Boots & Sabers

The blogging will continue until morale improves...

Tag: Tony Evers

Evers’ Odd Excuse

If he had to keep issuing a mask mandate due to the changing nature of the pandemic, then why did he keep issuing the same order? Wouldn’t a changing problem require a changing solution?

Evers argued that he could issue multiple health emergencies because of the changing nature of the pandemic. The mask order first took effect in August and Evers extended it four times since then, most recently on Feb. 4 immediately after Republican legislators repealed it.

Evers to Dole out Billions of Dollars Without Any Oversight

Sure. No chance for corruption or misappropriation there. Uh huh. I don’t know why we bother having checks and balances or oversight of anything. Why don’t we just let Evers have the same exclusive control of all government spending?

Gov. Tony Evers outlined his initial plans on Monday for some of the roughly $3 billion in federal COVID-19 stimulus funds headed to Wisconsin, saying hundreds of millions of dollars will flow to small businesses, infrastructure and continued pandemic response. The governor also vetoed a bill on Monday that would have given GOP state lawmakers more say over how the federal funds are spent.

 

Wisconsin is set to receive about $5.7 billion under the latest federal pandemic stimulus, with $3.2 billion earmarked for state government. The remainder of the funds will go to local governments and non-governmental programs.

 

Speaking at a small business in Milwaukee, Evers said he plans to spend $600 million on supporting small businesses, $500 million on continued pandemic response, $200 million on infrastructure and $50 million on aid for the Wisconsin tourism industry. The governor said his administration is working to get the funds disbursed as quickly as possible.

 

“At the end of the day, we’re still battling a pandemic and all the uncertainty that comes with that — workers and business owners are still filled with worry, families are still struggling to make ends meet,” he said.

 

Evers said the money dedicated to infrastructure development will include a “significant investment” in broadband expansion, something he and GOP lawmakers have agreed should be a major priority. The governor said announcements about which specific programs will receive funding in each broad category are to come. He noted the new business loans will “build on” an existing pandemic grant program that has sent money to about 53,000 businesses in Wisconsin.

Evers’ Big Lie

Well, one of them, anyway.

Perspective by Dan O’Donnell

 

It’s not just that Governor Evers is lying about why his Department of Health Services (DHS) undercounted COVID-19 deaths in the state’s nursing homes by nearly 1,000; it’s that he is so obviously and provably lying.

 

When asked this week why DHS officials quietly upped the number of nursing home deaths from 1,956 to 2,927, Evers rather perplexingly claimed that state investigators simply couldn’t figure out where thousands of COVID victims lived.

 

“Our local folks got lots of death certificates and death investigations that just had a street name on it,” he said.  “How do we know that is a nursing home?”

 

This just isn’t true.  If it were, then the State of Wisconsin hasn’t managed to find a home address for a staggering 37% of the people who died of COVID-19 over the past year.  That’s either terrifying incompetence or, far more likely, sickening dishonesty.

Evers Budget Includes Over $1.1 Billion in Tax and Fee Increases

Nothing says, “I care about Wisconsinites who lost their livelihoods in a pandemic” like jacking up taxes.

In summary, the changes included in the Governor’s budget would increase net taxes by $1,020,728,000 ($464,824,000 in 2021-22 and $555,904,000 in 2022-23) and would increase net fees by $17,162,700 ($7,172,900 in 2021-22 and $9,989,800 in 2022-23). In addition, it is estimated that measures included in AB 68/SB 111 to enhance the collection of current taxes would generate an additional $78,031,700 ($38,745,800 in 2021-22 and $39,285,900 in 2022-23).

Governor To Continue Arbitrary Rule

Take notice that at no point has the governor given any guidance on when he would lift a mask order. What metric do we have to hit? This has long since stopped being about the science. It is about a governor who enjoys his usurped power and doesn’t want to give it back.

As some states rollback their mask mandates, Governor Evers defended his emergency orders as tools that rely on science. The state supreme court is considering whether he has the authority to continue issuing emergency orders.

 

“I also am a realist…the supreme court is thinking about what goes on in this world and of course they will have the last say. But at the end of the day, it is important that people wear a mask,” the governor said.

Evers Continues Spending Spree After Reneging on Promise to Close Juvenile Prison

Remember when Evers ran on closing Lincoln Hills immediately? That was three years ago and now he wants to build a new facility at $1.4 million per inmate to do it. The ACLU was outraged at a Supermax prison costing $122,000 per bed to construct. How are we spending $1.4 million per bed for a medium security facility? It is almost like he is holding kids hostage as he pays off political supporters in Milwaukee and Madison with our money. Almost…

The spending plan also revives a stalled plan to close the Lincoln Hills School for Boys and Copper Lake School for Girls, a youth prison north of Wausau that lawmakers voted in 2018 to close after years of assaults on staff and teen inmates.

 

Evers wants to spend $45 million on a new juvenile facility in Milwaukee County for 32 teen offenders and another $70 million on a juvenile treatment center at Mendota Mental Health Institute in Madison.

Evers Spends Projected Surplus, and Then Some

Jinkees

Gov. Tony Evers’ biennial budget proposal fulfills many Democratic priorities with big spending increases, but Republicans have raised concern that the $91 billion proposal would almost entirely drain the state’s coffers — by close to $2 billion — and leave Wisconsin in a more precarious financial position down the road.

 

The state is projected to have a nearly $2 billion surplus in its general fund by the end of the year, but Evers’ projected budget, which includes $1.6 billion in new tax revenue from marijuana, big manufacturers and the wealthy, still reduces that to around $143 million by mid-2023.

Remember that the surplus is just projected. It may be more. It may be less. But either way, Evers wants to spend it all and raise taxes to boot.

And this is possibly the dumbest statement I’ve read today:

“It’s not necessarily inappropriate to draw down a big chunk of your reserves when you’re facing a once-in-100-years pandemic,” Wisconsin Policy Forum research director Jason Stein said. “You don’t have the reserves just to put them on a wall and admire them, but at the same time … you have to think about what’s going to be sustainable for the state budget because some of these challenges are not just going to evaporate either.”

A projected surplus is not “reserves.” Stein suggests that the surplus is some sort of rainy day fund. It is not. It is projected surplus revenue because tax collections were higher than expected and/or spending was less than expected. That money could be rolled into the next budget, used to pay off debt early, or it could also be given back to the people because we didn’t need to spend it. Evers just wants to spend it.
Then Stein goes on to suggest that it might make sense to spend it because of the pandemic. But the mere fact that we have a project surplus tells us that the government has sufficient money for expenses without drawing from any rainy day fund. While the pandemic impacted thousands of people and businesses, the government did just fine. The fact that we had a pandemic should not be used as a lazy excuse for more government spending.

Governor Evers Offers Liberal Wish List

Whatever. It is an aspirational list from a lefty governor trying to grab headlines instead of actually govern. He knows that most of this stuff is a non-starter. He just doesn’t care. He needs the pot legalization to pass first so that the legislators are high enough to pass the rest of it.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Gov. Tony Evers called on the Republican-controlled Legislature Tuesday to bolster funding for K-12 and higher education and reform the state’s criminal justice systems, while delivering a state budget with $1 billion in tax increases and liberal policy priorities that GOP leaders promised to quickly kill.

[…]

Evers also proposed numerous measures Republicans are certain to reject, including allowing front-line workers to collectively bargain, which would partially repeal the Act 10 law passed a decade ago; legalizing recreational marijuana; banning the private sale of firearms; accepting the federal Medicaid expansion; and increasing the minimum wage.

His budget also would increase the legal age to vape or smoke tobacco from 18 to 21; cap enrollment in school choice programs; and allow families of fourth graders to visit state parks for free.

State employees would receive a 2% pay increase in January and another 2% raise in 2023, similar to what they got in the current budget.

Did you see what I put in bold in the excerpt? Yeah… no.

“ineffectual and uninspiring”

That’s about right.

Gov. Tony Evers and his administration passed a milestone at the start of the year — the halfway point in his four-year term as governor. Two words come to mind in assessing his term thus far — ineffectual and uninspiring.

 

[…]

 

If Evers is to make a better grade for the second half of his term as governor, he will need to continue to work to find ways to forge compromise with the Legislature, which will require shelving some of his goals and ideals. He also needs to work at projecting confidence. Those are pillars of effective leadership.

 

— Kenosha News

Evers Vetoes COVID Compromise Bill

Evers gonna Evers.

In the hours after Wisconsin lawmakers Friday afternoon passed the state’s first bill to address COVID-19 since April, Gov. Tony Evers vetoed it.

 

The bill, which has ping-ponged between both chambers of the Legislature over the last month as lawmakers made changes to the plan, finally came to rest at Evers’ desk — but the version that made it there was one the Democratic executive said Republicans “knew I wouldn’t sign.”

 

[…]

 

But Assembly Speaker Robin Vos and Senate Majority Leader Devin LeMaieu slammed Evers’ decision in a joint statement, countering that “it appears Governor Evers cares more about his own power than the people of Wisconsin.”

That’s about right. I’ve bolded the two key provisions that Evers doesn’t want.

In its current form, the bill would have prevented health officials from barring gatherings in places of worship, given the Legislature oversight of the distribution of federal funds that are allocated to Wisconsin related to combating COVID-19, not allowed employers and health officials to require vaccinations against the virus and provide liability protection for businesses and others tied to COVID-related claims.

It would also have covered COVID vaccinations under the SeniorCare program for elderly individuals; allowed the Legislature’s powerful budget panel to transfer up to $100 million in certain appropriations for COVID expenses; and broaden open enrollment options for students seeking in-person education, among a host of other things.

 

Evers Extends Despotic Rule

Good for the legislature for finally acting. The Despot on Mendota responded as one would expect a despot to respond.

About an hour after Assembly Republicans voted to strike down Gov. Tony Evers’ emergency order and mask mandate, the Democratic governor issued a new, identical measure to maintain a statewide mask rule.

 

Evers’ new order marks the latest in an ongoing battle between the governor and state Republicans, who control the Legislature, over the use of a statewide mask mandate — one of the governor’s last remaining tools aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19, which has killed nearly 6,000 people in the state.

 

With a new order, Republicans may be forced to start the process of voting down the measure all over again, which one GOP Senator has already said he plans to do. The most likely outcome appears to be an eventual court decision. The Wisconsin Supreme Court has yet to rule on a challenge to the governor’s mask mandate.

It’s not about the masks. For all of the supporters of the governor using endless emergency orders to order people to wear masks because you agree that we should all wear masks, remember that he could also order everyone to NOT wear masks even if you want to. The point is that we should not allow one man to hold that much dominion over us.

Legislature must end Evers’ arbitrary rule

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News yesterday.

The Legislature had belatedly awoken from their slumber to take action to reassert our representative form of government by ending Governor Tony Evers’ latest emergency declaration. While much of the media is aping the rhetoric from the Democrats that it is an effort to end the mask mandate, it is about much more than that. It is about our very system of government and whether or not we will live under a representative government that reflects the consent of the people or under the arbitrary power of a single man.

 

When the pandemic began, we were beset with incorrect information that projected the deaths of tens of millions of Americans if the government did not act immediately. While those projections proved to be incorrect, in the moment the threat justified the use of an emergency declaration to take immediate steps to mitigate the effects of the pandemic. An emergency declaration is a legal provision that allows the governor to make immediate decisions and react quickly in the case of a natural or man-made disaster. Emergency declarations are not intended to be permanent, but simply a tool to allow immediate action until the Legislature can convene and develop a response in the normal course of representative government as prescribed by our state Constitution. We are now almost 10 months into a series of emergency declarations under which our representative republic has been suspended and laws are being written and enforced on the authority of a single man living in a mansion on Lake Mendota. Under these emergency declarations, Governor Evers has closed businesses, changed election laws, suspended civil liberties to assemble, forbidden people to leave their homes, suspended accountability rules for education and other government bodies, and doled out tens of millions of dollars to individuals and businesses without any oversight. And, yes, Evers has ordered all Wisconsinites to wear masks.

 

The Legislature has now had time to meet to develop and pass legislation to respond to the ongoing health concern of COVID-19 and yet Governor Evers continues to issue emergency declarations and govern as if he is imparted with that divine knowledge and right that our previous rulers assumed. The fact that the governor disagrees with the policy choices of the Legislature in response to COVID-19 is not a reason to abandon representative government. Nor should the citizens of Wisconsin surrender our civil liberties to the arbitrary will of a single man.

 

These principles are rooted in the very foundation of our nation and our state. Our system of government was established under the principles that all people are created equal and that we are all equally flawed. We are humans, after all, and imbued with all of the passion, bigotry, avarice, jealousy, ignorance, stupidity, as well as love, compassion, honor, nobility, intelligence, and kindness that is the natural human condition. We are all a swirling mess of contradictions and subject to following our worst instincts.

 

If we are all equal, and all equally flawed, then why would any human surrender his or her natural rights and liberty to the arbitrary will of another? But since such surrender is necessary for the protection of individual rights, we establish governments as the least worst option to protect those individual rights. Those governments were established to reflect the will of the people through representation so that no single man or woman would ever have arbitrary power over another, but only wield power through the consent of the governed.

 

That is why our government is structured to have three coequal branches and an elaborate system of checks and balances to keep any branch from ruling supreme. That is why it takes the consent of two branches of government, the legislative and the executive, to pass a law. That is why citizens can appeal to the judicial branch if they think their rights were violated by a law enacted and enforced by the other two branches. Our government is specifically constructed so that it is difficult to wield power over the governed without their consent being obtained through multiple sources.

 

All of this representative government is thrown away when we allow our governor simply to bypass it through endless emergency declarations. Wisconsin is currently living under the rule of one man and will be so until the Legislature reestablishes normal order and representative government. This is about our right to govern ourselves under the constructs of our state Constitution or abandon it for the arbitrary rule of the governor. This is about our very liberty. And no, it is not about the masks.

Jay Weber is reporting this morning that after more analysis, the Assembly Republicans has determined that the repeal bill passed by the Senate has some flaws. The Assembly will be writing a different version and then, after passing, they will need to go into the reconciliation process with the Senate.

What is telling to me about all of that is that in all of the time that these emergency orders have been in place and the legislature was in stasis for most of last year, nobody worked on this. Nobody did the homework, wrote drafts of bills, discussed the strategy, debated the process, or anything else. It appears that the legislative Republicans truly did sit on their duffs all year and just now started to put some work into protecting our rights. This is despite repeated sternly-worded press releases and public statements last year that they were very concerned for our rights and our businesses. That is truly disappointing.

Well, they are off their duffs now, but all of the bluster and activity means nothing if they don’t accomplish anything. They need to get this done.

Bureaucracy Shifts From Slow to Stop

If you thought that the Evers Administration couldn’t be any slower in making decisions in this emergency, they are suspending work.

MADISON – The state advisory panel recommending when Wisconsin residents should get the COVID-19 vaccine is pausing work while the Evers administration gathers more information on how President Joe Biden’s vaccine strategy will affect the state.

 

The hiatus, which could last weeks, also comes while the distribution of vaccine doses is ramping up; it will likely take months to provide shots to everyone already eligible.

 

Wisconsin is in the middle of distributing vaccine doses to residents in the first and second phase of the state’s rollout, which includes frontline workers, teachers and people over the age of 65 — more than 1 million people.

Legislature must end Evers’ arbitrary rule

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. I wanted to title it “It’s Not About the Effing Masks,” my I didn’t think my editor would go for that. Go pick up the whole thing, but here’s a part:

These principles are rooted in the very foundation of our nation and our state. Our system of government was established under the principles that all people are created equal and that we are all equally flawed. We are humans, after all, and imbued with all of the passion, bigotry, avarice, jealousy, ignorance, stupidity, as well as love, compassion, honor, nobility, intelligence, and kindness that is the natural human condition. We are all a swirling mess of contradictions and subject to following our worst instincts.

 

If we are all equal, and all equally flawed, then why would any human surrender his or her natural rights and liberty to the arbitrary will of another? But since such surrender is necessary for the protection of individual rights, we establish governments as the least worst option to protect those individual rights. Those governments were established to reflect the will of the people through representation so that no single man or woman would ever have arbitrary power over another, but only wield power through the consent of the governed.

 

That is why our government is structured to have three coequal branches and an elaborate system of checks and balances to keep any branch from ruling supreme. That is why it takes the consent of two branches of government, the legislative and the executive, to pass a law. That is why citizens can appeal to the judicial branch if they think their rights were violated by a law enacted and enforced by the other two branches. Our government is specifically constructed so that it is difficult to wield power over the governed without their consent being obtained through multiple sources.

 

All of this representative government is thrown away when we allow our governor simply to bypass it through endless emergency declarations. 

Speed Limits and Laws

What a truly idiotic statement.

“It is important for people to remember that masks save lives,” the governor said. “It is not about individual liberty, as others would say. If some of those arguments would be in place, I would expect the Assembly and the Senate to be sending me legislation getting rid of speed limits on our highways so that liberties to go 100 mph aren’t constrained. Obviously that’s ridiculous, and getting rid of this mask mandate falls within that category.”

First, notice how cavalier the governor is about your individual liberty. Second, notice how he accepts that the legislature would have to send him legislation about changing speed limits, but doesn’t make the connection that the legislature should have to act to enact a mask mandate. Evers is equating a hypothetical policy difference with a dispute over him acting unilaterally.

Vaccinating Wisconsin

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. Since I hammered on Evers for his poor administration of the vaccine rollout last week, I thought it behooved me to offer a few ways to improve it.

Last week this column was highly critical of Governor Tony Evers’ administration’s utter incompetence in managing the administration of the COVID-19 vaccine. Another week has passed, and Wisconsin has dropped from 40th to 43rd of the 50 states in the number of doses administered per 100,000 citizens. An old boss once told me to never bring him a problem without at least one solution, so here are a few suggestions that Governor Evers could do to improve his failing administration.

 

First, Governor Evers needs to take ownership of the decision-making process. Just last Wednesday, the state vaccine advisory subcommittee voted to approve which Wisconsinites will be included in Phase 1B – the second group of Wisconsinites who will be eligible to receive the vaccine. Now that the subcommittee has approved it, the full committee will need to review the plan. If the full committee decides that they want to modify the eligibility, then it will go back to the subcommittee for more work. If the full committee votes to approve Phase 1B, then the subcommittee and full committee will begin work on Phase 1C and eventually Phase 2. The vaccine has been available for almost seven weeks and Wisconsin still has not decided who will be in the second wave. That is entirely too slow. If this is truly an emergency, then Governor Evers needs to act like it. Governor Evers should get into a room with the committee, advisers, and other important stakeholders and not leave until all of the phases are determined. These are decisions that can, and should, be made in an afternoon.

 

[…]

 

Third, the overriding focus of vaccine distribution and administration should be to put needles into as many arms as possible. It is an emergency, right? In an emergency, speed of execution is more important than accuracy. As General George S. Patton famously quipped, “a good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week.”

 

That means that while clinics should prioritize the distribution according to the 1A, 1B, etc. phases, the first priority should be to empty the refrigerators of vaccines as quickly as possible. Ideally, the time between when a clinic receives an order of doses and when they are out and need to order more should be less than 48 hours. It is better for a vaccine to go into the arm of someone in Phase 1C instead of sitting in storage for two days.

Where are the vaccines?

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News last week. The numbers have changed a bit, but the issue remains.

After Governor Tony Evers failed the unemployed of Wisconsin with his inept management of unemployment claims, he is compounding Wisconsin’s misery with his failure to administer the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine. What is more infuriating is that when questioned about it, Evers blusters and obfuscates with all the indignation of a career bureaucrat unacquainted with accountability.

 

The numbers evolve by the hour, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of last Friday, Wisconsin has administered 169,803 doses of the vaccine. Only 2.6% of the population has received one dose; 0.3% are fully vaccinated. Wisconsin ranks 40th out of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in rolling out the vaccine on a per-capita basis.

 

The numbers are important. Wisconsin had received 437,900 doses of the vaccine as of that date. That means that Wisconsin has only administered 39% of the doses it has been given and 268,097 vaccine doses are sitting in refrigerators all over Wisconsin. Last week, Governor Evers admitted that his administration would be unable to begin inoculating the general public until June – over five months from now. It is a disgraceful admission of failure given with the banality of an indifferent government bureaucrat. One must delve into some gritty details to understand why the vaccine rollout is so lethargic in Wisconsin. One cause is that the Evers administration has been too slow in making decisions about how to roll it out. The dates are important.

 

Thanks to the federal government’s Operation Warp Speed, we were expecting the approval of one or more vaccines as early as September. The process for distribution would follow the traditional federal path whereby the federal government marshals supplies while the states are responsible for the details of distribution.

 

With this knowledge, Evers’ Department of Health Services created a subcommittee in early October to decide the strategy and priority list for vaccine distribution. After two months of deliberation, the 17-member subcommittee finally decided on Dec. 10 that the first group of people who should be in Phase 1A were to receive the vaccine first. The first Pfizer vaccine was approved on Dec. 11.

 

But that was just the first group. Then the subcommittee went to work on the next group: Phase 1B. After over a month, they had the proposed list available for public comment on Jan. 12. That very same day, the CDC gave guidance that states should open up vaccinations to everyone over the age of 65.

 

This subcommittee still needs to finalize Phase 1B before moving on to Phase 1C, Phase 2, etc. These are decisions that could be made in an afternoon. While Wisconsinites are suffering and being told that there is a medical crisis, Evers’ bureaucracy moves at its own pace – oblivious to the travails of the citizens it serves.

 

Meanwhile, the DHS is hoarding some doses to prevent them from being administered to the “wrong” people. The DHS is holding back distributing doses to pharmacies because they want to make sure there is enough for second doses. Meanwhile, the CDC advised that there is no need to hold back and fewer Wisconsinites are able to get their first dose.

 

As somewhat of an aside, it is also telling that there is a significant dip in vaccinations on the weekends and holidays. On New Year’s Day, for example, only 110 vaccines were administered in the entire state. If this is truly a pandemic emergency, they are sure not acting like it.

 

When confronted for his administration’s failures, Evers blames the federal government for not giving the state enough doses (despite having administered less than half of the doses available); blames Republicans; makes vigorous, if unsubstantiated, proclamations about the competence of his government; and refuses to accept any responsibility for his administration’s failures. However, despite his accusations and deflections, the simple truth is that Evers has failed to administer the doses Wisconsin has already been given.

 

Evers’ administration of the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine has been too slow, too bureaucratic, and too lazy. While Wisconsinites are being asked to forgo their livelihoods, upend their lives, and accept a retardation of civil rights in response to a pandemic, Governor Evers and his administration are behaving like it is just a another day at the office.

Evers Installs Lobbyist As New Health Secretary

The oxygenating churn of the swamp.

MADISON – Wisconsin’s incoming top health official isn’t saying whether she will step away from decisions affecting the health care clients she represented as a lobbyist.

 

Karen Timberlake next week will become interim health services secretary. She will replace Andrea Palm, who is stepping down to take the No. 2 post in President-elect Joe Biden’s Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Timberlake served as Wisconsin’s health secretary from 2008 to 2011 under Democratic Gov. Jim Doyle and in recent years has focused on health care issues as a lobbyist with Michael Best Strategies. She shed those clients Tuesday, but in her new job will be able to make decisions that have profound effects on how they operate and their bottom lines.

Where are the vaccines?

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. It’s not often that I find myself on the same side as the editorial board for the Madison paper. Here’s s snippet:

After Governor Tony Evers failed the unemployed of Wisconsin with his inept management of unemployment claims, he is compounding Wisconsin’s misery with his failure to administer the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine. What is more infuriating is that when questioned about it, Evers blusters and obfuscates with all the indignation of a career bureaucrat unacquainted with accountability.

 

[…]

 

Last week, Governor Evers admitted that his administration would be unable to begin inoculating the general public until June – over five months from now. It is a disgraceful admission of failure given with the banality of an indifferent government bureaucrat.

 

[…]

 

This subcommittee still needs to finalize Phase 1B before moving on to Phase 1C, Phase 2, etc. These are decisions that could be made in an afternoon. While Wisconsinites are suffering and being told that there is a medical crisis, Evers’ bureaucracy moves at its own pace – oblivious to the travails of the citizens it serves.

 

[…]

 

When confronted for his administration’s failures, Evers blames the federal government for not giving the state enough doses (despite having administered less than half of the doses available); blames Republicans; makes vigorous, if unsubstantiated, proclamations about the competence of his government; and refuses to accept any responsibility for his administration’s failures. However, despite his accusations and deflections, the simple truth is that Evers has failed to administer the doses Wisconsin has already been given.

 

Evers’ administration of the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine has been too slow, too bureaucratic, and too lazy. While Wisconsinites are being asked to forgo their livelihoods, upend their lives, and accept a retardation of civil rights in response to a pandemic, Governor Evers and his administration are behaving like it is just a another day at the office.

 

Evers Calls Special Session to Fix Unemployment System

And the legislature rightfully balks.

The Democratic governor announced the effort to upgrade the system during his State of the State speech on Tuesday. He introduced a bill Wednesday that calls for the state Department of Workforce Development to conduct all transactions electronically and hands the agency $5.3 million to renovate and modernize the claims system. He also issued an executive order calling for lawmakers to take up the bill in a special session beginning at noon on Tuesday.

But Republican leaders of the Senate and Assembly accused Evers of trying to shift blame. Assembly Speaker Robin Vos said Evers’ plan, which appears dead on arrival, is about politics, not policy.

“Governor Evers already has the funding and tools he needs to fix the problems,” said Republican Senate Majority Leader Devin LeMahieu. “Now, instead of effectively using his resources, he’s scrambling to shift blame while people are still left waiting.”

The Republicans are right. Do you know what the tell is? How do you know that Evers is politicizing this instead of acting in good faith?

He called a special session. That’s the tell. The legislature is actually in session and could take up his proposals as part of their regular business. There isn’t any need for a special session. Yet Evers calls a special session because it gives him the cover to claim that he is “doing something” while the Republicans are “failing to act.” It is an attempt to shift blame.

It is also worth noting that we are TEN months removed from when this became an issue and Evers is just now getting around to thinking that he needs the legislature to do something? Is that the speed of government? (yes, it is)

Archives

Categories

Pin It on Pinterest