 over Cedar Creek is complete.  Department contractors will complete grading and guardrail installation at the bridge approaches in late July.

WIS 60 remains closed to through traffic, and the intersection of County Y will be closed through August.

The department appreciates the patience and assistance of local community in adhering to signed detour and local alternate routes as construction progress continues.

The entire stretch of road from Eagle Drive to Five Corners will be closed to through traffic during construction. A detour route is posted. Local and emergency access will be maintained throughout the project.

Questions should be directed to Kurt Flierl at WisDOT. His contact information can be found below. Kurt Flierl P.E., WisDOT Project Manager Phone: (414) 750-3085

Washington Co. Dist. 22 Supervisor resigns

There is an opening on the Washington County Board after Dist. 22 supervisor Rock Brandner resigned.

Brandner served on the Washington County Board since April 2016. He was reelected in April 2020 and represented the Germantown and Richfield areas.

Washington County Sheriff Martin Schulteis said, “I am grateful for the opportunity to have worked closely with Rock on the Public Safety Committee. His years of dedicated service to our community has made Washington County a better place for all.”

Washington County is now looking for applications from District 22 to fill the unexpired Board term ending April of 2022.  Interested candidates must reside in District 22, attend County Board meetings including regular meetings held on the second Wednesday of the month at 6 p.m. and attend regular standing committee meetings.

The Washington County Board of Supervisors is vested with powers of local, legislative character to act upon matters of general government, public safety, transportation, health and human services, court services, land use, planning and the conservation of land resources as delegated to the counties of Wisconsin by State Legislature.

To apply:    Email applications to Don Kriefall, County Board Chairperson at don.kriefall@co.washington.wi.us Subject: District 22 Applicant – Last Name

Mail or drop off applications to P.O. Box 1986, 432 E. Washington Street, West Bend, WI 53095  Attn: Don Kriefall – District 22 Candidate

Applications may include a resume and statement of interest but at a minimum, must contain an address and brief biography.  The deadline for applications is Wednesday, July 22, 2020, at 4 p.m.

Water refill stations reopen at Kroger Pick ‘n Save stores in West Bend

If you haven’t stumbled upon this yet… the water refill stations are open again at the Kroger Pick ‘n Save stores in West Bend. The self-serve bottle refill machine was shut down in April/May because of Covid.

 

Memories of the old Fleet Farm in West Bend

The old Fleet Farm building, 1637 W. Washington Street, was constructed in 1961. The open-span warehouse was famous for its farm supplies, narrow aisles, and advertisement that read, “Not available in West Bend or Clintonville.”

After the old Fleet Farm closed Nov. 17, 2019 a contractor was brought in to liquidate the shelving, lighting, and fixtures. That’s when this walkthrough took place. Neighbors shared some of their memories.

Tammy Matter-Clyse Kinda heartbroken 💔

Remember picking out fishing poles n tackle to go fishing with my dad, dreaming over hunting schtuff, then got my first car….oooo! Had big, shiny dreams for that ’76 Cutlass! And when we got horses…..it was over with! Never, ever forget standing in the aisle and picking up the red n white lead rope for my first pony, Colonel ♥️♥️♥️

Thanks for being a trusted staple in the West Bend community. Thanks for the memories….there are many!

Rick Klamik Parking in the lot and seeing President Reagan’s motorcade go down the street. He had lunch at the Washington House and was coming from Hartford and a visit to the Broan factory

Yvonne Tackes Sitting in the lot outside for over an hour while they tried to find the cat food.

Brad Kuhn The “dated” bathroom 😝

Di M Man Sad! My dads 2nd home!

Kristin Altendorf They had the best malted milk balls. Strange I know but they were!

Dean Pok Loved the buckets catching water when it rained.

Sharon Brand Narrow aisles and the small-town feel

Cyndi Rieger-Peffer Best angel food, chocolate covered peanuts and licorice!

Julie Newhauser It will forever be the smell of the new rubber tires!

Jerry Bohmer Always liked the smell of the new tires lol

Lori Rieger The smell of tires.

Dan Kindler Not going to miss that store for a second

Jeff Watzig Crashing into other people’s carts in the narrow aisles!

Marge Breuer Kufahl A bigger store was needed but the new one’s location isn’t ideal and they don’t seem to have a lot of the expected items in stock.

Andrea Peterson Riding into town with Dad, stopping a Tri Par for gas and candy cigarettes then on to Fleet Farm and holding my breath in the stinky garden/lawn chemical aisles. Backing your cart all the way down an aisle or going 3 aisles over so you can get your cart near the checkout. Decades later shopping there for my kid’s Christmas present when the seasonal toy shop opened.

Laurie Wagner The smell when you first walked in!

Melissa Collett When I worked there a deer tried to run in the exit. 😳

Karen Wahlgren I worked with school supplies and we couldn’t get rid of yellow folders or tablets that year because the kids said you were different.

Dawn Bachman Bugalski Shannon Walsh Our second home growing up. The threat of having to go back to school shopping for clothes there still haunts me! 😂 😂 😂

Postponed 2019 Washington County property taxes due July 31, 2020 | By Jane Merten

The Washington County Treasurer would like to remind taxpayers that their postponed/second installment 2019 property taxes are due on or before July 31, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we strongly encourage you to mail your payment to the Washington County Treasurer.

If you are paying by check, please make sure that the numeric and written portions of the check are the same and that your check is signed otherwise the check will be returned, and this could result in interest and penalty charges, if postmarked after the due date. Postdated checks will not be held and will be returned to you. Checks should be made payable and mailed to the Washington County Treasurer, PO Box 1986, West Bend, Wisconsin, 53095. If you would like a receipt, please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the County Treasurer strongly encourages you to mail your property tax payment. Please do not wait until the last week of July. Mailing your payment early helps make sure the USPS postmark is timely and provides greater opportunity to correct errors before the due date deadline. “The cost of missing the July 31 deadline is severe. Under state law, interest and penalty charges are 1.5% per month back to February 1, (10.5% in August 2020) and continue to accrue until the taxes are paid in full. It is imperative to pay property taxes on time to avoid delinquent charges.”

You can also pay your property taxes online using a credit card or electronic check through Point & Pay. Please be advised that Point & Pay will charge you a convenience fee of 2.39% of the amount that you put on your credit/debit card or $1.50 for an electronic check. Please visit our website at www.co.washington.wi.us, click on Departments, then County Treasurer, and Pay Real Estate Taxes Online. You will need your tax parcel number as well as the amount due.

I you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Treasurer’s office at 262.335.4324.