Tag Archives: Around the Bend

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Poll: Should West Bend School District list true cost of referendum on November ballot?

The West Bend School Board (WBSB) met Monday night, Aug. 13. As of Friday, Aug. 17 the minutes from the WBSB Monday, Aug. 13 meeting had not been posted on the District website.

Cobbling together some of the details from the board agenda there appears to be a draft of a referendum question for the Nov. 6, 2018 Fall Election ballot.

According to the draft, the WB School District appears to be proposing a $50 million referendum for construction of a new Jackson Elementary School and capital improvements at the West Bend High School.

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The proposal for a 2-story Jackson Elementary follows on the heels of a report issued by the WBSD regarding a trend of declining enrollment.

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In a 6-page report from Baird the preliminary total interest on the referendum would be $35,176,350 for a total cost to taxpayers of more than $85 million.

Also note the West Bend School District is currently paying off about $130 million over the next 20 years in current referendum debt.

The poll question deals with a policy passed in January 2012 regarding fiscal management. The policy below hones in on key terms like “genuine transparency regarding the planned use of public funds” and  “a much more fully informed electorate” and “builds trust among all District stakeholders.”

The question is: Should the board move forward on a referendum, would you as a taxpayer like to see the total cost and interest listed on the ballot question ( $85,176,350) or would you prefer to see only the referendum amount ($50,000,000) as listed in the draft above?

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West Bend School Board member Chris Zwygert, speaking as a person, indicated the board would be meeting again Monday, Aug. 20 at 6 p.m. to discuss whether to move forward with the referendum.

Zwygert also indicated if the board decides to go forward with the referendum there is a time limitation when the board needs to declare a referendum and its language to get it to the municipal clerk. “My understanding is if we do that on our next board meeting, which is the last Monday in August (Aug. 27) that gives us one day to get that information to the municipal clerk,” he said.

Ribbon cutting at Born Learning Trail in Slinger

It was a perfect day for a ribbon cutting this week for the new Born Learning Trail at Brendan’s Playground in Slinger.

The event featured a who’s who of local educators and business leaders including Slinger School Superintendent Daren Sievers, Pete Rettler from Moraine Park Technical College, the United Way of Washington County was in the house and so was trail sponsor Legendary Whitetails.

This is the fourth Born Learning Trail in Washington County. It’s designed to help with early-childhood development.

Some of the learning segments feature hopscotch, colored circles, letters from the alphabet and there’s classic Legendary-Whitetails flair to the trail with animal footprints from deer, birds and raccoons.

“It’s nice to get the kids away from the screen time and be with their families; be active and the trail helps brain development,” said mom Theresa Huffman.

Amish working on luxury apartment building in West Bend

We’ll it’s not every day you see Amish contractors building a luxury apartment complex in West Bend. Neighbors have noticed the straw hats, suspenders, gray shirts, beards and the charm and courtesy of the crew at 128 Wisconsin Street.

Steven is one of six Amish carpenters who hail from Kingston, WI. located in Green Lake County.

“I’m sure people have been looking at us but I don’t look around too much when I’m working,” Steven said.

Steven, 32, is part of New Home Builders in Kingston. He worked in the Washington County area before, building a home on Highway 144 on the western edge of the county.

From a cultural perspective Amish have generally been known to abstain from electricity.  An article in Amish America entitled “Do Amish Use Electricity?” was written about Amish living off the power grid and how it “helps to prevent the influence of radio, television and the internet that may offer temptations that contradict the core Christian values of the Amish community.”

On the job site however, it’s evident the Amish are using power tools. “If somebody furnishes the power tools we use them but we also take our own tools from job to job,” Steven said.

Culturally the Amish also don’t like having their photo taken, so permission was requested.  “I’m not going to pose for you… but it’s OK if you take my photo,” said Steven.

There will be 10 market-rate apartments starting at $1,475 a month. The luxury apartments with stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, granite countertops, private balcony/patio, pet friendly, heated underground parking with storage; some will have views of the Eisenbahn trail.

The occupancy should occur in December.

West Bend Town Board tables action on closing boat ramps

A full house during Monday night’s Town of West Bend Board meeting.

There were a couple of hot-topics on the agenda. Town Chairman Jim Heipp asked to table action on the closing of boat ramps in the town. “We’ll put it on hold until further notice,” said Heipp.

Citing a lack of communication from the Department of Natural Resources and attorneys regarding public access Heipp called to table the action.

Heipp cited a couple statues from the DNR regarding public access and said he received a notice from the board’s attorney that the statutes weren’t clear to them either.

“We’re going to put our decision on closing the ramps on hold until we get further information from the DNR,” he said.

Town Supervisor Jeff Geib seconded the motion. Supervisor Frank Carr was the only dissenting vote.

“My reading of that DNR requirement has to do with permanent closings and not temporary closings,” said Carr. ”It seems quite clear to me in the regulation that is a permanent closing and not a temporary closing. So that’s why I’m voting against the tabling because I don’t believe it applies in this set of circumstances.”

Heipp said he wants to have further discussion and more facts before making a decision.

Other highlights from the meeting:

–Rental properties on Big Cedar Lake: Town of WB is zoned R-1 residential. Town will have to look at businesses being run and renting out their docks. Heipp said this was a zoning ordinance and a violation of town code. “We’re going to have to figure out how to enforce that because you people have way, way too many boats on that lake,” said Heipp. “And the boats aren’t people who are lake residents or people who are just coming in on Saturday and Sunday.”

-Fleet Farm access on County Hwy Z: Fleet Farm laid out designs with the West Bend Plan Commission last week regarding its new 190,000-square-foot store on Highway 33 and County Hwy Z. During the pitch to the city Fleet officials said they would only have access roads off Highway 33. During Monday night’s Town Board meeting Heipp said the city, state, and county are satisfied with that plan however the DOT wants an access road off County Hwy Z. That plan is still in discussion.

Gold Seal of Approval for Alliance Services, Inc. in West Bend

Alliance Services, Inc. has earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Health Care Staffing Services Certification. The certification demonstrates Alliance Services’ commitment to providing qualified and competent health care professionals.

Alliance Services, Inc. underwent a rigorous onsite review on Friday, July 27, 2018. Joint Commission experts evaluated compliance with national standards that assess how health care staffing firms determine the qualifications and competency of staff, placement of staff, and how they monitor performance. All certified health care staffing organizations are required to collect data on their own performance.

“Alliance Services, Inc. has demonstrated its commitment to providing quality health care staffing services to health care organizations as evidenced by its achievement of Joint Commission certification,” said Patrick Phelan, executive director, Hospital Business Development, The Joint Commission. “We recognize and commend Alliance Services, Inc. for its efforts to provide a safe, high-quality standard of service.”

“Alliance Services, Inc. is pleased to receive certification from The Joint Commission, the premier quality improvement and accrediting body in the nation,” added Georgianna “Gigi” Dee, President, CEO and Director of Nursing.

“Health Care Staffing Certification demonstrates our commitment and accountability to clients and the health care professionals we employ. Certification establishes, defines and measures delivery on key functional areas and performance measures across the entire industry.”

2018 Board of Review is Aug. 28, 2018

The City of West Bend sent all property owners a 2018 property assessment. The 2018 Board of Review will be held on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 at 10 a.m. in City Hall.

Keep in mind the city did explore an advisory referendum with a wheel tax or a property tax increase or asking Washington County for a share of its sales tax. A final decision is still pending to determine how to pay for more road improvements in the City of West Bend.

There’s also a possible Nov. 6 referendum for the West Bend School District. A decision to move forward with a $50 million referendum with $35+ million in taxes and interest for a total of $85+ million is being discussed Monday, Aug. 20. Remember this debt would be placed on top of the $130 million the district still has with current referendum debt.

So that total would be brought to more than $210 million in outstanding referendum debt for the school district alone. Finally, remember your property tax bill is made up of taxes to be paid to the city, county, school district, Moraine Park Technical College and the state. The last city-wide revaluation was 2011.

Updates & tidbits

This Sunday, August 19, Rev. Nathan Reesman will lead a Holy Hour from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Saint Frances Cabrini Parish, 1025 S. Seventh Avenue, West Bend, to pray for the purification of the Church’s clergy and ministers, and to pray in reparation for the sins against chastity and the abuse of power that have been committed against our people. Please join us in prayer.

– On Sunday, August 19, the Allenton Parade will be dedicated to the only remaining ladies who are charter members of the American Legion Unit 483.Audrey Rosbeck and Mary Jane Sternat will be honored for their years of contributions to the Auxiliary and the greater Allenton Area.

A note of congratulations to Ryan Vossekuil who was sworn in this week as the Village of Jackson’s new Chief of Police. Vossekuil previously served 19 years with the Mayville Police Department, working his way up the ranks from police explorer to police chief. Chief Vossekuil has been busy the last couple weeks getting to know the village and the people who work and live here. Stay tuned – Jackson PD will be handing out Green Bay Packer trading cards this year.

The annual St. Frances Cabrini Used Book Sale and Rummage Sale is Saturday, Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 9 from 8:30 a.m. – noon in Mother Cabrini Hall in the lower level of church. Used book donations will be accepted from now through Sept. 7.

The annual Allenton Picnic is this weekend, August 17, 18, and 19. There’s lots of family activities including games and rides, music and food and don’t forget Sunday’s parade.

– The West Bend High School Class of 1948 will hold its 70th class reunion August 18, 2018 at New Perspective, 2013 Continental Drive in West Bend from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

– Marty Schulteis as the next Washington County Sheriff. The Captain beat Lt. Jason Guslick during Tuesday’s election. Guslick issued congratulations to Schulteis. “I want to thank everyone who voted for me and those who helped in my campaign,” said Guslick. “I want to personally congratulate Marty Schulteis on his victory and I look forward to working with Sheriff Schulteis in the future and to continue to serve the citizens of Washington County.”

Schulteis will take the oath of office in January 2019 as Washington County Sheriff Dale Schmidt steps into retirement.

In February this year Schmidt announced he would not seek another term in office. His current term ends Jan. 4, 2019. In neighboring Dodge County incumbent Sheriff Dale Schmidt beat Jim Ketchem.

-St. Frances Cabrini annual Rummage Sale is Thursday, Sept. 20 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 21 from 8 a.m. to noon in Mother Cabrini Hall in the lower level of the church. Baked goods will also be available. Rummage items can be dropped off Sept. 15 through Sept. 19.

-If you were a fan of the Galactic McDonald’s, 1140 S. Main Street in West Bend, you may want to pay a last visit as changes are ahead. The golden arches will undergo a large remodel which includes removing the galactic theme and the play area and a new playland with interactive technology will be put in its place. McDonald’s is going with a more modern, contemporary theme. The changes take place this month with a goal is to remain open during construction. On a history note: The Galactic McDonald’s first opened Feb. 28, 1996. “I was there when the special sauce for the Big Mac was mixed at the store and when the Hamburgler crawl thing, bouncy fry girls and metal slides were in the outdoor play land,” Sharon Ruplinger said recalling how they had to shut down the play area when it was “real hot because kids would burn their legs.”

– There’s a golf outing Sept. 23 at West Bend Lakes Golf Club and proceeds will go to the Luke Gromowski Ironman Scholarship Fund. Luke Gromowski was a senior at West Bend East when he died in a car accident in November 2014. A $1,000 scholarship will be presented each year to a senior from West Bend East and West High School that participated in football from fifth grade through their senior year. Registration for the outing is 8 a.m. with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $100 per adult and $50 for a student. Contact Ed Ihlenfeld at 262-707-5449 for more detail.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

Sign up today for the 8th Annual Swinging for Seniors Golf Outing at West Bend Lakes Golf Club. All proceeds benefit Senior Citizens Activities, Inc. Stick around after golf and take part in the Classics for a Cause Raffle and a chance to win a 1968 Ford Mustang.

Tornado siren malfunctions at Washington County Fair Park

We had sunny skies and pleasant temps last Sunday and the tornado siren was blaring for nearly an hour at the Washington County Fair Park. It wasn’t a weather emergency and the Russians weren’t coming, according to the Washington County Sheriff’s Department it was just a malfunction

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Is Kewaskum Classic Car Show in jeopardy?

One of the most popular car shows in Washington County may be in jeopardy.

Mark ‘Kurly’ Kissinger posted a note on social media over the weekend that he was “taking a break from this year’s Kewaskum Classic Car Show.”

The annual Grand Larsony Custom Classic Car Show started in 2000 and was organized by Grand Larsony owner Richard ‘Kissey’ Kissinger.

In 2015 ‘Kissey’ announced he was stepping down from the event.

The show, a popular stop for the car clubs, normally drew about 400 classic cars to Main Street in Kewaskum. Over the years Kissey used the car show as a way raise money to benefit local people in need.

In 2016 Mark ‘Kurly’ Kissinger of Jackson said he would be taking over.  “My father and I ran a car show in Slinger for a number of years,” said Kissinger.  “I’ve gone to Kissey’s show and I don’t plan on changing anything.”

Kurly Kissinger is Kissey’s godson. Kissinger’s father Mark is Kissey’s cousin.

This would have been the 18th annual show.

Early word is Kissey is looking to step back in. The show is normally the third Sunday in September; this year it would be Sept. 16. The Kewaskum Fire Department normally serves beer at the event and already holds a permit.

West Bend teen’s Eagle Scout project benefits Washington County Humane Society

Bailey Marshall, 16, of West Bend has been involved in Boy Scouts since fifth grade. He belongs to Troop 765 in Jackson. Marshall currently has a Life rank and is working on his Eagle Scout Badge. For the past month Marshall has been building tables, chairs and benches for the Washington County Humane Society’s new courtyard.

Importance of Scouts: It really helps me build my character and with public speaking. It’s teaching me how to be a man. Right now I’m working on a communication badge and in my troop I’ve made a lot of special bonds with people and they’ve been encouraging me to keep moving forward.

Washington County Humane Society is a great local organization: I’ve had pets from the Humane Society and when I found out they were building a new courtyard I went to talk to Volunteer Coordinator Jessica Jacklin and she wanted me to help with building tables, benches and chairs. I was totally onboard.

Details behind Eagle Scout project: I found designs for the 3 tables, 3 benches and 6 chairs online. I solicited donations from people in the community; both items and money and then I set a date to put it together. No one showed up but we got it done anyway with the help of my mom, dad, and step dad. We have a couple more chairs to build; it was rough but I loved doing it. The project will help me toward my Eagle Scout Badge and I’m really happy with the way it turned out. I hope the Humane Society likes it too.

Marshall completed the project and with fellow scouts and volunteers delivered the set to the Washington County Human Society on Highway 60.

On a side note: Marshall loves math and has his sights set on getting into the auto industry. He said he loves working with tools and hopes to be a mechanic. During his down time Marshall can be found on his scooter and doing flips on his backyard trampoline.

West Bend Plan Commission reviews concept plan for Fleet Farm

The West Bend Plan Commission spent time Tuesday evening looking over the proposed concept plan for a new 190,000-square-foot Fleet Farm to be located on the southeast corner of Highway 33 and County Highway Z.

The gas station and retail store would include a 5,000-square-foot convenience store along with a 5,000-square-foot convenience store and outdoor garden center.

Commission member Sara Fleischman asked how customers would get to the two retail lots being planned for future development.

City planner Jim Reinke said the commercial outlets would be accessed off the private drive that runs east west.  “They will be entering off the main drive into the parking lot,” he said.

Commission member Jed Dolnick praised the design of the building but asked what type of signage the retailer would have since the building is set back a distance from State Highway 33.

“Are they going to handle signage needs with monument signs off Washington Street or will the signs be really high up,” asked Dolnick.

Reinke said that hadn’t come up yet but more than likely there will be signs on the building.

West Bend Director of Development Mark Piotrowicz spoke a bit about the surrounding wetlands and some kames to the west and east of the proposed development. He said previous plans looked at access off CTY Z but this proposal blocks that area off.

“There’s a bigger buffer now from the wetlands,” he said.

Mayor Kraig Sadownikow said a traffic study is currently underway and those details will determine possible signals or a controlled intersection taking into account Highway Z and Shepherds Drive.

Fleet Farm is still working with the DOT on access permits off the state highway.

“We’re very excited about what we’re presenting and the materials we’re using and we believe it will be a great improvement to what we have in the existing market and we’re very excited to get this store open,” said Tom Carrico with Fleet Farm.

As far as what will become of the current Fleet Farm on Hwy 33 and 18th Avenue, Carrico said the company is already well into exploring a sale of the property.

“It’s in our best interest to sell that as well,” said Carrico. “We are very excited to get a new store going in West Bend.”

Mayor Sadownikow made sure if the sale of the site on Hwy 33 and 18th Avenue were to take a while, he wanted to make sure the building would not fall into further disrepair.

There are several more steps that have to be taken before construction can officially get underway including zoning requirements, land division, two conditional use permits, and a public hearing is still needed for an amendment to the 2020 Comprehensive Plan for the City of West Bend from commercial, open space and two-family residential to commercial and open space land use for lands located on the southeast corner of CTH Z and W. Washington Street.

King Buffet closes in West Bend

The owner of the strip mall on W. Washington Street confirmed this week King Buffet has officially closed. The storefront, 1431 W. Washington St., is listed for rent.

King Buffet was known for its reasonable price (under $10), peanut chicken, and friendly staff that helped with soda refills.

On a history note: Do you remember the other businesses that used to be in that strip mall. I recall there used to be a Boot Corral in one of the shops and Video Plus was on the end cap for year. It’s where the new West Bend Sausage Plus is anticipated to open.

Some input has included Karen’s Energy, Cash and Carry, and Pruett’s Floor Covering.

Nice donation to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County

A nice donation was made this week to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County.

Each summer Steve Taylor organizes a Vintage Motorcycle Poker Run. This year 68 people participated in the event and raised $2,000. On Friday a check was presented to the organizations Executive Director Jaymee Harvey Willms.

Over the past seven years $14,000 has been donated to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County.

“Steve has asked that the money go to our annual recognition dinner,” said Harvey Willms. “In our 50th year we’d like to potentially invite some of our past members to the celebration. For a nonprofit to last 50 years in the community really says something about our organization.”

Some of the sponsors for the Poker Run include: Lutz Chiropractic, C&C Business Management, Newburg State Bank, Arby’s Restaurant, Eddie’s Lakehouse, Creative Cut, Midwest Table Repair, Nicole Seering, Chrissy Taylor, Dave Mapes, Curly & Lois Kohlwey, Gary Mapes, Butch Straveler, Steve Taylor, Terri Megonigle, Leslie Bassett, Jeff Mapes, Carol McKee, and Dean Herriges.

West Bend H.S. Class of 1948 class reunion

The West Bend High School Class of 1948 will hold its 70th class reunion August 18, 2018. The reunion will be held at New Perspective (formerly The Lighthouse), 2013 Continental Drive in West Bend from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.  A brunch will be served and the cost is $20 per person. Call Pat at 262-438-5938 or Dick at 262-438-5951 for reservations and further information.

2018 Board of Review is Aug. 28, 2018

The City of West Bend sent all property owners a 2018 property assessment. The 2018 Board of Review will be held on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 at 10 a.m. in City Hall.

Keep in mind the city did explore an advisory referendum with a wheel tax or a property tax increase or asking Washington County for a share of its sales tax. A final decision is still pending to determine how to pay for more road improvements in the City of West Bend.

There’s also the possible November referendum for the West Bend School District. A decision will likely be made to move forward with the referendum in the next few weeks. The early number being thrown about is a $50 million referendum however that’s without taxes and interest and it would be placed on top of the $130 million the district still has with current referendum debt.

So that total would be brought to more than $180 million in outstanding referendum debt for the school district alone. A representative from Baird is supposed to give an update in a couple of weeks.

Finally, remember your property tax bill is made up of taxes to be paid to the city, county, school district, Moraine Park Technical College and the state. The last city-wide revaluation was 2011.

The Audubon Inn in Mayville is for sale

Step inside the magnificent Audubon Inn, in Mayville WI and you’ll be staying at the same boutique hotel as Paul Newman and Tom Cruise. Built in 1896 this unique hotel on the National Registry of Historic Places showcases historic charm with modern amenities. Guests will enjoy boutique shopping, museums and internationally renowned Horicon Marsh.

Onsite restaurant NOLA North Grille’s bar and dining rooms feature impeccable woodwork, tile, and stained glass, creating unforgettable ambience, 18 cozy guest rooms located on the 2nd and 3rd floors offer double Jacuzzi tubs and high ceilings.

Savanna Rose raises money for Children’s Hospital

The grand total is in and a very happy Savanna Rose is proud to report $748 was raised during Saturday’s Downtown West Bend Farmers’ Market as she held her 4th annual Teddy Bear Drive.

The event benefits Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and St. Joseph’s Hospital.

Rose has done some fantastic work the past few years. “In 2015 we raised $450. In 2016 we raised $900 and last year we raised a whopping $1,500,” she said.

“Money is used to purchase over 570 Teddy bears along with art supplies for children in the hospital. This could not be possible without your love and support!”

Rose said the reason she does this is simple. “I’ve always loved children and have wanted the best for them. I have a personal interest in the field of medicine. The Teddy Bear Drive allows me to combine my passions for music, helping kids, volunteering, and the medical field all into one,” she said. ”When a child comes to the hospital it can be a very scary moment. Unfamiliar people, machines, and environment. Sometimes a stuffed animal can comfort children in times of stress and chaos.” Over the past four years Savanna Rose has raised $3,747 during the Teddy Bear Drive.

Updates & tidbits

Election Day is Tuesday, Aug. 14.  Polls are open 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

The sixth key was the charm as McDonald’s in West Bend teamed with Russ Darrow to give away a 2-year lease on a new Jeep Wrangler during an event at the Highway 33 restaurant to benefit the Boys & Girls Club of Washington County. Ten people qualified to have a shot at starting the vehicle. Steven Arneson, 26, of West Bend was the sixth person to climb behind the wheel and push the button and the Jeep roared to life along with the crowd. “I was telling everyone at work that I was going to be the winner,” said Arneson.

The annual St. Frances Cabrini Used Book Sale and Rummage Sale is Saturday, Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 9 from 8:30 a.m. – noon in Mother Cabrini Hall in the lower level of church. Used book donations will be accepted from now through Sept. 7 at noon in the lower level of the church, at the south side door.

The annual Allenton Picnic is next weekend, August 17, 18, and 19. There’s lots of family activities including games and rides, music and food and don’t forget Sunday’s parade.

-St. Frances Cabrini annual Rummage sale is Thursday, Sept. 20 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 21 from 8 a.m. to noon in Mother Cabrini Hall in the lower level of the church. Baked goods will also be available. Rummage items can be dropped off Sept. 15 through Sept. 19. No TVs or big furniture.

– There’s a golf outing Sept. 23 at West Bend Lakes Golf Club and proceeds will go to the Luke Gromowski Ironman Scholarship Fund. Luke Gromowski was a senior at West Bend East when he died in a car accident in November 2014. A $1,000 scholarship will be presented each year to a senior from West Bend East and West High School that participated in football from fifth grade through their senior year. Registration for the outing is 8 a.m. with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $100 per adult and $50 for a student. Contact Ed Ihlenfeld at 262-707-5449 for more detail.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

– A hat tip to local shop owner and former West Bend alderman Terry Vrana for the hard work he put in to restored the Build, Boost & Buy in Barton wall mural. Vrana has spent the last year upgrading the facade of the old fire hall on the corner of N. Main Street and Highway 144.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

Sign up today for the 8th Annual Swinging for Seniors Golf Outing at West Bend Lakes Golf Club. All proceeds benefit Senior Citizens Activities, Inc. Stick around after golf and take part in the Classics for a Cause Raffle and a chance to win a 1968 Ford Mustang.

-There will be a Memorial for John Geib on Friday, Aug. 17, 2018 from 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.  at the West Bend VFW Hall, 260 Sand Drive, in West Bend. Military Honors are scheduled for 5 p.m. Bring pictures and/or memories to share. John E. Geib, age 70, of Mansfield, MO, formerly of West Bend, passed away on June 23, 2018.

Special blessing for Little Saints Early Learning Center at St. Frances Cabrini

A special blessing took place Sunday morning at the new Little Saints Early Learning Center at St. Frances Cabrini Parish. The former convent, 615 W. Hawthorn Drive, will now be home to the new care center for children ages 6 weeks to 3 years old.

“As we celebrate another use for this building made for our Notre Dame Sisters who taught here, it is now a place for our youngest people to come,” said Rev. Nathan Reesman.

Aside from blessing the facility Rev. Reesman also blessed the new principal at St. Frances Cabrini William Waech, facilities director Missy Dieterich, and the rest of the staff.

“This is great for the parish and the community,” said Waech.  “It just offers families that are working full time a place they can trust for their children.”

Rev. Reesman said the child care center had been in the vision of the parish for quite a while; however they didn’t have the space until now.

“After the Notre Dame Sisters moved out of the convent the space was used as a Youth Formation Center,” Reesman said. “The timing was just opportune and the space became available and last fall we were given a generous donation to do something like this.”

Dieterich said the remodel at the convent included morphing the chapel into an infant and toddler room. “We pulled up the carpet and repainted it and moved the sacristy cabinet was moved to another room and repurposed as storage for the teachers,” she said.

Furniture and toys have been donated.

Dieterich said they can accept 36 children. Current enrollment is 29 with room for more.

St. Frances Cabrini will not count the Little Saints Learning Center into its school enrollment.

The K3 – 8th grade enrollment at St. Frances Cabrini School for the coming year is 255 students.

 

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

West Bend Plan Commission to review site plan for new Fleet Farm

The long-awaited news of a new Fleet Farm being built in West Bend finally appears to be moving forward.

According to Mayor Kraig Sadownikow a concept plan for a new Fleet Farm will be discussed at the Aug. 7 Plan Commission meeting.

“This is going to be a full blown new store that’s about 190,000 square feet,” said Sadownikow. “This will be similar to the size of Meijer, a free-standing store and it’ll be great for that side of town.”

There are a couple of specific nuances about the property, according to Sadownikow, that need to be ironed out with the DNR and the Town of West Bend.

“In the past there was some residential shown on that property but that has since been eliminated and instead it’s woods and wetland,” he said.

City officials have confirmed they’ve had a “great open dialogue with Fleet Farm over the past several months.”

“Fleet Farm actually wants to see this fast tracked,” said Sadownikow. “I’m really proud of our administration and the current council who is open to continuing what was started in the past.”

The long-rumor activity of a new Fleet Farm in West Bend dates to 2004 when Fleet Farm announced it was going to build ‘the largest store in the state’ on a 30-acre parcel along Highway 33 and County Highway Z.

The Mills brothers also acquired 40 adjacent acres and plans were on track for a 274,000-square-foot store.

In January 2016, the Mills family sold its business to New York-based investment firm KKR.

In the first quarter of the year, KKR met with store managers. This is the message passed along, “We anticipate investing significantly in the business adding infrastructure, stores and local jobs,” said Nate Taylor, then with the retail portion of KKR.

Over the next 13 years, nothing was built.

Some businesses along Highway 33 west have claimed there’s been activity on some of the land owned by Fleet Farm. Representatives of Fleet Farm have met with the City of West Bend to share plans for a proposed 190,000-square-foot store, in addition to a 5,000-square-foot convenience store and outdoor garden center.

The current Fleet Farm is located just east of Hwy 45 on West Washington Street; Fleet Farm is proposing the new development to be west of Hwy 45, on land they own on the southeast corner of Hwy 33 and County Road Z.

“I am proud to support the growth of Fleet Farm in the City of West Bend, as is our city council and staff,” said City of West Bend Mayor Kraig Sadownikow.

“We pride ourselves on fostering business growth, as well as being a business-friendly community. We have created a positive climate in the City of West Bend that encourages Fleet Farm to not only continue to do business here, but increase their operations to serve our great citizens and the surrounding region.”

Fleet Farm has served the upper Midwest since 1955, and they have been part of the West Bend community since 1961.

An early look at the plan includes a 190,000-square-foot store makes space for a gas station, a 5,000-square-foot convenience store, quite a bit of parking and what appears to be enough area to meet wetland demands for the DNR.

Just to the east of the proposed Fleet Farm will be the 39-acre parcel that’s soon to be Morrie’s West Bend Honda Subaru. Morrie’s has cleared the Plan Commission and at last word is expected to break ground on the west side of Highway 33 and Scenic Drive in September.

With all the development to the west on Highway 33 what would you like to see go in to the old Fleet Farm location at Hwy 33 and 18th Avenue. That’s a diamond corner with McDonald’s, Walgreen, Sendik’s, and Starbucks.

Property assessments on the rise in West Bend

The City of West Bend sent all property owners in the community a gift. It’s a 2018 property assessment. My assessment went up $14,100.

According to the City website: The average increase in value is approximately 12%.  Certain areas of the city may experience more or less than the average increase in value.  An increase in assessment does not by itself mean a tax increase.

Open Book will begin Monday, July 30, 2018 through Monday, August 20, 2018.  Office hours are from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. The 2018 Board of Review will be held on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 at 10 a.m. in City Hall.

Keep in mind the city did explore an advisory referendum with a wheel tax or a property tax increase or asking Washington County for a share of its sales tax. A final decision is still pending to determine how to pay for more road improvements in the City of West Bend.

There’s also the possible November referendum for the West Bend School District. A decision will likely be made to move forward with the referendum in the next few weeks. The early number being thrown about is a $50 million referendum however that’s without taxes and interest and it would be placed on top of the $130 million the district still has with current referendum debt.

So that total would be brought to more than $180 million in outstanding referendum debt for the school district alone. A representative from Baird is supposed to give an update in a couple of weeks.

Finally, remember your property tax bill is made up of taxes to be paid to the city, county, school district, Moraine Park Technical College and the state.

It appears the last city-wide revaluation was in 2010.

Wrapping up the season for Carl Kuss Field in West Bend           By Craig Larsen

There will be a final celebration at Carl M. Kuss Field at Regner Park on August 7 as a groundbreaking will be held to kickoff a renovation of the baseball stadium.

The project includes a new grandstand, restrooms, concessions and the addition of a turf field, new lighting and dugouts.

Funding for the project was initiated by a $500,000 matching grant from the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation. The matching grant is coming from the public and private sector in West Bend including the West Bend Baseball Association.

There was also word this week that the Milwaukee Bucks have partnered with West Bend Mutual Charitable Foundation to gift $150,000 to benefit the people of Washington County.

The organizations are coming together with the City of West Bend to make a lasting local impact, with the development of a new multi-sport court in West Bend’s Regner Park.

The sport court, which will feature basketball courts and volleyball courts, will be available for use by the city’s recreation department and the public.

Final sendoff

According to Craig Larsen with the WBBA on Tuesday, August 7, 2018, the final game will be played at Carl M. Kuss Field, as West Bend 7 Up will be taking on the West Allis Nighthawks at 7 p.m.

The public is encouraged to come down to Carl Kuss from 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., walk around the complex one last time, take pictures, share memories, and maybe play a game of catch in the outfield grass.

This will be your last chance as demolition will begin the following day, Wednesday, August 8.

Successful COLUMNS 5K

A super evening for a 5K and COLUMNS along with Horicon Bank managed to pull off another great event. Runners and walkers took off in a flash at 6 p.m. and raced through Riverside Park.

Alec Miller, 22, of West Bend crossed the finish line in a time of 16 minutes and 6 seconds. It was his sixth consecutive first-place finish at the COLUMNS 5K. “I’m not in the greatest shape right now so I’ll take 16:06; last year I was in much better shape,” Miller said.

Brianna Renner, 18, of West Bend also picked up her second consecutive win. She finished in 20:28.

Upgrade in store for Full Service Car Wash in West Bend

Changes at the local car wash in West Bend sure do make people nervous. Tyler Leikam, vice president of Full Service Car Wash, 2404 W Washington St., in West Bend said neighbors shouldn’t worry as FSCW is just getting a facelift and some new amenities to make service better for the community.

There building is getting a splash of new paint; there will be new signage and also access to free vacuums on the south side of the building.  The vacuums should be installed in late October.

Leikam said the prices have basically remained the same however they’ve added the tax into the price. “We relocated our point of sale to the entrance of the car wash so people don’t have to go inside,” he said. “We’ve rounded the prices up to the nearest dollar and that price includes the tax.”

Kettle Moraine YMCA with generous donation to biking community

The Kettle Moraine YMCA has graciously purchased 11 of the 12 racks produced by Moraine Park Technical College. The Kettle Moraine YMCA is donating six Washington County logo’d racks to the county for placement in county parks, potentially including along the Eisenbahn State Trail. Where would you recommend the racks be placed?

The Audubon Inn in Mayville is for sale

Step inside the magnificent Audubon Inn, in Mayville WI and you’ll be staying at the same boutique hotel as Paul Newman and Tom Cruise. Built in 1896 this unique hotel on the National Registry of Historic Places showcases historic charm with modern amenities. Guests will enjoy boutique shopping, museums and internationally renowned Horicon Marsh.

Onsite restaurant NOLA North Grille’s bar and dining rooms feature impeccable woodwork, tile, and stained glass, creating unforgettable ambience, 18 cozy guest rooms located on the 2nd and 3rd floors offer double Jacuzzi tubs and high ceilings.

Thanks for supporting the Washington County Fair                  By Kellie Boone

The 160th annual Washington County Fair has come to a close and preparations for 2019 have already begun.  We were very fortunate to have fantastic weather and great people that came out and enjoyed all that the Fair has to offer.

I wanted to take a moment to express my sincere appreciation for all the people that make the Fair happen; it really does take a village!

There are numerous groups that contribute to successfully operating the Fair, some of which include: the Fair Park Staff, Board and Committees, the Superintendents, the Military Committee, ticketing staff, volunteer groups that are our grounds crew, car parkers and servers in the beverage tents.  There are also the runners, the main stage help, livestock drivers, exhibitors, judges, vendors and even some that just show up every year to do whatever they can do to help.  I’m sure I’m forgetting a few and I apologize if I did.

I’d also like to thank our many sponsors who help make the Fair a reality every year; we appreciate your support and couldn’t do it without you!

Last but not least, the Fair goers; one of the highlights of running the Fair is watching all the fun had and memories made by family and friends.  Thank you for including the Fair in your summer plans. We hope to see you all in 2019!    Sincerely Kellie Boone

Updates & tidbits

Students who made the Scholastic Honor Roll during the spring term 2018 at Oregon State University included Nathan M. Burns a freshman from West Bend. Burns scored a 3.5 or better during the 2018 spring term. He is studying University Exploratory Studies.

– Newly paved Eighth Avenue in West Bend is now open to traffic.  Give it a go before all the dudes on skateboards find it and take over the blacktop. The project cost a bit over $700,000 and included everything from upgrading storm sewers to new curb and gutter to driveways and sidewalk repair. The newly paved road runs north from Chestnut to Walnut Street.

City Administrator Jay Shambeau said the work on 18th Avenue is also near completion and neighbors should also take note of the upcoming closure of Schmidt Road from East Washington Street/STH 33 to Creek Road. Rolfs Avenue will replace Schmidt Road as the connection between Creek Road and Washington Street.

– Cedar Community hired Julie Gabelmann as its first Vice President of Resident Experience.

The new Kwik Trip gas station / convenience store, 806 S. Main Street, opened August 2. This is the second Kwik Trip in West Bend. The first opened Oct. 27, 2016 at 1750 S. Silverbrook Drive. The ribbon cutting for the new store is Wednesday, Aug. 8.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

Sign up today for the 8th Annual Swinging for Seniors Golf Outing at West Bend Lakes Golf Club. All proceeds benefit Senior Citizens Activities, Inc. Stick around after golf and take part in the Classics for a Cause Raffle and a chance to win a 1968 Ford Mustang.

Memorial is August 17 for John Geib

There will be a Memorial for John Geib on Friday, Aug. 17, 2018 from 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.  at the West Bend VFW Hall, 260 Sand Drive, in West Bend. Military Honors are scheduled for 5 p.m. Bring pictures and/or memories to share.

John E. Geib, age 70, of Mansfield, MO, formerly of West Bend, passed away on June 23, 2018.

John was born on April 10, 1948 in West Bend to Sarto and Ernestine (Immel) Geib. John grew up in Barton attending St. Mary’s School and West Bend High School. The next step would forever change his life. He, along with his friend Mike Hoeft, registered for the draft in the Army on May 17, 1967.

John was promoted to Sergeant (E5) on graduation from the non-commissioned officer academy at Fort Benning, GA where he took training as a combat leader.

John received a medical discharge for wounds suffered during conflict. He valorously attempted to save one of his men who had become pinned down by enemy ambush and had been mortally wounded.  Despite being wounded himself, John attempted several times to brave the intense hostile fire to recover the soldier until he was ordered to withdraw. John’s actions earned him the Bronze Star Medal of Valor for heroism. Additionally, he also received the Vietnam campaign medal, the National Defense service medal and the Vietnam service medal.

A special night for Preston at the Washington County Fair

A special event went unnoticed to many during last week’s Washington County Fair. During the Thursday night appearance with country singer Scotty McCreery, former Fair Park Board President Peter Rettler made accommodations for a 16-year-old boy with Down syndrome to have an up-close view of his favorite performer during the song “Five more Minutes.

Preston attended the concert with his sister and parents.

It was his sister and best friend Julianne, 18, who saved up for the tickets and surprised her brother. Rettler made the experience that much more memorable.

Below is a note from Julianne about how the evening came about.

On our way home from spring break in March, we stopped at a Cracker Barrel for dinner. In the gift shop, Preston found Scotty’s new CD, “Seasons Change.” He wanted it so bad, but we were unable to provide to him at that time. Except we did! We got him the CD and surprised him with that in the car. During the ride home, I started to see if Scotty had any tours going on, and he did; right here in Wisconsin!

We kept the conversation quiet to avoid Preston from finding out. I thought it would be an awesome surprise for Preston’s first concert. (To answer your question on how I got money to pay for the tickets: I had some money saved up from working two jobs the previous summer.)

I was able to get seats for the concert, and thought it would be awesome to also try to buy meet and greet passes, which I did from Scotty’s website. (That whole process was very easy. I made some phone calls and everyone had answers and they were very friendly!) Since Preston and I both share a large amount of enjoyment for Scotty’s music, I thought it would be an awesome experience for the two of us.

It was difficult to keep it a secret, since we listen to Scotty McCreery everyday in the car. I wanted to tell him so bad, but I knew he wouldn’t stop talking about it!

I also wanted to see his face when we got to see Scotty in person, since he didn’t really know that we were actually going to meet Scotty McCreery!

The moment was priceless seeing Preston enjoy meeting someone he respects and looks up to. The whole night was a surreal experience, like we were living in a dream. He was dancing the whole time, and singing his heart out to every song.

Julianne

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Former Perkins Restaurant & Bakery for sale

The old Perkins Restaurant & Bakery, 2400 W. Washington Street, in West Bend is for sale.

Emmer Real Estate has the listing.

Perkins closed January 8, 2018. According to a story published on WashingtonCountyInsider.com on Jan. 12, 2018 franchise owner Pat Correll of CBT said corporate Perkins posted a remodel mandate that had to be completed by December 2018.

“That means franchisees like myself have to remodel all of our stores to their specifications by 2018 and that probably contributed to our decision at this time that it was not economically feasible at that location to move forward,” Correll said.

CBT leased the location since Rocky Rococo closed in late 1990. “I’ve been in there about 28 years as a Perkins,” Correll said. CBT has eight other Perkins locations in the Greater Milwaukee area. “Those locations will be in the process of remodeling however the West Bend location did not make the cut,” he said.

Emmer has the property listed at $995,000. The West Bend City Assessor said the 2017 assessed value is $1,011,000.

The property is described: For Lease / Sale Superior dine in or fast food restaurant, location on State Hwy 33, just West of US Hwy 45 in city of West Bend. All tables, equipment & fixtures included allowing for a quick start up for your new business. Large parking lot & signage on heavily traveled state highway 33. Easy ingress & egress w/controlled intersection & access boulevard thru Westwood association. Call for private showing & purchasing details.

On a history note: Perkins restaurant was built in 1990 and prior to that, according to the city assessor’s office, the location used to be home to Pizza Slices Inc., which did business as Rocky Rococo in May 1985. In June 1988 Pizza Slices Inc. sold to RAL West Bend Inc. and it sold again in 1991 to Julia E. Schloemer.

The property on W. Washington Street is currently owned by Mizpah Beach Properties LP out of San Diego, California. The property was purchased Aug. 1, 2006 for $1,807,024.

Jackson Police Chief retires

Jackson Police Chief Jed Dolnick has retired. Dolnick penned the note that follows: I’ve had the privilege of being Jackson’s Chief of Police since 2001. It’s now time for me to retire. Ryan Vossekuil, formerly Mayville’s police chief, will assume command on Monday, July 23.

I appreciate the support from the Village Board, Police & Fire Commission, and the residents of this fine community. Above all, I’m grateful for the professionalism and dedication of the officers and staff of the Jackson Police Department.

I’ve lost count of the number of times they’ve made me proud to be their chief.

Chief Dolnick

Groundbreaking at Bob’s Main Street Auto

An official groundbreaking this week as Keller Inc. started work to expand Bob’s Main Street Auto, 115 W. Decorah Road in West Bend. The plan includes approximately 3,300-square-foot building addition. Work should be finished by December 2018.

Keller, Planners, Architects, Builders, a Design/Build General Contractor, will build an addition and remodel current facilities for Bob’s Auto Main Street – Decorah Road under the direction of Keller Project Manager, Scott Lausten and Architect, Chris Manske.

Located at 115 W. Decorah Road in West Bend, construction will begin in June and is expected to be completed in December, 2018.

Parking update at West Bend Health Center and trolley details

Neighbors in West Bend want to know “what’s up with the trolley behind Kohl’s Department Store?” The simple answer is it’s part of the transportation plan for staff at the West Bend Health Center.

Earlier this week cyclone fencing was put up around the south end of the Health Center as contractors prepare to start work on the new facility at 1700 Paradise Drive.

With all the parking cordoned off there’s not enough space for staff and patients so staff is now parking behind Kohl’s and being shuttled back and forth to work.

Neighbors who visit the clinic are able to park on site. Signs direct patients to the north lot.

In October 2017 a story was posted on WashingtonCountyInsider.com about a new facility replacing the West Bend Health Center, 1700 W. Paradise Drive in West Bend.

The Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin felt a new facility would “meet long-term community needs for health services.”

At the time Tim Olsen, manager of public relations at Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin, said “The new building will enable more efficiencies and better support care processes and technology that have developed since the West Bend Health Center was built in 1990. The current health center will remain open to serve patients while the construction work is underway.”

The existing facility will remain open and operational while the new health center is under construction on the southeast end of the West Bend Health Center campus.

The new building is slated to open in early 2020. The existing building will be removed after the new facility opens.

Opening day for Kwik Trip

A bit of greenery was added to the corner of Decorah and Main in West Bend on Tuesday as landscapers planted brush and trees to add some color to the new Kwik Trip. The gas station / convenience store, 806 S. Main Street, is slated to open August 2. This is the second Kwik Trip in West Bend. The first opened Oct. 27, 2016 at 1750 S. Silverbrook Drive. The ribbon cutting for the new store is Wednesday, Aug. 8.

Slinger teen works toward Eagle Scout badge

Alex Lange of Slinger is undertaking a rather massive project as he works to earn his Eagle Scout badge. Lange is remodeling the patio area of the VFW / Jim’s Place in Slinger.

“This is an extensive project,” said VFW Commander Jim Lorch.

Lange said to date he has “raised a little over $1,000 and started demolishing the old flower bed.” Stay tuned as Lange provides updates on his progress as the Slinger High School student works to earn his Eagle Scout badge.

Update on Riverwalk construction in West Bend

Expect to see quite a bit more movement on the east side redevelopment of the downtown West Bend Riverwalk in the coming weeks as contractors step up the project.

During a public meeting Wednesday morning, July 18 at West Bend City Hall, Mitchell Leisses with Kunkel Engineering fielded questions and walked through some of the work ahead.

A couple of the primary concerns focused on the removal of the south bridge which will affect deliveries to some downtown businesses. Parking on Veterans Avenue was also a concern as several spaces on the west side of Veterans Avenue will be lost with

-The focus of the update is on the east side of West Bend Riverwalk.

-The City did removals for the project in June including the brick pavers and some trees and shrubs. Contractors have started dredging underneath the bridge.

-Storm sewer included in project and that will then move to redi-rock wall.

-The south pedestrian bridge will be pulled Monday, July 23 and businesses that use that for deliveries have been notified.

-Modifications will be made to the bridge abutments and it will take about two months to get another bridge in place.

-Trying to replicate the bridge to the north but the south bridge will be on a smaller scale.

-New river wall, decorative plaza areas and new walkway will run parallel with Veterans Avenue.

-Decorative lighting and railings.

-Placement of tight sheeting and installation of redi-rock wall will last a couple months.

-Concrete walkway along Veterans Avenue will be in September.

-The roundabout on the south end of Veterans Avenue will remain open during construction.

-Bridge is being taken by Jahnke Construction.

-Project should almost be finished by mid to late October. Ask for public to be patient and this can be time consuming

-There won’t be a lot of street parking on Veterans Avenue and contractors hope people can park on the east side of the road especially when 20-foot sheets of piling are being moved in. The traffic will not affect the Museum of Wisconsin Art

-The old bridge, also known as ‘Kevin’s Bridge’ had steel that’s rotted and only pedestrian traffic and dollies were allowed to cross at this time. That bridge is being replaced.

-Parking spots on the west side of Veterans Avenue are being removed just south of the driveway for the Museum of Wisconsin Art. Waiting confirmation on how many spots are eliminated.

-All permits have been passed by the DNR. Ready to go.

-Construction should be finished in late October/early November.

Washington County Sheriffs are following up on a single-vehicle motorcycle accident that happened Sunday at 6:14 p.m. on County Highway D just west of I-41.

Motorcyclist found injured in ditch following high-speed accident

According to report from Washington County Sheriff: Motorcycle in the ditch on County Hwy D west of I-41 on Sunday, July 15. Caller does not see the operator. Caller states motorcycle passed at high rate of speed; no helmet. Operator of motorcycle located in field. Man bleeding from head, conscious and talking. Man advised he was not driving but actually walking along the roadway when he was struck by someone else driving his motorcycle. Mayville man, 47, was arrested for his sixth offense OWI. Authorities are not looking for anyone else involved in the accident.

 

85th annual Seidemann Family Reunion

There were sunny skies and warm temps for the 85th annual Seidemann Friedrich Family Reunion.

Friends and family celebrated their 165th year in the U.S.  There were over 320 people at this year’s reunion at the Seidemann Farm in Newburg. As always there were games and contests and food and family and more food and family.

Some of the contests included:

Oldest male – Floyd Cook at 95.

Oldest female – Edna Steinert at 92 and Edna also won with the most grandchildren at 45

Longest married couple – Frank and Bernice Janke Haupt at 62 years

Youngest child – Leo Bohlman at 7 weeks

The person who traveled the farthest was Naomi and April Halpern who came in from Alaska.

Some of the events included: Face painting, a silent auction, Bingo, kuchen/dessert judging.

Updates & tidbits

Have you ever wanted to drive a tractor?  The opportunity awaits at this year’s 25th Annual Wisconsin Antique Power Reunion. The event will be July 21 and 22 at the Ozaukee County Pioneer Village, 4880 County Rd I, Saukville, WI. Come out and drive.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

-Relay for Life of West Bend will host its annual fundraiser Saturday, July 21 at Regner Park.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

– Circle August 2 on the calendar for the 2018 “Not Just A Walk In The Park 5k” managed by Horicon Bank. A fun run/walk through Riverside Park in West Bend with proceeds going to West Bend High School scholarships.    

Sign up today for the 8th Annual Swinging for Seniors Golf Outing at West Bend Lakes Golf Club. All proceeds benefit Senior Citizens Activities, Inc. Stick around after golf and take part in the Classics for a Cause Raffle and a chance to win a 1968 Ford Mustang.

– Kettle Moraine Lutheran High secured $21,248 in grants through the Wisconsin Department of Justice School Safety Grant program, administered by DOJ’s Office of School Safety.  “The nearly $4 million grants being awarded to large and small schools across the state, incentivizes school officials and law enforcement to make meaningful improvements to Wisconsin school safety through physical improvements and a focus on mental health training for school faculty,” said Attorney General Brad Schimel.

Legendary Whitetails presents 9th annual DeerFest

The 9th Annual DeerFest, presented by Legendary Whitetails, will take place on August 3 – 5 in West Bend, WI. Located at the Washington County Fairgrounds, DeerFest is the Nation’s Largest All Deer Festival, and this year is shaping up to be even bigger than before.

“Since Legendary Whitetails moved to Washington County in 2009, we have dedicated ourselves to building a national apparel brand that Celebrates the Hunt every day of the year,” explained Greg Huffman, President of Legendary Whitetails.  “It was an easy decision to partner with DeerFest and continue building this outstanding regional event to celebrate the tradition of deer hunting in Wisconsin.”

To show their appreciation to the passionate deer hunting enthusiasts, Legendary Whitetails will be giving away a $12 Promo Card (to match the cost of admission) and a free Legendary® bag to the first 2,000 attendees through the gate each day of DeerFest.

With leading industry professionals and manufacturers, tons of attractions, and hunting celebrity appearances, DeerFest is the perfect event for the whole family. Learn from DeerFest exclusive expert seminars, test all the hot new bows, watch industry-leading celebrities and pros compete in daily pop-up archery tournaments, and so much more. This year’s list of special attendees includes The Hunting Public, Taylor Drury, The Holder Family of Raised Hunting, and former Wisconsin Badger and Green Bay Packer wideout, Jared Abbrederis.

One new addition to this year’s festivities will be the inaugural Hunter’s Runway presented by Legendary Whitetails. This special one-night only event, occurring on Saturday night following the conclusion of DeerFest, will treat attendees to a taste of the newest fall hunting apparel, gear, and products from companies like Legendary Whitetails, DSG Outerwear, and other notable outdoor brands. The event will include a BBQ-style catered dinner, drinks, sneak peeks, and celebrity appearances. Everyone in attendance will leave with a value-packed door prize.

Tickets to all events are on sale now. For more information, including a complete list of attractions, visit deerfestwi.com

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

‘Protest art’ at Mayville Middle School Art Fair  (warning – adult content)

A piece of “protest art” by an 11th grader in the Mayville School District drew some harsh comments about what sort of education is being taught in the public schools in the small community of just over 4,900 in Dodge County.

Parents and taxpayers questioned the graphic nature of the piece that was part of a K-12 Art Fair held this past May at Mayville Middle School.

Lifelong Mayville resident Tom Jacquot was first to address the school board.

“I was told a student presented a picture of President Trump with words containing “PUSSY,” “PIECE OF ASS,” and “TREAT ‘EM LIKE SHIT” “PRETTY picture YOU DROPPING TO YOUR KNEES” written in big red letters on the piece. Donald Trump’s picture had a big red clown nose on it. So apparently it’s okay to use that kind of language now in the school district … that is … if it fits their narrative I guess!

I need to ask what the answers were to the younger students when they asked what the words really meant?

I’d like to know who in their right mind would think this was a fitting thing to do by presenting it! Schools are for teaching children and learning to be good citizens while respecting boundaries and acceptable behavior and norms. Tell me what is good about this?

School Board member Joe Hohmann passed out copies of the ‘protest art’ drawing prior to speaking to the board.  He mentioned how the student had First Amendment rights but was the Middle School Art Fair an appropriate venue for the piece.

After the art fair in May calls were placed to School Board President John Westphal and District Superintendent Scott Sabol. Neither returned calls or offered a comment.

On Wednesday night, Westphal responded to parent concerns saying “we will make sure there will be some consequences for this.”

Westphal said he “did not see the art.”

Board member Norber Dornfeldt said kids see this sort of stuff on television. Dornfeldt acknowledged the piece was in the Middle School but said he didn’t see it.

When two children from the Mayville Middle School came home and asked their parent about some of the words in the picture the parent said she tried to get a hold of teachers and administrators. Below is an email response from Mayville High School art teacher Sarah Heideman sent to a parent on May 23, 2018.

The school district’s Ted Hazelberg, also sent an email response to the parent on May 21, 2018.

From: Sarah Heideman <sheideman@mayville.k12.wi.us>

Date: Wed, May 23, 2018, 7:36 AM

Subject: Re: protest art – Invitation to view

Cc:, Scott Sabol <ssabol@mayville.k12.wi.us>, Bob Clark <bclark@mayville.k12.wi.us>, Ted Hazelberg <thazelberg@mayville.k12.wi.us >, John Schlender <jschlender@mayville.k12.wi.us >, Jessica Stortz <jstortz@mayville.k12.wi.us>

My student’s assignment was to create a talking conversation through a piece of artwork about something that they felt strongly about. The fact that a discussion is happening is a positive outcome, as well as, a learning opportunity. In the process, I apologise for not thinking about the placement and content for a younger viewer, since the show is over, I cannot fix it this year, but can promise in the future that these things will be addressed and learned from.

Thank you for raising the questions,

Sarah Heideman

From: Ted Hazelberg [mailto:thazelberg@mayville. k12.wi.us]

Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 8:00 PM

Cc: Scott Sabol; Sarah Heideman; Bob Clark; John Schlender; Jessica Stortz

Subject: Fwd: protest art – Invitation to view

Good Evening,

I copied your message that you sent to me through ClassDojo down below. I included others in this response as well.

I understand your concern about a certain piece of art that was displayed at the Middle School Art Show this past weekend. I have no control over what pieces of art are being displayed. I do know that there was a sign near this piece of art that talked about protesting. Please see slides 8 and 9 in Mrs. Heideman’s slide presentation in Google Slides.

If you feel the need to talk with someone who was in charge of the show, please contact Sarah Heideman, High School Art teacher. I have already talked to Sarah about your concern. She can answer any of your questions/concerns regarding this situation. Respectfully, Ted Hazelberg

Board member Joe Hohmann said he thinks this is a big part of the First Amendment but it was inappropriate for the art show because Mayville is a family-oriented school district.  “Every parent should be questioning what are we teaching our students but they should know that hopefully from this point going forward no conduct like this will end up happening in the future,” he said.

On June 14, 2018 the principal from Mayville Middle School, John Schlender sent a letter to parents in the Mayville School District. A parent forwarded that letter, which she received on Wednesday, June 20, 2018. The final entry notes Schlender is leaving for a new position as Educational Consultant with CESA 6 in Oshkosh. Board president Westphal said Schlender did not leave because of the ‘protest art’ incident but because he was offered another job.

Below are the full comments from life-long Mayville resident Tom Jacquot.

I was told a student presented a picture of President Trump with words containing “PUSSY”, “PIECE OF ASS”, and “TREAT ‘EM LIKE SHIT” “PRETTY picture YOU DROPPING TO YOUR KNEES” written in big red letters on the piece. Donald Trump’s picture had a big red clown nose on it. So apparently it’s okay to use that kind of language now in the school district … that is … if it fits their narrative I guess!

I need to ask what the answers were to the younger students when they asked what the words really meant?

I’d like to know who in their right mind would think this was a fitting thing to do by presenting it! Schools are for teaching children and learning to be good citizens while respecting boundaries and acceptable behavior and norms. Tell me what is good about this? And we wonder why children think nothing of harming one another if this is what is being taught or promoted! And the artwork was not just promoted or taught…it was held up as the crowning jewel… It won! I wish I really knew how and who voted to make it the winning entry. And then it was sent on to the Art Contest at UW-WC as representative of what is the best Mayville School District can offer??? Really?

The picture won so why isn’t it prominently shown here at the Administration District office along with all of the others? It was on the School District Facebook page last week but suddenly it was removed yesterday. Could you tell me why?

A caveat. If the student was trying to show that Sexual and other types of harassment are wrong, they certainly succeeded but was there any notation to that effect on the picture by the student. None that I could tell from what I could see after having the picture forwarded to me.

Would the art teacher have felt it okay if it was a picture of herself, a fellow student, the Principal, the Administrator?

Some of the Mayville School District following policies that I will list discuss Sexual and Other forms of Harassment and each one was blatantly disregarded and willfully broken by the student and then condoned by the Art? Teacher when the student’s artwork? If you can even call it that; was presented here at Mayville and at UW – WC.

5720, 5517, 5516, 5600, 0145

IMHO The teacher has proven to be untrustworthy and shown to be incapable of following the rules and policies of the school district! By condoning this picture.

I want to know why no other teachers or member of the Administration (look directly at Scott Sabel) didn’t have enough guts to pull this picture knowing it violated multiple school district policies which I have previously listed. I can’t believe not one of the teachers pulled it out!!!  Are they ALL that morally inept? In my mind they are just as complicit as the Art??? Teacher in condoning this. Or was it because this is not really original artwork.

I hope that because the Art??? Teacher willfully broke not one but several District policies by condoning this disgusting piece that she will be immediately dismissed for just cause and not simply given a slap on the wrist and told oh, you should have known better.

I’d like to finish with this thought.

“Do you honestly believe it is ok to degrade women by making these types of comments, so then “why is it ok to have that picture presented as part of the artwork representing Mayville School District at its best.”

West Bend Baseball Association makes a pitch for funding to West Bend School Board

Members of the West Bend Baseball Association spoke before the West Bend School Board on Monday and asked the board for support in helping match a $500,000 grant from the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation to make improvements to Carl Kuss Field at Regner Park.

This past May the West Bend Common Council signed off on a Memorandum of Understanding in which matching funds would come from the City, WBBA, private donations and the West Bend School District.

That plan, however was quickly set aside after the school district announced it hadn’t agreed to the deal.

During Monday’s meeting the WBBA’s John Rozak brought forth a message to the board from West Bend Mayor Kraig Sadownikow.

“To date the city of West Bend council has agreed to sign a memorandum of understanding with $100,000 in cash to Carl Kuss Field and a minimum of $75,000 in-kind labor and equipment for the project

How many know that Regner Park was home of the baseball summer league championship for over 20 years. Now summer baseball is gone and there needs to be a place to play spring baseball and through this project we’ll have a facility to give opportunity to play baseball in the spring in West Bend.

Right now the ability to play at either Regner or the high school diamond would be very limited.

The city is willing to do something and additionally both City Administrator Jay Shambeau and the Mayor are willing to entertain a $100,000 5-year amortized loan to the district to be paid back to the city. This would still need council approval.

We’re looking for a great partnership with the Baseball Association, the school district and the community.

This is a great opportunity with money from the Cal Ripken Foundation, the Baseball Association and the City and hope the school district will also participate.

It’s a facility that can be used for a lot of things. It would be a great addition to the City.”

West Bend Baseball Association President Willie Mueller also spoke briefly to the board. “Looking to help Regner Park and  with the City of West Bend and hopefully the help school board to make a park the community would enjoy going to. We did this at Concordia and it thrived.  You guys have an opportunity to do something like that and all I can do is ask,” said Mueller.

Howard Henrich also spoke to the board as a parent to secure a multi-use facility for the community. Henrich said there are “milestones and hurdles to overcome” and “this is a high priority for the greater community.”

Henrich mentioned how the multi-use facility could be used for a variety of sports and different leagues. “I currently umpire at high school baseball field and I feel it is in suspect condition,” he said.

Craig Larsen then spoke on behalf of the WBBA.  “This is an opportunity to do something in the community and give back to the school district,” he said. “The facility at Regner Park is beyond repair.”

The board is expected to take up discussion in July surrounding the $500,000 matching grant and its potential participation in the project.

Pillars Pub sold

A big weekend on tap at Pillars Pub, 225 S. Fifth Avenue, West Bend.  After nine years Pat Kent is selling the establishment and moving on but he plans to WOOP it up big over the next three days and exit with a shebang. Kent said the biggest thing he will miss about the business is the friendships he made.

Pillars has been sold to Tom and Ashley Mitchell and they open July 5. The new establishment will be called Blondie Pop. Entertainment this weekend at Pillars Pub: Sat. June 23 – Illusion 8:30 p.m. and Sun. June 24 – 5 Card Stud 2 p.m.

Memorial dedication in Kewaskum for Larry Ammel | By Roger Strack

There was a nice dedication memorial for Larry Ammel at River Hill Park in Kewaskum on Tuesday night. The event included a dedication of the recently refurbished band stand along with a memorial stone in honor of Larry Ammel, who passed away April 16, 2017 at the age of 73.

Ammel moved to Kewaskum in 1973.  He served as the high school band director and adviser to a large number of student groups in Kewaskum until his retirement in 1999.

He was an active member of the Kewaskum community serving on the village board, Kiwanis Club, American Red Cross, Big Band, Kettle Moraine Symphony and the Kewaskum Area Arts Council.

He served as Choir Director at Peace United Church of Christ for over 30 years, where he directed the chancel choir, women’s choir and men’s choir. He was instrumental in the formation of the  local group, the “Ecumen”, a men’s choir consisting of men from multiple communities and denominations.

The ceremony was presented by the Kewaskum Kiwanis Club. The ceremony was followed by a concert by the Goodtime Dutchmen at Music in the Park.

Colin DeYoung was recognized for painting the bandstand as part of his Eagle Scout project.

In the days since his passing his family has been contacted by many of his former students, expressing not only their condolences for his passing, but sharing how he touched their lives in meaningful and irrevocable ways.  They described his role as their teacher and mentor citing how “Mr. Ammel” was the one that listened, encouraged, and believed in them when they needed it most.

West Bend School Board debates location of Pathways Charter School

The West Bend School Board held a lengthy discussion Monday night about the future of Pathways Charter School. The issue was the location of the school and whether a new site could be found within the next two months.

The item on the table was a 1-year extension of the contract for the Charter school, open to grades 7 – 12 at 1430 S. Main Street. There are generally about 60 students enrolled each year.

Board President Joel Ongert took issue with the location of the school which is house in the Mutual Mall on Main Street in West Bend.  “My sticking point is the safety. My understanding is it’s a shared facility. Doors aren’t secured. Close to Main Street. That being said – I want to amend the motion through June 30 of 2019 and add at location other than current location,” said Ongert.

Board member Ken Schmidt aske if it was reasonable to consider that. “We don’t have a lot of time. Unless someone in this body has a place. I share the same concerns but I look at reasonable compromises. We need to have a facility available for those who are enrolled in Pathways Charter School. If we can’t find one then there’s no Pathways. No other facility – no Pathways – I could not support that and I don’t think it’s reasonable.”

Some other talking points included:

– We would have capacity at the high school but we would need to determine the optimal location. Pathways reviewed a location at the HS and had some suggestions and there were drawbacks.

– Laura Jackson said, “We could look further within our own buildings. Look further anywhere. Not up to date on available space within the community.”

– Board member Nancy Justman, “I have same concerns. I’m not willing to say ‘No Pathways’ and that’s not fair to students. I charge this board and the governance council.  I won’t support it either – I don’t want Pathways in jeopardy.”

– Ongert said, “I don’t want Pathways to end either. My only holdup is the location.”

– Ken Schmidt said, “Are all our facilities totally safe. We can’t prevent every safety problem. If we can’t come up with an alternate location that would be safer than the one we have then it would be my thought and go ahead some improvements to the safety of the building so it would  – but if we can’t secure something in the next few weeks we need to move forward with improving the facility we have.”

-Board member Tonnie Schmidt – “I don’t have any hard evidence. If there’s room at the high school and even less than ideal – I’d like to see more information on that.”

-Board member Chris Zweigart – “We’re so close to the deadline. I wish we had more time and we don’t. This is the year we need to take a very hard look at this. Because of the tight timeline I agree with Mr. Schmidt.”

Vote taken on Ongert motion to approve and at any location other than current location.  Motion fails 6-1 with only Ongert in favor.

Approve one year extension through June 30.

Ongert – “My hope is to find a location so they are not in that building. Not a blade of grass, parking 2-feet from classrooms, on the main drag, and cosmetically it’s not WB’s finest. My plea to the governance council and lead teachers at Pathways – let’s try to work with district and find something soon.”

Board member Kurt Rebholz –  “There were concerns when this agreement was signed five years ago. It doesn’t take long to set up a committee to evaluate other sites.  We do want a safe school environment and let’s start evaluating.”

Ken Schmidt – “It’s not fair to lay this responsibility at the feet of the governance board.”

Tonnie Schmidt – “They never had the chance to explore an environment that’s best for them. I don’t want the governance council to feel responsible and alone I’d like to empower them and we should consider their opinions.”

Vote 7-0 to approve a 1-year extension of Pathways Charter School at its current location, 1430 S. Main Street.

Cobblestone Hotel & Suites and Wissota Chop House restaurant open in Hartford

It was September 2017 when ground was first broken for Cobblestone Hotel & Suites and Wissota Chop House restaurant on Highway 60/ 110 E. Sumner Street in Hartford. Fast forward nine months and the new restaurant and hotel are now open.

A quick look inside the four-story hotel shows a head nod to Hartford history along with upper-midscale accommodations that mix “convenience, comfort and extraordinary customer care.”

Jeremy Griesbach, a 1992 graduate of Hartford Union High School, is the president of development with BriMark Builders, LLC a division of Cobblestone Builders. He felt there’s always been a missing piece to the hotel puzzle in Hartford.

“For the past 20 years of so I’ve always thought we were missing that business hotel in town and that quality lodging,” Griesbach said. “We were always losing those people to the surrounding communities and anytime somebody doesn’t stay here they’re not eating here or buying gas here and now we’re finally getting something done.”

For Hartford it’s a “shot in the arm for the community” according to Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Scott Henke.

Historic photos at the hotel are courtesy retired Hartford Police officer and Hartford Historical Preservation Foundation Board Member Troy Fassbender and the Hartford Historical Society. There are a number of historic sepia photos in every room and a framed picture of Hartford’s Peace Celebration in every bathroom.

Aside from the restaurant and ease of access to downtown Main Street the hotel also offers a pool, fitness room, and a complimentary breakfast.

Contract released for new West Bend Superintendent

On May 29 the West Bend School District announced it hired Don Kirkegaard as the new Superintendent. Kirkegaard is scheduled to start in the district July 9.  His contract is public record and highlights include an annual salary of $175,000, moving expenses up to $15,000 and the “District shall annually contribute 6% of the Superintendent’s salary ($10,500) to a 403 (b) retirement account. The salary for the last superintendent in West Bend was $155,000.

Blue Lotus Retreat Center receives Grant

Bader Philanthropies, Inc., one of southeastern Wisconsin’s top 10 foundations, announced its board of directors has approved a $20,000 grant to Blue Lotus Farm and Retreat Center, which provides recreational and therapeutic outdoor opportunities for older adults living with life challenges, as well as children and adults.

The funding, distributed across two years, will allow Blue Lotus to continue providing opportunities and day retreats for older adults, most of whom visit from urban areas in Milwaukee and have little exposure to natural settings. Blue Lotus, is located at 5501 County Highway M in West Bend, operates from May through October and served more than 4,000 individuals in 2017.

The grant from Bader Philanthropies will help Blue Lotus with programming, supplies, snacks, and other needs for the older adults that visit the retreat each year.

9th annual West Bend Community Foundation Donor Recognition | By Joan Rudnitzki

The Board of Directors for the West Bend Community Foundation hosted its ninth annual Donor Recognition event at Old Settlers Park on June 20. The event celebrates the accomplishments of the Foundation and the area nonprofits the Foundation supports.

As part of the evening’s program, the Foundation selected the Boys and Girls Clubs of Washington County as the winner of its Founders’ Service Award. This award recognizes an organization that used a West Bend Community Foundation grant for a special project/program that significantly benefitted the West Bend community.

Peter Ziegler, President of the West Bend Community Foundation and the son of Doug Ziegler one of the founders of the West Bend Community Foundation, offered some comments and impressive numbers about the work the Foundation has done over the past 20 years.

Updates & tidbits

– The Barbershop, a hair salon for men, is now open in West Bend, 2028 S. Main Street. Take a tour and then stop in for a cut, shampoo, trim and signature shoulder massage and hot towel. It’s the 50th location for owner Todd Degner and his wife Shannon. “We are a male-centric salon designed specifically for men. It’s something that straddles between a traditional barbershop and a salon,” Degner said. “We have a comfortable, timeless look and feel that’s the same for men and boys and grandpas and students and millionaires.”

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

-Relay for Life of West Bend will host its annual fundraiser Saturday, July 21 at Regner Park.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

Unveiling the new Gehl Foods Performing Arts Pavilion in Germantown | By Andrew Davis

Smiling faces filled the grounds at Fireman’s Park in Germantown on Wednesday for the official unveiling of the Gehl Foods Performing Arts Pavilion.

The Pavilion was introduced in 2009 as a concept for a small band shell structure in the middle of the park. The Germantown community loved the idea, and many individuals and businesses generously donated to the project.

Several of these donors were present Wednesday afternoon including representatives from Fibreform Containers Incorporated, and Keller Incorporated, as well as three members of the Marine Corp League Kettle Moraine Detachment.

Several members of the Gehl family were also at the event. Gehl Foods, a leading manufacturer of dairy-based products, has been based in Germantown for over a century.

The Gehl family created a wave of enthusiasm for the project with an upfront $100,000 donation and later an additional $25,000 donation.

The Germantown Kiwanis also played a huge role in the development of the Pavilion. John Krause, a member of the Kiwanis, led a campaign that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars and kept the interest high.

The plan for a small band shell gave way to a beautiful pavilion that will become the focus of many Germantown activities. The Village President of Germantown, Dean Wolter, emphasized that, “This pavilion will act not only as grounds for celebrations such as 4th of July, but also as a prominent performance arts center in Germantown.”

Wolter continued by accentuating the support the community has had for the project.

When referring to the foundation of the stage, which is constructed of bricks with the engraved names of some of the more prominent donors on them, Wolter commented, “Each one of these bricks represents a person or a family who believed in this project, and expressed that support through a rather large donation. Behind those, are the bricks that were purchased when people donated $25, $10, or $5. No matter the donation size, everyone in the community was part of this process, and we will all be able to enjoy this fantastic new addition to this park.”

The official program concluded with the cutting of a ceremonial ribbon, but the festivities were far from over. Afterward popcorn, soda, and snacks were provided for those in attendance.

At this point, the Germantown Community Band filed onto the Pavilion. This band, directed by Jim Barnes, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, and the band’s many diverse members were thrilled to be playing on the newly-opened stage.

As the first notes of the Star Spangled Banner erupted from the brass and wind instruments, it became evident the Gehl Foods Performing Arts Pavilion was well worth all the time, effort, and dedication.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

OSHA involved in investigating deadly accident on Wallace Lake

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is now involved in looking into the accident Thursday on Wallace Lake that led to the death of an 81-year-old man.

Authorities said the investigation shows there were no holes in the weed cutting machine/pontoon that capsized just after noon on June 15.

Officials from the DNR suspect the machine “may have been overloaded with weeds.

The DNR said it “appears the weed cutter was heading back to where it was unloaded and it may have been top heavy.”

The Washington County Sheriff said the weed cutter machine was about 10 years old.

The DNR said the part of the lake where the accident occurred had a “mucky bottom” and not a sand bottom.

Officials said Merlin Waechter from the town of Trenton lived a few doors down from the accident site on Wallace Lake. He had been doing the weed cutting for a couple years and had a passion for it. Funeral services for Merlin Waechter are pending.

Man accused of killing nun from Slinger set to plead guilty

The man accused of the brutal murder of two nuns, one from Slinger, WI is expected to plead guilty.

Sister Margaret Held, SSSR of Slinger and her friend, Sr. Paula Merrill were attacked and killed in their home in Durant, MS on April 25, 2016. Rodney Sanders faced capital murder charges in Holmes County Court.

The nuns were working at a medical clinic in Lexington, Mississippi. Both women died from multiple stab wounds.

According to a story in the Holmes County Herald, A Mississippi prosecutor said Tuesday, June 12, that a man charged with killing two nuns in 2016 will plead guilty as part of an agreement that removes the possibility of the death penalty.

District Attorney Akillie Malone-Oliver told The Associated Press she spoke with the victims’ families before agreeing that Robert Earl Sanders of Kosciusko, Mississippi, could plead guilty to capital murder. She said the agreement calls for him to be sentenced to life without parole.

Malone-Oliver said the decision takes into consideration that the two women who were killed, Sisters Margaret Held and Paula Merrill, opposed the death penalty.

Sanders’ next court appearance, according to the Holmes County Herald, is set for “June 21 before Circuit Judge Jannie Lewis in Belzoni.”

In October 2017, Held’s sister Jean Kroll of Slinger spoke briefly about the attack.   “I’m just numb,” said Kroll.  Her sister was 68.

“In order to protect my heart and my sight I don’t want to think of him,” she said of Sanders. “I don’t want to hate him because that’s what I would end up doing. I don’t want that.

“I just pity him,” said Kroll.

“I just love… that’s the only thing I can do but I do pity him for what he did,” she said.

On Sept. 2, 2016 friends and family gathered at Resurrection Catholic Church in Allenton to remember Sister Margaret Held.

Rev. Rick Stoffel from St. Peter Church in Slinger presided over the service.

There were messages of forgiveness and acceptance throughout the Mass. The opening hymn, Canticle of Sun, included the words, “Praise for our death that makes our life real, the knowledge of loss that helps us to feel; the gift of yourself, your presence revealed to bring us home.”

The message from the second reading, Romans 14:7-9, echoed the theme of the Mass. “No one lives for one’s self and no one dies for one’s self.”

During the homily, surrounded by the whirring hum of large fans, Rev. Stoffel told the gathering, “It is not important how Margaret Held died it’s how she lived.”

“Sister Margaret knew her life was in the hands of God even when there would be changes of direction,” he said. “Fear would be foolish and faith would be wise.”

Dressed in a white robe with a pattern of gold inlay, Rev. Stoffel worked his way down the aisle and spoke of how Sister Margaret “found her niche where she was needed the most.”

“Only by mercy it is not so much how she died it’s important how she lived and to tell one another so we’re more than just about ourselves,” Stoffel said.

Sr. Margaret Held, SSSF joined her Lord on Aug. 25, 2016 in Durant, MS at the age of 68, along with her beloved friend, Sr. Paula Merrill. She was born and raised in Slinger.

July 4 fireworks in Hartford may be in jeopardy

The July 4th fireworks in Hartford are in jeopardy.  The City of Hartford and the Hartford Chamber of Commerce are putting out a plea to anyone who would like to sponsor or donate to the event.

“We’re told by Monday, June 18, we have to order them or take a pass on this year,” said Hartford City Administrator Steve Volkert. “And right now we don’t have enough money for fireworks.”

He asks that support be turned over to the Chamber of Commerce by Friday, June 15.

“If we don’t have $7,000 collected by Monday, June 18 we will be cancelling the Fourth of July fireworks in Hartford,” said Volkert.

Volkert said, in the past, there have been specific companies that have stepped forward to sponsor the show. “Whatever the situation we can’t go ahead and order $9,000 worth of fireworks with less than $2,000 in our pocket,” he said.

Last May the Hartford Chamber sent a standard letter in the utility bills asking neighbors to donate to the fireworks. Vokert said the time is short to get funding together.

Washington Co. Sheriff candidates air views during forum

This week Common Sense Citizens of Washington County hosted a candidate forum for the two men running to replace Dale Schmidt as Washington County Sheriff.

About 60 people were in attendance during the forum held at the West Bend Moose Lodge.

Candidates Martin Schulteis and Jason Guslick spent a little more than an hour fielding questions about 2nd Amendment rights, a proposed drug court for Washington County, staffing, budgets, and growing gang activity. The primary election is Tuesday, August 14.

Former Slinger H.S. band director sentenced

Former Slinger High School band director David Hanke has been sentenced to five years in prison with five years extended supervision. Hanke was found guilty in a jury trial April 25 in Washington County Circuit Court. He faced felony charges following accusations of sexual assault of a student. The trial and sentencing occurred in Judge James Pouros court.

Totals are in for 31st annual Washington Co. Breakfast on the Farm

It took organizers of the 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm less than 24 hours to tall the number of guests and how much they ate during Saturday’s event at Gehring View Farm in Hartford.

According to Mike Strupp with the Washington County Dairy Promotion Committee volunteers served 4,265 people.

That included: 5,650 half pints of milk, 14,000 pancakes, 114 gallons of ice cream, 660 pounds of breakfast sausages, 462 dozen of eggs, 400 cheese curds, and 250 pounds strawberries

Also during the event three graduates from area high schools were awarded $1,000 scholarships. Recipients included Brandon Strupp of Hartford Union High School, Olivia Push from Hartford Union High School and Emily Kluever from Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School.

New nativity for West Bend arrives

It was like Christmas in June at the Downtown West Bend Association on Monday as staff and Ramiro Paz with Thrivent Financial unwrapped pieces from the new nativity.

“Oh this is nice,” said Paz as he pulled the plastic wrap down to unveil the Joseph statue.

A semi arrived just after 10 a.m. with the delivery. A hand truck was used to remove three pallets of large cardboard boxes; each piece of the nativity was individually wrapped.

For the past few years the DWBA has been discussing the condition of the historic Amity Rolf’s nativity. The pieces date to the late 1960s. Spending Christmas season in the elements of harsh Wisconsin winters has taken a toll on the set and last year vandals destroyed the baby Jesus.

Donations were accepted to try and replace the figurine but then Thrivent Financial stepped forward to fund a new nativity.

“We’re very blessed and clearly with us being a Christian organization it’s part of what we do and this lines up with our values so we’re excited for the community,” Paz said.

Representatives from Thrivent Financial that contributed to the donation include: Lisa Senkbeil, Nikole Kohn, Paz and Peter Kapler.

“The nativity scene plays an important role in our community and wanted to do what we could to bring the replacement to fruition,” Lisa Senkbiel said.

Nikole Kohn said, “It can be easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of shopping at so many of our great downtown businesses, and this nativity scene provides a great visual that helps us all reflect on the purpose of Christmas.”

Peter Kapler added, “Thrivent Financial is an organization of Christian members, who seek to enhance our community and spread our mission of living generously by giving back to the people and communities that are important to us.”

There are 10 pieces in the life-size nativity. Some new items include a chicken in the manger and baby Jesus is attached to his crib.

The new nativity will be unveiled in November prior to the West Bend Christmas Parade.

The Amity Rolfs nativity will stay local. Discussions are underway with an area parish to put that nativity on display.

Heavy Cottonwood seed in Washington County

There’s been a rather heavy cottonwood seeding this year in the West Bend and Washington County area. A white cottony substance can be seen floating through town, clinging to entryway rugs and collecting in tufts along the grassy edge of the sidewalk.

According to Riveredge Nature Center in Newburg the cottony-covered seed is a reproductive part of the female cottonwood tree. The cottonwood seeding process normally happens in late May through June. Heavy rains may also have led to the increase in seeds.

Dedication of memorial for Larry Ammel is June 19 in Kewaskum

It was April 16, 2017 when word started spreading across the small community of Kewaskum that Larry Ammel, 73, had died.

Ammel moved to Kewaskum in 1973.  He served as the high school band director and adviser to a large number of student groups in Kewaskum until his retirement in 1999.

He was an active member of the Kewaskum community serving on the village board, Kiwanis Club, American Red Cross, Big Band, Kettle Moraine Symphony and the Kewaskum Area Arts Council.  He served as Choir Director at Peace United Church of Christ for over 30 years, where he directed the chancel choir, women’s choir and men’s choir.   He was instrumental in the formation of the local group, the “Ecumen”, a men’s choir consisting of men from multiple communities and denominations.

In the days since his passing his family has been contacted by many of his former students, expressing not only their condolences for his passing, but sharing how he touched their lives in meaningful and irrevocable ways. They described his role as their teacher and mentor citing how “Mr. Ammel” was the one that listened, encouraged, and believed in them when they needed it most.

Coming up June 19 there will be a dedication memorial for Larry Ammel at River Hill Park in Kewaskum. The event gets underway at 6 p.m.

The recently refurbished band stand will be dedicated and there will be a memorial stone in honor of Ammel.

The ceremony is presented by the Kewaskum Kiwanis Club. The ceremony will take place before the Goodtime Dutchmen play for Music in the Park.

Updates & tidbits

Eaton’s Fresh Pizza will hold a soft open starting Wednesday, June 20 at 830 E. Paradise Drive in West Bend.

Please be aware that counterfeit $100 bills are being passed in the Kewaskum area. Businesses should contact local law enforcement and advise if they have any in their possession.

-The US Cellular outlet in West Bend celebrated its expansion with a ribbon cutting this week, June 13. The store, 2025 W. Washington Street, underwent a major interior remodel. Stop in and check out the new look and enjoy refreshments and in-store gifts and specials.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

-Relay for Life of West Bend will host its annual fundraiser Saturday, July 21 at Regner Park.

-Full time and part-time bartenders wanted at the V.F.W. Post 1393, 260 Sand Drive, West Bend. Call Jerry Faber for details 262-388-7006.

Executive Director of Camp Awana dies at 43

Kurt Halvorsen, the Executive Director of Camp Awana in Fredonia, WI, passed away Thursday, June 7, due to a stroke.

Camp Awana issued this statement on Facebook, “It is with a heavy heart that we share that our executive director, Kurt, unexpectedly went home to be with the Lord this morning.”

Halvorsen, 43, joined the staff of Camp Awana in 2012 where he served until the time of his death.

Kurt Halvorsen was born October 8, 1974 and passed away Thursday, June 7, 2018.

Funeral services for Kurt will be held at 3 p.m. on Monday, June 18, 2018, at Kettlebrook Church, 2378 W. Washington Street West Bend, WI 53095.

Visitation at the Kettlebrook Church from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 18, 2018.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Halvorsen Family or to Camp Awana/Latham Christian Camping.

He was raised in Elmwood Park, IL, and graduated from Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL, with a BA in Youth Ministry. He served for 15 years in youth ministry. Halvorsen leaves behind his wife, Kristy, and three children, Bryce, Trent and Mackenzie. Funeral services are pending.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Is there life ahead for Sausage Plus in West Bend

The West Bend Common Council voted unanimously Monday night on an Original Class A Combination liquor license and the name of the business was West Bend Sausage Plus.

The address on the license application was 1435 W. Washington Avenue (Street). Neighbors in West Bend are familiar with that location as it was formerly Ries’ Sausage Plus.

It was February 2018 when we first reported “Neighbors coming home from work Thursday afternoon reacted with a bit of shock to find the doors closed at Ries’ Sausage Plus Spirits Meat & Deli, 1435 W. Washington Street in West Bend.”

A white sign on the door read ‘We are closed until further notice. Thank you.’

Sammy Toor of Illinois had been the previous owner of the business.

Over the past five months there’s been little movement at the store.

Paperwork at City Hall show Ben Houle of Cedarburg applied for the liquor license May 17, 2018. A bit of research on Houle links him to a business called Butchers Catering.

The web page and business Facebook page talk about, ”Our open grill concept allows your guests to watch the pig or rotisserie chickens openly spin over hot coals for hours during your event.”

Calls have been placed to Houle. Early word is there are plans to open after July 4. We’ll bring you more details when they become available.

Executive Director of Camp Awana dies at 43

Kurt Halvorsen, the Executive Director of Camp Awana in Fredonia, WI, passed away Thursday, June 7, due to a stroke.

Camp Awana issued this statement on Facebook, “It is with a heavy heart that we share that our executive director, Kurt, unexpectedly went home to be with the Lord this morning.”

Halvorsen, 43, joined the staff of Camp Awana in 2012 where he served until the time of his death.

He was raised in Elmwood Park, IL, and graduated from Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL, with a BA in Youth Ministry. He served for 15 years in youth ministry. Halvorsen leaves behind his wife, Kristy, and three children, Bryce, Trent and Mackenzie. Funeral services are pending.

Slinger H.S. grad makes Junior World Championship team

The past two days have been rather surreal for Lexi Bullis. The 18-year-old graduated Slinger High School, was making plans to leave in August for college in Colorado and she woke up to find Monday morning that she made the snowboard Junior World Championship team and will be going to New Zealand to compete.

“I’m one of three girls in the U.S. to be invited to participate and the only one from the Midwest,” said Bullis.

It was early Monday when Bullis was surfing the web on her phone when she found her name on the list. “I was freaking out,” she said. “I ran down the stairs and told my mom and we’re all real excited but it’s very nerve wracking but it’s also a huge opportunity I don’t want to pass up.”

Bullis started snowboard racing three years ago after switching over from downhill ski racing.

“My competition will be in my age group but the best snowboarders from around the world,” she said.

Bullis said her strength is she’s fearless going downhill and she knows how to “work the board.”

“My ultimate goal is to get to the World Cup and this may actually help me get there,” Bullis said.

Below is the official notice Bullis received from the FIX SBX Junior World Championships.

Bullis said she will be dry-land training the next few months and fundraising to help cover the costs for the upcoming travel/competition.

West Bend teen Salutatorian at St. Mary’s Springs                   By Chelsea McKay

Leah Zimmer, the daughter of Greg and Mary Zimmer of West Bend, is the St. Mary’s Springs Academy Salutatorian of the 2018 graduating class.

In addition to her outstanding academic record, Leah has been involved in National Honor Society, the Academic Bowl, Student Ambassadors, Parish Youth Leadership group, the Chess and Math teams and VEX Robotics/Ledger Logistics serving as the Design Engineering Secretary.

She has been a part of the SMSA Varsity tennis team, Drama Department, and Musical Liturgy group.

Leah was very active in the community by assisting as a tutor, alter server at Mass, a volunteer at Parish Festivals, preparing meals and serving at Loaves and Fishes.

Additionally, Leah received many honors and awards including being named Flyway Conference Academic Excellence Award as one of the top 10 graduates of 2018, Rotary Student of the Month, Youth Optimist Senior Award Recipient, and Student Achiever Award in Achievement and Effort.

Leah will attend St. Norbert College in the fall and plans to major in Secondary Education in English and Physics, hoping to one day become a high school teacher or an editor.

MOWA secures City of West Bend Tourism Grant

The City of West Bend Tourism Commission recently handed out $15,000 in tourism grants.

The Museum of Wisconsin Art secured a $12,500 grant for its upcoming Art & Chalk Fest, July 28 and 29.

“We applied for the grant in May and we put together a marketing plan that showed how our event would bring people to the city and especially how the event would encourage people to spend the night,” said MOWA Director of Communications and Marketing Jessica Wildes.

“We’re really excited to be awarded the grant and it will really help cover our marketing budget with ad placements in Chicago and Madison.”

There were four proposals reviewed by the West Bend Tourism Commission.  Another local entity to receive money was Habitat for Humanity and Germanfest in August.

Over 10,000 people attended the inaugural Art & Chalk Fest in 2017. “This year we’ve already received over 16,000 RSVP’s on our Facebook page and we can feel the momentum is building for the event,” said Wildes.

In its application MOWA described the Art & Chalk Fest as:

MOWA’s Art & Chalk Fest is a celebratory weekend of art and an opportunity to feature all that West Bend has to offer. The festival will take place on the museum campus July 28–29, 2018 with an anticipated audience of 15,000+ visiting downtown West Bend over the two-day period. Festival hours are 9:00–5:00 on Saturday and 10:00–4:00 on Sunday.

The festival is the largest of its kind in Washington County. MOWA’s parking lot turns into a canvas for artists to create unbelievable ten foot by ten foot masterpieces in chalk that dramatically unfold throughout the weekend. The area surrounding the chalk artists offers activities for all ages. This year, the festival will expand to Veterans Avenue to accommodate more festival fun.

MOWA explained in its grant proposal how it would use the grant to benefit other entities in the community.

One of the primary goals of Art & Chalk Fest is to attract visitors to West Bend not only for the museum and event, but for the entire weekend to shop, dine, stay in hotels, explore the Eisenbahn State Trail and Milwaukee Riverwalk, and enjoy all of the fantastic amenities that the city offers. The festival was designed to be something truly unique that would draw visitors from more than 150 miles of West Bend, which includes Chicago, Rockford, Madison, Oshkosh, Appleton, Green Bay, Sheboygan, Milwaukee, Wausau, Dubuque, and more.

Art & Chalk Fest will increase traffic at local businesses through exposure in marketing and sponsorship materials, direct communication, and the ease of access to shops, restaurants, and hotels. MOWA is working with various downtown businesses to build partnerships that will maximize their exposure. For example, the Hampton Inn & Suites has offered a special Art & Chalk Fest event discount on rooms in exchange for promotion on the event website and social media. Other types of partnerships include food donations from local restaurants, in-kind media trades for maximum event exposure, and personalized sponsorship opportunities for businesses to present their brand.

The remaining $5,000 from the Tourism Commission will be put into its account for future tourism promotion opportunities.

Skinny Vic’s to relocate to West Bend

A change in hours for Skinny Vic’s Diner & Coffee Shop, 335 E. Washington Street, in Slinger.

Restaurant owner Vicki Lehnerz said starting June 2, Skinny Vic’s will be open Saturdays and Sundays only, through June 24.

After that date, the Slinger location will close permanently.

Lehnerz would like to thank her valued customers and employees and hopes to see you soon.

Lehnerz is planning to reopen in a new location in West Bend this fall. Keep watching WashingtonCountyInsider.com for future updates.

Carson Pizzino dubbed Deputy Mayor for a day

It was hard to tell who was beaming more Monday afternoon as Tony Pizzino watched his 7-year-old son Carson walk across the hardwood gym floor at McLane School to be officially named ‘Deputy Mayor for the Day’ in the City of West Bend.

The first grader was dressed in a new blue shirt and striped tie. He walked with confidence and offered an impressive handshake to Mayor Kraig Sadownikow who then presented him with a city ID badge and read a proclamation.

“I Mayor Kraig Sadownikow do hereby declare Carson Pizzino to be Deputy Mayor for the Day and this certificate is presented to him on June 4, 2018,” he said.

Neighbors are going to see Carson in action on July 20 when he introduces the Movie in the Park at Regner Park.

Carson’s dad bid on the Deputy Mayor honor during an ice cream social fundraiser.

Teacher Pam Esselman said Carson was such a great choice. “He is very proud to be in charge of things but he’s very caring and compassionate and he really cares about what other people think,” she said.

Carson did tell Mrs. Esselman he thought people would like “not to have homework for a night.”

“His dad does a great job with him,” said Mrs. Esselman. “Carson looks up to his dad so much.”

On a side note: During a video shoot Sunday night at the Pizzino home in West Bend, Carson showed off his wrestling trophies and we talked a bit about the Brewers and Packers.  I asked if he could have an All-Star come to his school for a day… who would it be. After a bit of contemplation he said, “My dad.”

Local Korean War Vets attend Wisconsin Korean War Memorial

Five Korean War Veterans from Washington County traveled on Sunday, June 3 to Plover, WI for the annual ceremony at the Wisconsin Korean War Memorial.

Local veterans in attendance included Norbie Carter, Wally Kohler, Nick Habesetzer, Carl Becker, and Merlin Stockhausen.

Guest speakers included Representative of the Korean Government—Consul Byung-kyoo Ha and Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Daniel Zimmerman.

Consul Byung-kyoo expressed his government’s appreciation and gratitude for our veterans, especially the 801 Wisconsin soldiers killed in action, including Washington County’s Corporal Richard Bell.

The Consul reminded those in attendance that there has never been a treaty or “end of war” declaration ever made.

Byung-Kyoo reported that with the U.S.A. as their partner they are the 11th largest economy in the world.

Secretary Zimmerman emphasized that as descendants of these brave men and women we should always honor and never forget the sacrifices made during this 38 month long war, normally referred to as a conflict.

Zimmerman said the U.S. is still sending troops to Korea which is still officially at war with a ceasefire signed statement.

Both the Consul and Secretary expressed hopes that we, the U.S.A. and Korea can come to an agreement with North Korea so the war can come to an official end and all Koreans will be free.

In 1990 the Village of Plover offered a 2.5 acre island in Lake Pacawac to be used for the Wisconsin Korean War Memorial.

In 1993 a sand berm connected the north shoreline to the island memorial site and the first ceremony was held later that year.  With help of the fund raising and funding from the State of Wisconsin a full-sized bronze statuary, flag poles and 75,000 pound granite wall had been erected.

Each year, an annual “Homecoming” program has been held at the memorial complex.

Updates & tidbits

– Ever Green Restaurant, 1528 E Sumner Street, in Hartford has reopened. The popular Chinese buffet closed, unannounced, in April. This week the restaurant reopened. Management said there was a family issue with a need to return to China.

-Funeral Saturday, June 9 for Sylvarius (Sam) R. Claas, 79, of West Bend. Claas completed his life on Monday, 4 June, 2018. Sam was a talented musician who sang for weddings and played guitar in the Tony Berres Orchestra. For many years, he was St. Mary School’s most passionate advocate. During his tenure at St. Mary’s, he served as 6th-grade teacher, 8th-grade teacher, principal, basketball coach, guitar teacher, custodian, music teacher, youth choir director, and bat wrangler. More than anything, Sam loved to do things with and for his family. Out of pieces of hardboard and parts from an old swimming pool, he crafted a seat so Lynda could ride behind him on his bicycle. A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 12:00 noon, Saturday, June 9 at St. Mary Immaculate Conception (1610 Monroe St., West Bend) with Father Nathan Reesman presiding.

– Common Sense Citizens of Washington County will host both candidates running for Washington County Sheriff on Wednesday, June 13. Jason Guslick and Martin Schulteis will introduce themselves and field questions from the audience. Both candidates will be asked to address the same question in an alternating format. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. at the West Bend Moose Lodge and is open to the public.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

– West Bend City Clerk Stephanie Justmann swore in Officers Florencio Garcia and Trevor Heinecke to the West Bend Police Department this week. Also sworn in was Firefighter/Paramedic Luke VanNatta.

– The US Cellular outlet in West Bend will be celebrating its expansion with a ribbon cutting Wednesday, June 13 at 11:30 a.m. The store, 2025 W. Washington Street, has been undergoing a major interior remodel the last few months. Stop in and check out the new look and enjoy refreshments and in-store gifts and specials.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Reptiles and rats pulled out of home in West Bend

Neighbors in the area of Indiana Avenue and Linwood Terrace in West Bend watched as police hauled snakes, rats, and mice out of a home on Friday afternoon. ‘Terry the tipster’ sent photos of officers and employees from the city Building Inspector’s office carrying clear plastic totes out of a home. Neighbors said they could see reptiles and mice in the containers.

Neighbors said authorities started arriving at the side-by-side duplex around 4:30 p.m. Some said officers wore masks over their faces because of the stench. The plastic containers were reportedly loaded into the police community service vehicle. West Bend Police issued a statement below.

Animal Complaint and Building Code Violations

On May 31 the West Bend and East Troy Police Departments investigated a false imprisonment and sexual assault that occurred in both jurisdictions. During the investigation West Bend Officers located and arrested the 42-year-old male actor at 230 S. Indiana Avenue. That man is presently in the Walworth County Jail.

While officers were at the residence they noticed a foul odor coming from the basement. The officers investigated and found numerous snakes, mice, and other small reptiles in the basement.

On Friday, June 1, 2018 West Bend Police Officers, along with employees from West Bend Public Works, Building Inspection, Building Maintenance, the Milwaukee County Zoo and wardens from the Wisconsin DNR served an inspection warrant at the residence.

Workers removed 160 snakes ranging from 6 inches to 2 feet in length, in excess of 250 mice, several Dart Frogs and Gecko’s from the residence.

Several of the animals were in poor health, and several dead snakes and mice were also removed.

Building Inspectors notes several health and safety code violations. This investigation is continuing. The suspect will be charged with additional criminal and civil code violations.

The West Bend Police Department thanks all the employees from all the other departments and agencies involved in this investigation. Neighbors said police were on scene for several hours.

Nearly 100,000 bees in roof at Kettle Moraine Playhouse in Slinger

A bit of a dicey situation at Kettle Moraine Playhouse in Slinger as 100,000 honeybees have made their home inside the back wall of the theatre.

“It’s still rather cool for them inside the wall so there’s not much activity, but they’re in there,” said Playhouse Board member Ray VonGunten.

Hailed as the IT Director for the Kettle Moraine Playhouse, VonGunten has also donned another hat. “I’ve just been dubbed the man in charge of getting rid of the bees,” he said.

VonGunten walks behind the former St. Paul’s Church, 204 S. Kettle Moraine Drive, and points to a small, quarter-size hole at the roofline of the brick building. It’s about 25-feet to the roof and as we stare at the little black hole, one wonders what the buzz is all about. Someone who can easily confirm the bees are there are the contractors and project managers from Keller Inc.; that’s the locally-owned company that did a majority of work on the remodel.

A neighbor to the north of the Playhouse is also a bee expert and loaned his protective beekeeping gear, including a vented suit, gloves and mesh hat, to the project manager from Keller Inc. when he was working on the chimney.

A remodel of the old church was underway in 2017. The Playhouse staff found the bees but didn’t want to spend the money at the time to have them removed so the project manager at Keller Inc. and the HVAC sub contractor put on the bee suit to install a special vent so the bees wouldn’t get into the building.

Now that the theatre is open for business, the board has determined it’s time to deal with the bees.

“Harvesting the bees won’t be a big expense,” VonGunten said. “Where we’re really going to get hit is the cost to repair the roofline and the fascia.”

This isn’t the first time to try to rid the building of its mammoth beehive. Prior to the Playhouse purchasing the building someone was hired to poison the bees.

“The fella had been contracted to try to kill off the colony and because of that the honey will not be salvageable,” said VonGunten.  “During this effort we’re going to make sure that’s taken out of there as well.”

A special, smooth hose will be used to vacuum out the bees from between the walls. “The hive and honey will also be cleaned out and then the bees will be placed in a temporary location before they’re moved to a permanent colony,” VonGunten said.

While it’s not possible to hear the hum of the hive, either inside or outside the building, neighbor Janine Lisser said she’s seen them in mass. “I’ve lived here almost 18 years and I’ve had a couple of experiences with the bees,” she said. “At least half of the colony left the building and swarmed a bush in our backyard.”

Lisser describes the size of the swarm by holding her arms in a huge circle as if she’s trying to wrap her arms around a giant redwood.

“They’ve never really been a nuisance but there are times when they’re very active and you just have to be respectful,” she said.

The process to remove the bees is expected to happen in mid to late June. In the meantime the Kettle Moraine Playhouse is looking for assistance to help pay for the project.

Hollywood action star Vin Diesel spotted in Hartford                  By Samantha Sali

Folks in Hartford are all a twitter about a celebrity sighting on Main Street today. Carrie Stelzer from Scoop De Ville, 65 N. Main Street, said Vin Diesel, also known as Mark Sinclair, stopped at the ice cream shop around 5:15 p.m. Tuesday afternoon.

Stelzer said the Hollywood actor, producer, director came in with some customers, who she deemed “regulars.”

“We normally see them a couple times a week,” Stelzer said.

“I was working in the back making ice cream and I heard screams and laughter. I didn’t come out because it didn’t sound like anything bad but then somebody told me Vin Diesel was in the store,” she said.

Employees at Scoop De Ville took photos. Several pictures on social media show the bald-headed, muscle-bound actor wearing a white t-shirt and white pants. Stelzer said she was told Diesel was in town visiting family. Stelzer also said Diesel may have stopped at Puebla’s Kitchen down the street.

“It’s good news,” said Stelzer. “Everybody’s talking about it and it’s kind of exciting.”

Shop owner Ray Stelzer said the experience was quite nice. “It’s just a very nice experience to have somebody like that in here,” he said.

Asked whether there have been other celebrities spotted at Scoop De Ville, Stelzer said Harford’s mayor and City Administrator Steve Volkert.

A nudge of a reminder, Stelzer confirmed John McGivern had also visited the store and so did the hosts of Discover Wisconsin.

Employees told Bob Fish has been sold

The employees at Bob Fish Buick GMC in West Bend have already been told, although management is refusing to confirm the sale of the family-owned dealership on S. Main Street.

Early word is Lynch Buick GMC out of Burlington has an offer on the table and is in talks to close on the purchase of the business and the building, 2275 S. Main Street in West Bend.

More details on the sale are expected to be available at the end of June.

Management at Lynch GMC in Burlington said they had “no comment at this time.” However they confirmed they would pass along a statement when the time was right.

Bob Fish founded the dealership in June 1981. He started as Bob Fish Pontiac, Cadillac and GMC Truck; which later became Bob Fish Pontiac, Buick, GMC and Isuzu Truck and Bob Fish Truck and Equipment in West Bend.

According to his obituary, June 20, 2008,

Bob was known as a tremendous talented businessman who took time to teach and share his knowledge with not only his employees but anyone who was in need of his talents. His passion was to build and manufacture commercial trucks of all sizes. He was an originating board member of the national commercial dealer council where he served his fellow dealers and General Motors in the advancement of the commercial truck business for the last three years. Bob was also involved with the Wisconsin Automobile and Truck Dealers association and the Automobile Dealers of Metro Milwaukee. Bob was a very compassionate person who cared about the community and showed his compassion for children by his generous gifts to the MACC Fund, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Washington County, the Washington County Fair Park and numerous other organizations. Bob’s avocation was his everlasting fondness for racing. Bob helped start and create careers in short track racing. Most notably was his involvement with Slinger Speedway and the Milwaukee Mile. Bob was a tremendous outdoorsman who loved to pheasant and duck hunt; he also enjoyed fishing, golfing, and boating. Bob enjoyed traveling and easily made friends where ever he traveled. Bob touched the lives of many; and his kindness was never ending during people’s time of need. Bob was a proud member of the West Bend Moose Lodge 1398, West Bend VFW Post # 1393, the Vietnam Veterans of America in Newburg, the West Bend Area Chamber of Commerce and numerous other organizations.

Bob Fish died at the age of 59.

New West Bend School Superintendent confirms salary   

Media in Rapid City, South Dakota posted the salary of incoming West Bend Superintendent Don Kirkegaard. Earlier this week the West Bend School District announced the hiring of Kirkegaard, 59.

An open records request was submitted for contract details including salary, benefits, vacation and perks. Calls were also place to School Board President Joel Ongert. So far, no calls have been returned and no information received.

On May 30, 2018 Rapidcityjournal.com posted an article about Kirkegaard by correspondent Bob Mercer. The article talks about how Kirkegaard has ended his stay “as South Dakota’s top K-12 official five months after he began.”

“This was a very difficult decision. I have been in South Dakota my entire career and have worked with so many great teachers, students, parents and administrators,” he said.

Kirkegaard praised the state department’s “great team” and said he was “extremely grateful” to the governor for the opportunity as secretary. When his state appointment was announced, Kirkegaard said he understood the position was for one year and it was uncertain whether the next governor would retain him.

So, he began looking for another job.

“I receive announcements from several different recruiting firms and the West Bend position seemed like it was a great fit for me and hopefully for the West Bend School District,” Kirkegaard said.

He wanted a district with 6,000 to 10,000 students in “an exciting and thriving community” where his skills met the local needs. He described West Bend, which is near Milwaukee, as “a great fit.”

“I took the position of secretary of education knowing that it was a short-term position,” Kirkegaard said. “We have three excellent candidates for governor. I have had no discussion with any of the candidates discussing my future within the department. I am not certain if I would have been asked to stay on or not.”

His hope, he said, was to work another five to 10 years in education and knew from experience there wouldn’t be many opportunities in December through July.

He said his wife, Lois, is excited about moving closer to their children who live in Minneapolis and Fargo.

“A new district and new state will be an exciting change. Not better or worse, just different,” he said.

In December 2017 the West Bend School District voted to release Superintendent Erik Olson.

Olson was hired June 2016 and officially resigned effective Dec. 14, 2017. When hired the School Board approved a two-year contract with Olson at a salary of $155,000. In 2017 that contract was extended another two years. Below is the resignation agreement between the West Bend Board of Education and Erik Olson.

Olson’s salary upon termination was $155,000 a year. The amount of benefits received in the agreement were not disclosed and are part of a second open records request.

The agreement also indicates Olson would receive full salary “less applicable withholdings” for the remainder of his contract. He will also receive moving expenses of $10,000 and unused vacation of $10,432.63.

In the top story at Rapidcityjournal.com where “Kirkegaard explains why his time was so short as education secretary” he also spoke about his salary.

The article reads: “As education secretary he was paid $155,000.  The salary in West Bend will be $175,000, he said.”

There is some analysis in the blog “Dakota Free Press” by Cory Allen Heidelberger about the departure of Kirkegaard from South Dakota. One of the comments following the post had some speculation about the political future in Wisconsin.

The comment was posted by Donald Pay: Let’s make some assumptions, though, about the future. Let’s say Tony Evers wins the Democratic Party nomination for Governor and goes on to beat Scott Walker. Evers currently is the Secretary of the Department of Public Instruction, an elected head of what in South Dakota is the appointed Secretary of Education. That office would be open, and, though technically a non-partisan office, the candidates usually line up ideologically with one of the parties. The more conservative side of the aisle has had little luck fielding good, electable candidates for that office over a couple decades. So, maybe, Kierkegaard could, if not next year, then sometime in the future, be a candidate for that office.

It is likely, even if Evers doesn’t beat Walker, that this will be his last term in that office, so it will be an open seat anyway. Kirkegaard is scheduled to start in West Bend on July 1, 2018.

New salon opening in West Bend

Rhiannon Klotz and Revive Salon are on the move. Klotz and her husband recently purchased 325 Chestnut Street in West Bend. The interior of the old fire extinguisher store/Habitat ReStore/Bargain Mart has been gutted to the studs and is undergoing a severe makeover.

“I took cues from my former landlord Mike Smith who said ‘always own your own building,’” said Klotz. “This building screams my name. This is my style.” The remodel is expected to run through summer. “This is 4,000-square-feet of amazingness,” Klotz said.

The new Revive Salon will feature six open-concept stations, a coffee station, a blow-and-dry bar, makeup station and three private rooms for rent. “We’re looking at renting it out for nails or an esthetician,” said Klotz. “We’ll have a break room and totally hip waiting area with big glass doors.”

Klotz is hoping to open in September after Labor Day weekend. Not only did the Klotzs buy the building but also the empty lot to the south for parking. During the remodel Revive Salon will continue to operate out of its current location, 1747 Barton Avenue.

“That 1,200 square feet will be available October 1 so anyone interested can call or text me at 262-305-7382,” said Klotz.

Updates & tidbits

-Veterans from Washington County participating in the June 2 Stars & Stripes Honor Flight include:  Herman Ross Sr., Vietnam War Navy, of Hubertus, Ralph “Buzz” Schlass, Vietnam War Army, of Jackson, and Melvin Schultz, Korean War Air Force, of Slinger.

– The parking lot on the south end of Main Street looked like a firefighter convention Tuesday evening. That’s because Firehouse Subs hosted a VIP night and local firefighters were the guests of honor. Sharon and Bob Erickson, owners of the local Firehouse Subs franchise, were putting their employees through their paces and thanking local firefighters with a hot meal on the house. Firehouse Subs, 1733 S. Main Street, is open for business in West Bend.

– Rally Time Sports Bar and Grill in West Bend is looking for a part-time line cook position. Rally Time has a family-friendly team atmosphere. The position is primarily day shift and coverage as needed. Call Dan at 262-389-1142 or Cindy at 262-389-0839 or stop at the bar for an application.

– Hartford Union High School senior Abbie Groppe signed on to play tennis this fall for Edgewood College in Madison.

– Jake’s Free Fishing Day is Saturday, June 2 in Kewaskum at River Hill Park.  The program gets underway at 9 a.m. – noon. The event is sponsored by the Gateway Gobblers of the Nation Wild Turkey Federation.

– Robert P. Wagner, 81, of West Bend died on Wednesday, May 30, 2018. For many years, he worked at the former White House Milk Company. After their closing, he worked at the Gehl Company and later Kenro, Inc. in Fredonia. He enjoyed playing sheepshead and house painting.  One of his projects was painting the peaks at the Old Washington County Courthouse. Funeral services will be held on Monday, June 4, at 1:30 p.m. at the Schmidt Funeral Home in West Bend with Deacon Mark Jansen officiating.

– Maurice G. Bobholz, 87, passed away Sunday May 27, 2018. Maurice enlisted in the US Navy in March of 1949, and served 1 year active duty, and was in the reserves for an additional 14 years. Maurice was employed at GEHL Company for almost 40 years- first as a machinist, then later as a foreman and inspector. He also was employed part time as a deputy with the Washington County Sheriff’s Department for 25+ years.  A Funeral Service for Maurice will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday June 6 at Good Shepherd Ev. Lutheran Church (777 S. Indiana Ave. West Bend) with Pastor Robert Hein presiding

Celebrating 50th anniversary at Samaritan Campus

A celebration today of the 50th anniversary of the Samaritan Campus in West Bend.

Guest speakers included Washington County Administrator Joshua Schoemann.

“One of county’s key priorities is having different programs that provide access to basic needs for our residents and I can’t think of a better organization that does just that,” he said. “The work they do is extremely important and we’re appreciative of it.”

Schoemann stressed the great compassion the employees have for the residents at the Samaritan.

Washington County Board Chairman Donald A. Kriefall then read a proclamation that saluted the 131 residents at the Samaritan Health Center and the 50 year anniversary of the campus.

Cycling Without Age and Bike Friendly West Bend were praised for encouraging a partnership and healthy climate with senior citizens in the community.

The day’s celebration was highlighted by the opening of a time capsule that was tucked away May 14, 1993.

The 25-year-old time capsule was kept in the storeroom at the Samaritan. Mary Thiemer said it was intentional “because the one we buried before under the flag pole leaked and ruined all the contents.”

Once opened the time capsule revealed stories from the past included an active employment list from the Samaritan Health Center, a four-generation photo, a letter from May 14, 1993 about licensed social workers, 29 cents was taped to an orange piece of paper indicating how much a stamp cost in 1993. There was also a gift certificate for the beauty shop from Mary Ellen Sadownikow.

Another special moment at the celebration included rickshaw rides for folks at the Samaritan.

Gerry Kasik, 80, was treated to a spin around the parking lot. “Ohhhh this was great,” she said. “I like this weather.”

Kasik grew up in Milwaukee and remembered bicycling with her friends. “We all went together. There were about 30 kids on our block and we all took our bikes and went to the pool,” she said. “My bike was blue; nothing fancy but a nice big two wheeler.”

Carrie Jeffords was one of the bike pilots. She said all her customers really loved the ride.

“One woman said the only time she gets out is to go to the doctor and she really appreciated the ride,” said Jeffords. “They all said it was too short and they wanted to stay out longer.”

On a personal note: This summer’s Amazing Ride for Alzheimer’s will be raising funds for a second rickshaw for the Samaritan Health Center. Our goal is $10,000 and we will be selling bicycle license plates. Businesses and neighbors can sponsor a plate with their name or company logo. While on the tour my niece Audrey and I will send you a post card from the road and after the tour is over we’ll autograph the license plate and give it back to you as a memento from the adventure.

Checks can be made to “Samaritan Campus” and mailed to 531 E. Washington Street, West Bend, WI 53095. All donations are tax deductible. Be sure to mark the FEIN number on your check 396005754. 100-percent of the money raised will be donated to Samaritan Campus.  This year’s tour will take us to Whitefish Point, Michigan and the Shipwreck Museum. The 3-week tour leaves June 30.

Special ceremony Sunday, May 27 for Korean War vet Merlin Heinecke

Military Honors were held Sunday, May 27 to mark the grave of Army Veteran Merlin Heinecke of Allenton who was MIA in Korea on Dec. 2, 1950. Heinecke was in the battle of Chosin Reservoir. Merlin was born in Allenton on Aug. 7, 1929. He was baptized at Zion Ev. Lutheran Church on Sept. 1, 1929.

One of 12 adult children, Merlin had six sisters and five brothers at the time of his death. Merlin joined the U.S. Army on Jan. 6, 1949 at the age of 20. A short five months later Merlin was on his way overseas. He was assigned to the Heavy Motor Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. On Dec. 5, 1950, during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir, SFC Merlin Heinecke went missing. He was declared dead on Dec. 31, 1953. His remains have not been recovered.

A memorial service was held for him at Zion sometime between Dec. 31, 1953 and early 1954. On Sunday, May 27, 2018 as part of the Memorial Day observation Merlin’s service and ultimate sacrifice was marked with the placement of a monument stone in the cemetery with bronze military plaque. The stone was funded by members of the Heinecke family, Lutheran Military Support Group and Zion Ev. Lutheran Church.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

New grandstand and upgrade at Carl Kuss Field in West Bend

The West Bend Common Council emerged from closed session Monday to confirm a plan is in place to provide funds in a matching grant for improvements to Carl M. Kuss Field at Regner Park.

The deal includes a healthy grant from the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation.

“The schools district went out to get a $500,000 grant from the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation and that’s a game changer for the project,” said West Bend Mayor Kraig Sadownikow.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) approved by the Common Council will be official once the other organizations approve it.  According to Sadownikow, the decision was “easy” from a financial perspective.

“What it entails is $100,000 in cash from the city and there will be at least $75,000 in work we can do with demolition to the existing field and knocking down the grandstand,” said Sadownikow. “We spend somewhere between $60,000 and $75,000 a year to maintain the field so by eliminating that we’re paying for our investment in two to three years.”

Sadownikow praised the West Bend Baseball Association for donating “tons of time and energy” with money and scoreboards and field work. “I’ve been involved in five years of discussion, but getting the $500,000 grant is very important and what the MOU recognizes is $175,000 from the City of West Bend, $100,000 from the West Bend School District and $35,000 directly from the WBBA.”

The remaining balance of the first $500,000 will be privately raised.

There are a number of local supporters of the project including Prudence Pick Hway whose family’s ties to baseball and Carl M. Kuss Field go back to when the grandstand was first located at the Washington County Fairgrounds.

“My grandfather Carl Pick was a big supporter of baseball and he paid to have the grandstand moved, disassembled and reassembled from the Fairgrounds to where it is today at Regner Park,” Hway said.

“This is a tremendous project. Baseball in this community has a rich history, it has all the fun of the boys of summer and it’s very important to many, many contingents in the public.”

The timing of the project is critical for West Bend. In March 2018 the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association announced summer baseball in the state of Wisconsin was officially dead. In 2019 all high school teams will move to spring ball.

Willie Mueller, President of the WBBA, said the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation was the big key to getting the project over the hump.

“The Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation only does little league diamonds but when we approached them on this they looked at the history and the grandstand and what the project is going to look like when it’s done and they wanted in,” Mueller said.

The project, according to Mueller, is similar to when Rick Riehl hired Mueller and Doug Gonring to coach at Concordia University in Mequon. “The facilities there were terrible for Division 3 baseball,” Mueller said.

“Then Kapco came in with Robin Yount and Bob Uecker and we upgraded that field to a $3.2 million state-of-the-art facility and people came in hand over foot to play.”

Mueller acknowledged the same thing is happening in West Bend.  “This is a huge deal for us,” he said. “There will be artificial turf and we will be talking about naming rights and there are a lot of people in the community getting behind this for the high school kids. It’s really a great deal.”

Fundraising for the remaining balance is in the works. Those details should be released in the coming weeks.

West Bend Park and Rec Director Craig Hoeppner said he hoped the work on the field, should all the remaining financial factors fall in place, could begin as early as August.

“If this project can be fast tracked the work could start as early as late summer or early fall,” he said. “The high school season goes through July and the Land O’ Lakes teams will play until August but knowing we’ve been waiting for this for the last 30 years… we could go as early as August or sometime within the next 18 months.”

Hoeppner said while there is a historic component to the grandstand that would be the first thing to go. “The grandstand dates to 1898 and then in 1937 it was moved to Regner and it’s not that there are safety concerns… it’s just well past its useful life,” he said.

It was January 2016 when the West Bend Baseball Association talked about fundraising $500,000 to improve the baseball stadium at Regner Park.

Craig Larsen with the WBBA said the new facility “would have better seating, be ADA equipped, and have a high-end press box.”

“Hopefully 2016 marks the year that the needed work can begin to make an already beautiful park, a place that can stand another 75 years,” he said.

The Memorandum of Understanding, dated May 1, 2018, is between the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, the City of West Bend and the West Bend Public School District.

The partnership between the organizations details construction of a synthetic turf high school baseball field.

Laura Jackson, Assistant Superintendent of Teaching and Learning in the West Bend School District, submitted the note below. “I just wanted you, our staff, and our community to know that the district received a copy of the MOU last night.  We have made no commitment and have had no discussion of this topic.”

Look at the history of the grandstand at Carl Kuss Field

The 2018 Washington County Fair is still a couple months away but let’s take a brief trip back in time and run a history check on the first fairgrounds and an interesting part of local history featuring the old wooden grandstand.

The original County Fairgrounds were in West Bend near Wilson Avenue and North Street from 1858 – 1937; where Fair Park School is currently located.

A photo from the History Center of Washington County provides a unique look at the grandstand as it overlooked the dirt racetrack. There were actually two grandstands at the County Fair. The other, according to an article by Jack Anderson, “provided seating for the fair’s baseball diamond.”

Believe it or not, it was the grandstand that helped draw attractions and added attendance to the County Fair, but that facility also added the most financial burden as well.

Some of the programs at the grandstand, according to archives at the History Center of Washington County, included surrey races, auto racing, an afternoon livestock parade, “plowing contests with both horses and oxen.”

Another photo from circa 1910 courtesy You Know You are From West Bend, shows the two grandstands and the surrey racing on the track.

It’s interesting to note the tidbit from the West Bend Democrat in 1898. The brief cited the attendance and the ‘long needed grandstand’ but also noted “A number of farmers …. were fleeced of their cash.. as a gang of pickpockets plied their trade.”

The fairgrounds fell into foreclosure in 1937.  An article in the WBBA program from 2012 noted the grandstand was “disassembled and used to build the smaller, 108.9 foot by 26.1 foot grandstand at Carl M. Kuss Memorial Baseball Field.”

Etiquette for Memorial Day Parade

Neighbors across Washington County are being asked to stand and remove their hats when the U.S. flag passes at the start of Memorial Day parades on Monday, May 28. The day, also called Decoration Day, is for observance in memory of dead members of the armed forces of all wars. Today’s 1924 history photo is of an American Legion parade. West Bend’s Memorial Day Parade steps off at 9:30 a.m. from Main and Oak Street.

Planting underway as MOWA Cultural Campus takes shape

It’s as if a mini nursery set up shop in the driveway of the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend, that’s as 700 Quaking Aspen trees are prepped for planting.

Dwain Bartel is crew leader with David J. Frank Landscape in Germantown.

“The trees weigh up to 300 pounds and we’ll be planting them along the walkway and the north side of the building,” said Bartel. “This is going to take us quite a few months to plant all of them.”

Bartel said the trees came in from Oregon and other places around the state.

“The color of the leaf is yellow and those will shimmer in the wind, especially in the fall,” he said.

The current grove of trees line the south end of the parking lot. The root balls are covered in woodchips to help retain the moisture.

There are two acres of vacant land just south of MOWA on Veterans Avenue. Plans are to add mature trees and flower beds and have a paved walkway that flows gracefully from the bridges over the Milwaukee River through the park and to the museum or the Eisenbahn State Trail.

Some of the plants on Veterans Avenue and Water Street include white oak, flowering pear, sugar maple (the state tree), hydrangea beds and an Aspen grove.

The stellar moment will be at the point of the building would be a field of white hydrangea with a line of Quaking Aspen trees.

The field would bloom July 1 to September. MOWA will be the care taker of the cultural campus.

Dollar General bomb-threat scam

Early Tuesday afternoon a report was posted about bomb threats being called in to Dollar General stores in Campbellsport, West Bend and in Fond du Lac and Dodge County.

West Bend Police just posted an update: WEST BEND POLICE MEDIA BRIEF BOMB SCARE Dollar General – 1120 E Washington St

On May 22, 2018 at 10:37AM, the Dollar General Store received a threat by telephone in which the caller stated that there was a bomb in the store and demanded money be transferred via prepaid credit cards. Dollar General Store management recognized this as a scam and called West Bend Police. No suspicious devices or objects were found. No one was injured. This is a scam known to law enforcement throughout the country.

Similar incidents were reported today around the same time at Dollar General Stores in Waupaca and Campbellsport. West Bend Police Investigators are working with law enforcement from the Fond Du Lac County Sheriff Department and Waupaca Police Department to identify the source of these calls.

If any area business receives a similar call they should immediately notify law enforcement.

In Campbellsport, Police Chief Tom Dornbrook said his department took action immediately when the Dollar General on Grandview Avenue received a call at 11:46 a.m. “The person calling the store said there ‘was a bomb in the store and don’t call police,’” said Dornbrook. “When that statement was made the employee set the phone down, cleared out the store and called us.”

Campbellsport Police responded along with six deputies and a sergeant from Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department.

Text by Campbellsport School District

Dornbrook said schools in the community including Campbellsport Elementary, the high school, middle school and St. Matthew’s went on lockdown and the Kid’s Clubhouse Child Care Center was evacuated.

During the investigation authorities discovered the same store in West Bend, Beaver Dam and Waupaca all received similar calls. “The only difference was their employees all stayed on the line and it turns out this is a scam because they told the other stores to fill out pre-paid VISA cards,” Dornbrook said.

“Even though this is most likely a hoax it was a good test of our response system and we’re really happy with that. The people I feel the worst for is the firemen and EMS who gave up their day jobs and will lose time on their paycheck,” he said.

Campbellsport Fire Department, EMS, Eden Fire Department, and Fond du Lac Sheriff’s all responded.

Special ceremony Sunday, May 27 for Korean War vet Merlin Heinecke

As part of the Sunday, May 27 memorial service on the cemetery of Zion Ev Lutheran Chuch,  6430 County Road D, Allenton, the service and sacrifice of Merlin A. Heinecke, MIA in Korea on December 2, 1950, will be acknowledged with the placement of a cemetery monument with VA bronze marker and a flag presentation in his honor.

No marker was ever placed in the cemetery at the time the military declared him dead. Korean-era veterans from Washington County went to South Korea to visit the UN Korean memorial, on which his name is also placed.

Cemetery service, honor guard and flag presentation will take place after Zion’s regular Sunday service, which ends at 10 a.m. This will be a very brief service, as the honor guard is scheduled at other churches, as well.  There will be a short reception after the service, for which some displays are being set up in the church fellowship hall.  Refreshments will also be served.

Local Girl Scouts recognized with Silver Award                       By Ana Murray

On May 18, 2018, Keriana Murray, 14, of Jackson, Brynn Bauer, 14, and Madeline Toney, 14, of West Bend were recognized at the Area 240 ceremony for achieving their Girl Scout Silver Award.

Each girl had to give 50 hours to develop a sustainable program that would impact their community. After hours of planning, preparation, soliciting and collecting donations and then using their cookie-sale proceeds to buy materials they were able to complete their project of bringing educational materials and games into the hands of home bound and mentally disabled adults and family centers servicing families in need.

DACO announces entirely employee owned

DACO Precision-Tool, 8565 US-45, in Kewaskum is preparing to announce the company is now 100% employee owned. “We will be putting up two new signs on our building next week and celebrating our 100% employee ownership,” said DACO General Manager Austin Weber.

DACO was founded in 1984 by two 50/50 partners Randy Weber and Lloyd Kanzenbach who decided to transition the company to employee owned.

The sign install is scheduled for Tuesday, May 29 or Wednesday, May 30. Signworks in Hartford helped with the layout and install.

Updates & tidbits

-In October 2017 it was first announced on WashingtonCountyInsider.com that a new Firehouse Subs was coming to West Bend. The build out at 1733 S. Main Street is nearly complete and the new restaurant owned by Sharon and Bob Erickson will open May 30.

-The FREE Adult Swim Lesson week is coming up at the Kettle Moraine YMCA. Whether you are a seasoned swimmer or just starting out, there is a class for everyone. If you haven’t had a chance to register for any classes yet, there is still time.

-Signs for the new Don Ramon Mexican Restaurant popped up over the weekend at 501 Wildwood Road in West Bend. The former Mother’s Day/ Dairy Queen location will soon be home to the restaurant owned by Felix Sanchez. It was last month when WashingtonCountyInsider.com broke the story about the Mexican restaurant from Mayville opening its section location in West Bend. Don Ramon has a large menu. “We’re authentic Mexican, tacos are our specialty and we marinate and cut our own meat,” said Sanchez.

– Saint Gabriel Parish celebrated the culmination of its $5 million campaign with a groundbreaking Sunday morning for the new education center. The church, located on Highway 164 in Hubertus, titled its campaign ‘Many parts one body.’ The education center will be attached to the church allowing the two facilities to be on the same grounds as in the past. The center is scheduled to open in January 2019 in time for the second semester of Saint Gabriel School.

-Veterans from Washington County participating in the June 2 Stars & Stripes Honor Flight include:  Herman Ross Sr., Vietnam War Navy, of Hubertus, Ralph “Buzz” Schlass, Vietnam War Army, of Jackson, and Melvin Schultz, Korean War Air Force, of Slinger.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Sale price listed for Morrie’s Honda purchase

The sale price has come in for the 39.575-acre parcel on the southwest corner of Highway 33 and Scenic Drive in West Bend. The property belonged to the Devenport family. It was annexed into the city in February and recently sold to Morries West Bend H RE, LLC.

According to records in the City Assessor’s office the parcel sold for $3,396,300.

The property is currently owned by Devenport Family Limited Partnership #1.

According to Washington County the parcel was purchased in 1988 by Douglas Devenport.

In 1996 it was transferred to Craig Devenport and the Devenport Family Limited Partnership #1.

The 2017 assessment is for two parcels. One is 37.2 acres and its assessed value is $217,700. The second, much smaller parcel closer to the Highway is about a 3-acre strip valued at $7,700.

Coming up this summer construction will get underway for a new Morrie’s West Bend Honda dealership.

The project will consist of a new two-story structure approximately 35,000 square foot footprint that will contain office, retail showroom, architectural display elements, and service facilities.

Morrie’s new Honda facility will create approximately 60 new jobs in the community.

Former Washington Co. Board Supervisor has died

Thomas J. Sackett “Tom,” 79, of Hartford, Wisconsin was called home to heaven on May 17, 2018. Sackett was very involved in his community where he served as an alderman in his younger years and in his retirement as the Chairman of the Board of Washington County. Mass of Resurrection for Tom will be celebrated Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. at St. Kilian Catholic Church (264 W. State Street Hartford, WI 53027) with Fr. David LaPlante officiating. Family will greet relatives and friends at church on Thursday from 1:00-3:30p.m. Tom’s wish was to be cremated.

Opening day announcements for area restaurants

There are six new restaurants opening in the West Bend area and one establishment that reopened after it was closed for a licensing issue. We’re following up on how development is going and give you an opening date for the new eateries in the community.

Pizza Ranch will officially open Monday, May 21. There is a ribbon cutting Wednesday, May 16 at 10:30 a.m.  The public is invited to attend and Rev. Nate Reesman will offer a blessing.

Across town Eaton’s Pizza, 830 E. Paradise Drive, in West Bend will officially open June 25. It was this past February when WashingtonCountyInsider.com announced Eaton’s Fresh Pizza was returning to West Bend.

Don Ramon is moving into the former Dairy Queen/ Mother’s Day location, 501 Wildwood Road, in West Bend. It was April 24 when the story broke on WashingtonCountyInsider.com that the Mexican restaurant was opening its second location in West Bend.  Owner Felix Sanchez said the restaurant will open in July.

In October 2017 the story was first announced on WashingtonCountyInsider.com that a new Firehouse Subs was coming to West Bend. The build out at 1733 S. Main Street is nearly complete and the new restaurant owned by Sharon and Bob Erickson will open May 30.

In downtown West Bend progress is being made inside the former Sears building, 102 S. Main Street, as Bababebay Luu is working on the new Pearl of Canton Restaurant.  It was January 2017 when WashingtonCountyInsider.com first broke the story about the new Asian/American restaurant. Last week Luu said there was a lot more work to be done to bring the building, electrical and plumbing up to code. She is hoping to open in July … but that’s not definite at this point.

Moonlighting, 326 Commerce Street, in Barton has reopened. The bar/restaurant went through a licensing issue and the state temporarily shut them down April 17. That issue was resolved when the West Bend Common Council approved a new license at its May 7 meeting. Owner Chad Goeman used the downtime to remodel a bit. Step inside and you’ll see a new floor, lighting and most impressive is the 20 tappers for a large beer selection.

In Allenton, Aiden O’Reilly’s is changing hands. Mark Merten and his wife have purchased the establishment at 402 Main Street. Merten is planning on changing the name and making some improvements.

In other restaurant news, the McDonald’s on W. Washington Street in West Bend opened over the weekend. The inside was totally remodeled and updated.  The video above takes you for a walk through.  The McD’s on S. Main Street is also going to be remodeled and the galaxy theme is being replaced.

Huge award for Museum Of Wisconsin Art in West Bend

Some well-deserved recognition for the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend as it has been named ‘Best Gallery Or Museum In Wisconsin’ by American Art Awards.

“This 32,000-square-foot museum houses five permanent collection galleries, three temporary exhibition spaces, classrooms, a large atrium and more. Over 5,000 works of contemporary and historic art by more than 350 artists,” is how American Art Awards describes MOWA.

An article in medium.com by reporter Thom Bierdz read, “The Museum of Wisconsin Art won the distinction of Best Gallery Or Museum In Wisconsin, 2018, and one of American Art Awards 25 Best American Galleries / Museums, 2018.”

Jessica Wildes is director of communications and marketing at MOWA. “We are truly honored to be named one of the top 25 museums in America and the top museum in Wisconsin by the American Art Awards,” said Wildes.  “Our selection was based on our innovative philosophy where everyone’s a member.”

One of the other keys to success, according to Wildes, is MOWA’s ability to wrap its arms around all its guests.

“Instead of repeat admission fees, every visitor becomes a member to the museum for a full year upon their first visit to MOWA,” she said. “Membership includes unlimited gallery viewing, 175+ free-for-member programs, and access to special events and classes for a full year.”

Three Catholic Schools receive Exemplary Recognition from the Archdiocese      By Kristin Bayer

Three area schools in Washington County were recently honored by the Archdiocese of Milwaukee with Exemplary Recognition. Holy Trinity in Kewaskum, Holy Angels in West Bend, and Saint Frances Cabrini in West Bend were among 11 schools from throughout the Archdiocese given this recognition. The Archdiocese covers 10 counties in southeastern Wisconsin.

The three schools were recognized in the area of Catholic Identity and Mission.

Exemplary Recognition is how the Archdiocese recognizes and commends schools that go well beyond normal standards and requirements. Every seven years, Catholic schools go through a re-accreditation process. Schools must meet a wide set of standards, educational and religious, to be accredited. For Exemplary Recognition, schools have an additional application process. They gather evidence, and submit preliminary and final reports. Then a team, including the School Superintendent for the Archdiocesan schools, visits the school, touring the facility, spending time in the classrooms, and meeting and interviewing a broad cross section of stakeholders in the school, including parents, teachers, the principal and staff, the school advisory board, parish priests, and the students themselves.

The reasons for this special recognition are as unique as the schools themselves. Holy Trinity’s mission is to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ, to provide a high quality education, and to guide children in living the Catholic faith. Principal Jodi Casetta says that the school truly lives out this mission. “It’s strong, clear, and concise, and it guides us in all our decision making.” She points out the school’s approach to marketing as an example. “We try not to market at people, but instead to invite them and welcome them. It’s not like business marketing. We’re here. We’re welcoming, and when God calls people here, they come.”

At Holy Angels School, each week begins with a Monday morning assembly that centers a discussion of scripture readings from Sunday and how the students can live out the good news in their lives during the coming week. Principal Mike Sternig said during re-accreditation, the evaluating team noticed the strong faith community and family feeling that permeated the school. “It’s part of everything we do here.” The team recommended the school apply for Exemplary Recognition. This is the third time the school has received Exemplary Recognition from the Archdiocese.

At Saint Frances Cabrini School, Catholic identity begins in the classroom, according to principal Aaron Hilts. “Our priests regularly come to our classrooms to teach about the faith, and to answer questions when students want to dive a little deeper,” he said. Hilts is also proud of the community service projects that are built into classroom curriculum, and of the school-wide service. For example, the school recently honored patron saint Mother Cabrini with a Month of Charity, during which students gathered 200 bags of donations for the Albrecht Free Clinic.

The Archdiocese of Milwaukee has a commitment to excellence and continued school improvement that ensures the best learning possible for its students. The Exemplary Recognition Program, based on the National Standards and Benchmarks for Effective Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools, honors schools that have demonstrated innovation and outstanding results. It is unusual that all the Catholic schools in a local area would apply for or be recognized in the same year. “We are delighted to receive this recognition, and delighted share the honor with our neighbor schools,” said Hilts.

Kettle Moraine YMCA receives bike racks

The Kettle Moraine YMCA in West Bend is the proud owner of a new bicycle rack made by students at Moraine Park Technical College.  There will be five MPTC designed-and-fabricated bike racks installed at the YMCA and about a dozen similar bicycle racks going up around the community. Bike Friendly West Bend help initiate the project with MPTC.

Energizers Dance Team from Hartford earn 3 more championship titles | By Jennifer Jackson Soto

Just one week after earning a champion title at Dance Worlds, the Energizers Dance Team from Hartford earned three more championship titles at the Dance Summit in Orlando.

The Summit, produced by Varsity All Star, is a very prestigious and competitive event for younger dance and cheer teams and non-Worlds dance genres. This was the first time the Energizers competed here and the team was thrilled and honored to earn paid bids for SEVEN routines – Mini Pom, Mini Jazz, Youth Variety, Youth Pom, Youth Jazz, Senior Kick and Senior Variety.

At this year’s Dance Summit, held May 5-6 at the Coronado Springs Resort, over 1,500 athletes, 234 teams, from 10 countries vied for the coveted first place and championship ring that each athlete and coach receives.

This is a two-day event where only the top 50% (or top five) teams advance to Day 2.

After advancing all seven routines on Day 1, the Energizers poured their heart and soul onto the floor again with their high energy, crowd-pleasing performances.

The EDT is extremely proud of their final placements, which were earned against intense competition from teams as far away as Japan:

Senior Kick – ages 12-19 – “Sweet Caroline” – First place

Senior Variety – ages 12-19 – “EDT Family” – First place

Youth Variety – ages 9-12- “Love & Peace” – First place

Youth Pom – ages 9-12 – “Moment” – First place

Youth Jazz – ages 9-12 – “Waka Waka” – Third place

Mini Pom – ages 6-9 – “Janet Jackson” Second place

Mini Jazz – ages 6-9 – “Ridiculous” – Second place

A total of 42 dancers ages 6 – 18 from the Energizers performed at Summit:

Cierra Trost, Mackenzy Lehmann, Tannor Allar, Skylar Allar, Tylie Allar, Emma Konjura, Maddie Pinter, Isabelle Anderson, Peyton Kriehn, Ava Olson, Sydney Martin, Avery Krenz, Carmen Roemke, Alex Soto, Marisa Strankowski, Brooke Becker, Mya Pinter, Brynn Morley, Alexis Landon, Summer Schroeder, Summer Stamm, Chloe Dulski, Hope Dulski, Erica Kohls, Ava Rogers, Lindsey Curtis, Peyton Lemke, Ella Johnson, Kelsey Monfre, Annika Engebretsen, Tatum Boylen, Bailey Hubing, Mallory Hawkins, Allison Hoeft, Delaney Hron, Paige Kaiser, Ella Kuhn, Haylee Landon, Kate Morley, Savannah Resch, Brooklynn Scioli, and Amaiyah Shepard. Congratulations once again to the Energizers Dance Team and coaches Sheila Trost, Jim Trost, Alexis Trost and Kayla Henderson.

Three finalists named for West Bend School superintendent

The School Board in West Bend Joint School District #1 selected three finalists for the position of superintendent for the district. The finalists include Donald Kirkegaard, secretary of education, State of South Dakota, Pierre, South Dakota; Christopher Peterson, superintendent, Howards Grove School District, Howards Grove, Wisconsin; and Thomas Hoh, executive director of secondary education, Green Bay Area Public School District, Green Bay, Wisconsin.

“I am impressed with the overwhelming quality of the 43 candidates who were recruited and applied for our superintendent position,” said School Board President Joel Ongert. “The search firm we hired did a great job, which led to an outstanding group of finalists.”

Donald A. Kirkegaard — Prior to being appointed by the governor of South Dakota as secretary of education for the state in 2017, Kirkegaard was superintendent of the Meade School District and Britton-Hecla School District for nearly 23 years. He was also a principal in the Britton-Hecla School District for six years. Kirkegaard earned a bachelor’s degree in political science and economics from South Dakota State University, a master’s degree in school administration from Northern State University, and an educational specialist degree in school district administration from the University of South Dakota.

Christopher D. Peterson — Christopher Peterson has 23 years of experience in public education, including nine as superintendent of Howards Grove School District. His experience includes serving as principal in the Manitowoc Public School District, Kimberly Area School District, and the School District of Wausaukee, and teaching in the Little Chute Area School District. Peterson earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, a master’s degree in educational administration from Marian University, superintendent certification from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and is working on a doctorate at Marian University.

Thomas J. Hoh, Ph.D. — Thomas Hoh has 20 years of experience in public education and currently serves as the executive director of secondary education for the Green Bay Area Public School District. Prior to joining the Green Bay Area Public School District, Hoh was a principal in the Ripon Area School District and also worked in the Kaukauna Area School District and Neenah Joint School District. Hoh earned his bachelor’s degree in education and master’s degree in educational leadership and policy analysis from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He earned a doctorate in education leadership from Marian University.

The board and district employees will interview each of the finalists a second time next week when they spend a day visiting the West Bend School District. Parents and residents have the opportunity to meet each candidate for informal conversations at the Silverbrook Intermediate School library, 120 N. Silverbrook Drive, West Bend, at 4 p.m. on May 22, 23, and 24.

The board intends to vote on its selection of the next superintendent on May 24, 2018, although contract details and agreements are anticipated to take several days. It is expected the successful candidate will officially join the district on July 1, 2018.

Updates & tidbits

-The Board of Directors of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County announces the appointment of Jaymee Harvey Willms as Executive Director effective Monday, May 21, 2018.

– A doctor is on trial in Mobile, Alabama accused in the 2016 death of singer Matthew Roberts. The 38-year-old former band member with Three Doors Down was found dead at the Hampton Inn in West Bend. Following a federal investigation Dr. Richard Snellgrove was indicted in November 2016 for Illegal Drug Distribution in relation to the death of Roberts. Snellgrove is accused of unlawful distribution of drugs and health care fraud in a case tied to the death of Matthew Roberts. Snellgrove is currently on trial. If convicted he faces up to 240 years in prison.

-Katie Kuhn, Birth Center RN and Hannah Streese, Outpatient Care Center wound care technician (right), both of West Bend, have been named recipients of the 2018 Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin St. Joseph’s Hospital Excellence in Nursing Award and Excellence in Nursing Support Personnel Award

-The Bürgermeister of Germantown invites you to Mai Fest at Friedenfeld Park on May 19, and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun.

-Pizza Ranch, 2020 W. Washington Street, opens Monday, May 21 in West Bend.

-The Survivor Celebration Lunch for Relay for Life in West Bend is Saturday, May 19 from noon – 2 p.m. at Holy Angels. On behalf of the American Cancer Society and the Relay for Life of West Bend, you and your caregiver are invited to join us to spend time with fellow survivors, see your Relay For Life friends, and enjoy a wonderful {free} meal just for you.

-The FREE Adult Swim Lesson week is coming up at the Kettle Moraine YMCA. Whether you are a seasoned swimmer or just starting out, there is a class for everyone. If you haven’t had a chance to register for any classes yet, there is still time.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Charming Paws moving forward following accident

The owners of Charming Paws, 1410 Lang Street, in West Bend have issued a statement regarding an accident this week between two animals in its care.

Doctor of veterinary medicine Brian Rollmann is with Little Animal Hospital in Port Washington. He said it’s not necessarily the temperament of the animal or the breed, but it’s the strength.

From Ashley Skinkis                                                                             May 10, 2018

The owners of Charming Paws Doggie Daycare in West Bend are acknowledging an unfortunate incident Monday afternoon at the business on Lang Street.

While three employees were working with the dog participants, a pit bull broke through a chain link fence that was bolted to a wall and entered a different room. The 90-pound dog attacked and killed a goldendoodle puppy.

The incident happened in a matter of seconds. Staff immediately put the larger dog in an enclosed area, protected all other dogs, triaged the victim and called the owners.

The goldendoodle was immediately taken to the nearest local vet.

Ashley Skinkis, owner of Charming Paws, contacted police.

“There were never any problems with either dog,” said Skinkis. “They were in separate, fenced-off areas of the daycare. Each area is separated by size of dog and temperament. Neither dog had a history of aggressive behavior.”

The owners of the adult dog confirmed they raised their dog from a puppy and never had any aggression issues. The owners did put the dog down immediately after the attack.

Within hours of the incident Skinkis said the fencing in the playground of the daycare had been fixed and reinforced with a 4-inch thick wall between the large and small animal areas.

Skinkis said staff was in the same area of the daycare when the incident happened. She said “all staff followed appropriate procedures.”

Skinkis asks that people respect the families whose animals were involved and respect the staff affected by this horrible incident. Charming Paws will continue to provide a high-standard of care for all of our clients and their pets.

“Ninety-percent of pit bulls are the most loving, wonderful, down-to-earth dogs but if you have one that’s dog aggressive, the mass of the dog is a big factor,” he said. “They’re so strong that if they are aggressive they can do a lot more damage.”

Charming Paws gives a temperament test prior to accepting a dog as a client. Rollmann said dogs act different in different situations. “Some dogs act different around puppies then they do around adult dogs,” he said. “Some dogs will have a prey response and if an animal has a prey response then they treat that dog as prey.”

As far as a pit bull raised in a family setting with children, Rollmann said “that’s not an uncommon story.”

“I worked with another vet who had a pit bull who peacefully lived with his blind cat for 10 years and then he came home one day and no cat,” he said. “Ten years and no problems but if something triggers the prey drive they go into autopilot.”

Moving forward Skinkis said they added a 4-inch-thick wood-frame wall as a barrier between the two rooms.

“That’s in addition to the chain link fence bolted to the wall,” Skinkis said.  “We’re also going to be extra diligent on personality assessment and reviewing the core personalities of each dog.”

Eileen Hanrahan of West Bend has two Dobermans she drops off at Charming Paws. She said she knows accidents happen and it could have happened anywhere.

“You run the risk if you take them there or walk your dog on the street or take them to the dog park, something can always happen,” said Hanrahan. “The staff at Charming Paws is always so caring and they treat these dogs like their own kids. I feel very comfortable keeping my dog there.”

Huge award for Museum of Wisconsin Art

Some well-deserved recognition for the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend as it has been named ‘Best Gallery Or Museum In Wisconsin’ by American Art Awards.

“This 32,000-square-foot museum houses five permanent collection galleries, three temporary exhibition spaces, classrooms, a large atrium and more. Over 5,000 works of contemporary and historic art by more than 350 artists,” is how American Art Awards describes MOWA.

An article in medium.com by reporter Thom Bierdz read, “The Museum Of Wisconsin Art won the distinction of Best Gallery Or Museum In Wisconsin, 2018, and one of American Art Awards 25 Best American Galleries / Museums, 2018.”

Jessica Wildes is director of communications and marketing at MOWA. “We are truly honored to be named one of the top 25 museums in America and the top museum in Wisconsin by the American Art Awards,” said Wildes.  “Our selection was based on our innovative philosophy where everyone’s a member.”

One of the other keys to success, according to Wildes, is MOWA’s ability to wrap its arms around all its guests.

“Instead of repeat admission fees, every visitor becomes a member to the museum for a full year upon their first visit to MOWA,” she said. “Membership includes unlimited gallery viewing, 175+ free-for-member programs, and access to special events and classes for a full year.”

Click HERE to learn more about the Museum of Wisconsin Art.

Don’t forget the Banner Artwalk, brought to you by the Downtown West Bend Association, is Saturday, May 12 from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m.  There is free admission into the museum and the galleries. Enjoy live music by the Kal Bergendahl Project. A silent auction of 2016 banners will take place. There will also be snacks and a cash bar.

Big restaurant announcement from Jodi Janisse-Kanzenbach

Huge news for Jodi Janisse-Kanzenbach and her husband Cory as the pair just became business partners with Don and Deb Reinbold at Barley Pop Pub, N116 W16137 Main Street, in Germantown.

Many recognize Janisse-Kanzenbach as the owner and head chef at Café Soeurette, 111 N. Main Street, in downtown West Bend.

“This was just a great opportunity to grow as a restaurateur,” said Janisse-Kanzenbach. “What I liked about the Barley Pop is its rich history, the building is from 1870s and they’ve been in business a long time.”

The Reinbolds are also cheering the partnership.  “My husband Don and I are excited Jodi and Cory have decided to partner with us at the Barley Pop,” said co-owner Deb Reinbold. “They bring a passion for food and beverage and a focus on the dining experience, which is something we have always strived for.”

Janisse-Kanzenbach said she’s excited about the upcoming development in Germantown, noting the up-scale apartments to the south, the new Gehl Foods Performing Arts Pavilion in Firemen’s Park, and the Village’s investment in the downtown.

As far as the future is concerned, Janisse-Kanzenbach said “it’ll be status quo at both the Barley Pop and Café Soeurette.

“We are not looking to change the concept of the Barley Pop,” she said. “What they’re doing is good; we want to keep it for what it is.”

Café Soeurette will also stay open and carry on its 11-year farm-to-table tradition.

In the short term there will be some scheduling changes so Janisse-Kanzenbach can hit the ground running and wrap her arms around both restaurants.

Starting the week of May 6, Café Soeurette will close Tuesdays and Barley Pop will not serve lunch on Monday and Tuesday. “Once the merge is completed and we get our staff up to speed we’ll fall back into the old schedules,” Janisse-Kanzenbach said.

Barley Pop is open seven days a week and features pub food, burgers and appetizers. “We might do a few changes to the menu but I will put it in the hands of our chef Jorge Villasenor who does a phenomenal job,” said Janisse-Kanzenbach.

Also note, Barley Pop Pub and Café Soeurette will accept gift cards for either place at both places as well. With the partnership comes job opportunity. The Barley Pop is looking for bartenders and servers. Applications can be filled out at the restaurant.

Military signing day at Slinger High School

It was military signing day this week at Slinger High School. Eight students signed letters committing to serve in the Army, Navy, Marines, and National Guard.

Extra chairs had to be brought in as family, friends and military recruiters were all in attendance.

All of the recruits were given red, white, and royal blue lanyards donated by the Allenton American Legion Post. The seniors were instructed to wear the lanyards at graduation.

Jay Gindt – Army, Nate Shirley – Navy, Keegan Berger – Navy, Jack Cairns – Marines, Rebekah Seidel – Marines, Brooke Rahlf – Army Reserves, August Beyer – Navy ROTC, and

Morgynn Michel – Army National Guard.

Doctors at West Bend Medical agree to property purchase in West Bend

West Bend Medical has entered in to an agreement with the City of West Bend to purchase the former Cooley’s site in downtown West Bend. This site is on Water Street and Wisconsin Avenue and is currently made up of a parking lot and one acre of open land.

West Bend Medical in Menomonee Falls has a desire to return home to the City of West Bend by second quarter of 2019. Dr. Carey Cameron, Dr. Chad Tamez and Dr. Brian Wolter of West Bend Medical believe their practice is best served downtown and the City of West Bend is pleased to assist in the process.

This process will include an agreement with city and the sale of the lands owned by the Redevelopment Authority (RDA) and the City of West Bend. Clinic Administrator, Brett Cameron worked closely with city staff to get to this point.

“We are excited for the opportunity to bring our brand of healthcare back to the heart of West Bend,” said Dr. Chad Tamez.

“We (the physicians and staff of West Bend Medical) have dedicated our careers to helping our community be healthier both inside and outside the office,” said Dr. Cameron.

Doctor Wolter said, “Redeveloping an unused site in the downtown area is simply an extension of our commitment to making West Bend a better place to live.”

RDA Chairman, Kirk Emerich said, “As our downtown continues to grow West Bend Medical will be an excellent addition and great community partner.”

Former Gehl property in downtown West Bend sold

The City of West Bend and Van Horn Development, LLC have entered in to an agreement for the purchase of the former Gehl site in downtown West Bend, specifically 8 acres on the southwest corner of Water Street and Forest Avenue. The site is being acquired for development of a mix of commercial and multi-family residential buildings.

Chris Merklein, Director of Development with Van Horn Real Estate, contacted the City of West Bend to discuss the 8-acre former Gehl site.

All plans must still be finalized however Merklein is optimistic about the possibilities. “Everything about this site and community feels right,” Merklein said. “Not only does the Gehl site itself have tremendous potential, but the community behind it is a true force. The positive energy in this area is undeniable and we are proud to be part of it.”

Merklein was encouraged by the downtown Riverwalk renovation and the development of the nearby cultural campus at the Museum of Wisconsin Art.

Merklein made it clear he is not strictly looking for an investment but to become a community partner. The City of West Bend is supportive and thankful for the next major development in the downtown.

“Congratulations to the Van Horn Real Estate team on taking the first step toward something that should prove to be truly special for West Bend,” said Mayor Kraig Sadownikow.

Hartford’s Veterans Memorial Aquatic Center set to open in 2 weeks      By Samantha Sali

Mother Nature is not making it easy on the Park and Rec crew in Hartford as it works to prep Veterans Memorial Aquatic Center for opening day.

“The late snowstorms have pushed off our crews from getting into the facility this year which is giving them less time to prep the pool for its second full year of service,” said City Administrator Steve Volkert. “As of April 19, snow was still surrounding the facility. With the warmer temps in late April, all the snow has now melted and work on the pool surface is now in full swing.”

The staff hope to fill the pool next week, getting ready for the scheduled May 26 opening. Last year, the pool opened May 28.

For the most part, the hours are the same as last year, though they shortened weekend hours. Last year, open swim was from 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. and this season it’s 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. Those interested in lap swim can rejoice in better hours, as last year you could only squeeze in laps from 6 a.m. – 9 a.m. and this year the hours have been extended to, 6 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

As the swim season starts, don’t forget to bring your season passes or cash (they don’t take credit cards, but there is an ATM onsite), your own towels, coast guard approved life jackets, water bottles, extra cash for snacks (you cannot bring in food), and 50 cents if you want a locker to keep your valuables safe.

Season passes are already available for purchase, which you can pick up at the Recreation Center during office hours (Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. and Fridays, 7 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.)

Final numbers released for 2018 Tailgate Tour benefiting The Threshold, Inc.

The final numbers are in from the 2018 Tailgate Tour in West Bend benefiting The Threshold, Inc.

According to Executive Director Laura Eggert the Threshold raised $82,766.51.

“We exceeded our goal of $65,000,” said Eggert.  “Everyone involved is thrilled about the outcome and extremely complimentary of our work in making this a successful event.”

Eggert credits the support from V.I.P. Sponsors and others who donated their time, talent and treasure. “Of course, the Packer fans came out in droves to support our cause as well.  We were very pleased with the turnout, despite the not-so-nice weather,” she said.

Money from the event will be used to enhance current and new programming at The Threshold, Inc.

As of March 1, The Threshold, Inc. took over operation of the 1022 Club in Hartford, which offers respite for families caring for loved ones who may be frail elderly, have Alzheimer’s or Dementia.

“We also started an after-hours social program for adults with disabilities, which takes place within our community as well as throughout our state,” said Eggert.  “Currently, we are working on launching an after-hours Youth Mentor program, which provides young people time for socialization with their peers and offers many educational activities.”

Reviews for the Tailgate Tour were fabulous.  “Everyone we spoke with said they had a great time, things ran very smoothly, they thoroughly enjoyed the activities and were very excited to meet the Packer players and President/CEO Mark Murphy up-close,” Eggert said.

“The Threshold and the people with disabilities whom we serve are grateful for the support of this wonderful community.  Thanks to everyone who contributed to our mission of, ‘Creating Opportunities for People with Disabilities.’”

UW-WC tennis teams capture titles at WCC State Tennis Tournament     By Sue Bausch

UW-Washington County Men’s and Women’s Tennis teams captured the 2018 Wisconsin Collegiate Conference State Tennis Tournament at the Nielsen Tennis Stadium in Madison in a two-day competition.

The men’s team won 19 out of 22 possible team points and the women’s team won 9 out of 14 possible team points.  This is the first time in the WCC history of men’s tennis that the team was able to win the championship outright on the first day of competition. This is the first time in campus history both teams won the WCC State Tournament in the same year.

The men’s team: Matt Melsheimer – Runner – Up #1 Doubles, Jordan Buchacher – State Champion #2 Singles & #2 Doubles, Chrlie Mundinger –  State Champion #3 Singles & Runner Up #1 Doubles, Lucas Gough – State Champion #4 Singles & #2 Doubles, Brody Jossart – State Champion #5 Singles & #3 Doubles, Alex Schmidt – State Champion #6 Singles & #3 Doubles

The women’s team: Meghan MacFarlane – won the quarter finals match at #1 Singles, Kaytie Lighthizer – State Champion #2 Doubles – won the quarter finals match at #2 Singles, Sammie Brown – State Champion #3 Singles, Audra Brandenburg – State Champion #4 Singles and #2 Doubles.

Unveiling Phase 1 construction at Good Shepherd Ev. Lutheran Church in West Bend

On Sunday, May 6 parishioners at Good Shepherd Ev. Lutheran Church, 777 S. Indiana Ave., in West Bend had their first meeting in their new fellowship room which has a capacity of 150 people. The $3.2 million Phase 1 construction project is fast approaching the completion stage.

Updates were presented including construction of the new fireside room, elevator, library, classrooms, heating and air conditioning system, security system, storage areas, and offices. Over $50,000 has been saved by volunteers doing painting and staining and helping with other construction needs.

Members were also given the opportunity to donate money on items not in the Phase 1 budget including appliances, furniture, window dressings, etc. The church’s theme is “Connected to Christ,” “Connected to One Another,” and “Connected to our Community.”

West Bend School Board approves survey for $80 million referendum

This week the West Bend School Board approved part of a $35,000 package for a community-wide survey regarding Jackson Elementary School and the West Bend High Schools.

The survey would be created by Slinger-based School Perceptions. Bill Foster is president of that company. During an April 30 meeting when Foster then went through some slides of what the survey would say he indicated the options for a response would be four choices: High, medium, low or not sure.

One note, there is no selection to decline a specific project or vote ‘no’ on an answer.

In March when the board hired and met with consulting firm McPherson & Jacobson the board asked whether it should move forward with a referendum while it was looking for a new superintendent at the same time.

McPherson & Jacobson said “it would be wise to wait and do it right.” Board member Nancy Justman said “we’re in a really unique situation … and I think we should play it out.”

Below are notes from an April 30, 2018 meeting that put numbers over $80 million on a proposed referendum.

Funding Support: The cost to address all the projects identified in the survey is estimated at nearly $80 million. (again – discussion about adding taxes and interest to that number). Given the cost it may not be realistic to complete all of these projects at one time. Therefore, the work may need to be completed in phases, based on the priorities of the community and its willingness to financially support the projects.

Jackson Elementary:  Build a new school          $23 million (2-story school,  82,000 square feet significantly larger than current Jackson)

High School Projects:

Classrooms, Libraries and Science Labs                   $10.5 million

Cafeteria             $2.2 million (CFAC members said this was never discussed in their meetings)

Technical Education (Shop) and Engineering Labs   $7.6 million

Weight Room/ Locker rooms                                    $4.0 million

Safety and security     $1.5 million (WBSD applied for a state grant to cover this cost or a portion)

Building infrastructure                                              $31.3 million

There was a note about being a good steward of taxpayer money and paying off a portion of the debt. “This drop in loan payments gives the community an opportunity to borrow up to $35 million in facility upgrades with no tax increase over the current level.”

A CFAC member indicated the tax may not go up but the lifetime of payments would be extended 10 to 20 more years.

Board member Kurt Rebholz also campaigned on being able to save taxpayer money with energy grants and upgrades. So far no figures have been released on any energy program or potential savings.

On a history note:

Taking a look at the current referendums the West Bend School District is currently paying off….

In April 2009, voters in West Bend approved a $29.3 million plan to renovate, as well as build an addition to Badger Middle School.

In November 2012 the West Bend School District passed a $22.8 million referendum to close Barton Elementary School, expand Silverbrook School and add classrooms and a gym at Green Tree Elementary School. The actual total cost of the referendum with taxes and interest was $31.975 million with a 15-year payback on borrowing.

After the Nov. 2012 referendum passed the $31.9 million total was added on top of the $29.3 million payment for the 2009 Badger referendum. The target date to completely pay off the debt on both referendums, totaling about $61 million*, is 2029.

The final segment of discussion provided a table showing the tax impact for various referendum amounts. The tax impact on a 20-year bond with an estimated interest of 4.5% was not calculated into the total.

For example: If the referendum was $40 million the estimated increase on a home valued at $100,000 would be $5 per year.

For an $80 million referendum the tax impact on a $100,000 home would be $48 per year.  This would be over the span of 20 years, again without taxes and interest calculated into the total.

A clarification was made asking that in the spirit of transparency the board make it clear on the survey the tax impact would only be for the school referendum. Taxpayers would be made aware their bill would also include an annual tax impact from the state, county, city, MPTC, and the school district which annual has voted to tax to the max. The referendum amount would be on top of those other annual charges.

The work session concluded with an attempt to sign off on the survey questions by May 7 so the survey could be mailed before the end of the month.

The district indicated it is aiming for a November referendum. CG Schmidt has been hired as the contractor for the project. (*request is being made to confirm current referendum debt)

Also the board moved into closed session to get an update on the superintendent search, the contract – which is reportedly up to $175,000 per year. The last superintendent was signed at $155,000 a year and in 2016 the superintendent received a 2-year contract extension. In December 2017 the school board released the superintendent.

The amount of benefits received in the agreement were not disclosed and are part of a second open records request in January. Details from that second request were never received.  According to a story posted Jan. 18, 2018 The agreement also indicates Olson would receive full salary “less applicable withholdings” for the remainder of his contract. He will also receive moving expenses of $10,000 and unused vacation of $10,432.63.

During the executive session the board also lookrf into purchasing more property. That purchase site has not been disclosed.

Updates & tidbits

The Downtown West Bend Association’s 6th annual Banner ArtWalk 2018 is today, Saturday, May 12 from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend.

-West Bend tennis standout Lexi Keberle has made it big in the Big 10. As a freshman at UW-Madison Keberle was a unanimous First Team selection All-Big 10. Keberle played No. 1 singles for UW- Madison through the fall and spring. As a freshman Keberle “earned the most wins of anyone on her team with a 25–10 record including tour matches with a 13–5 record from the first slot in dual play.” In high school Keberle was a 2-time State Champion her Freshman and Sophomore years.

-The Bürgermeister of Germantown invites you to Mai Fest at Friedenfeld Park on May 18, 19, and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun.

-The weather was perfect for the 16th annual Scotty Schoen Youth Fish Derby on Hasmer Lake in Jackson. Hundreds of kids and their parents took advantage of the warm weather. Kids came armed with pole and bait and tested their casting skills. Winners included: Micah Harris registered a 19-inch sucker, Liam Gambino landed an 11.25-inch bass, Lily Shaw hauled in a 21 1/2-inch northern, and Landon Hatch reeled in a 24-inch northern.Fishing licenses were not needed by participants 15 and under. The event was sponsored by Jackson Park and Rec.

-The Survivor Celebration Lunch for Relay for Life in West Bend is Saturday, May 19 from noon – 2 p.m. at Holy Angels. On behalf of the American Cancer Society and the Relay for Life of West Bend, you and your caregiver are invited to join us to spend time with fellow survivors, see your Relay For Life friends, and enjoy a wonderful {free} meal just for you.

-The FREE Adult Swim Lesson week is coming up at the Kettle Moraine YMCA. Whether you are a seasoned swimmer or just starting out, there is a class for everyone. If you haven’t had a chance to register for any classes yet, there is still time.

-On May 5, 2018, with A Great Gatsby theme, students from Slinger High School danced away the night at the Chandelier Ballroom in Hartford. Prom court: Ben Hoitink escorting Sidney Selness; Bennett Connolly escorting Charmaine Dee; Thomas Boden escorting Riley Alton; King Evan Sievers escorting Queen Anna Richardson; Charlie Covert escorting Samantha Carloni; Jake Bernarde escorting Hannah Brown; Alex Drifka escorting Jane Schaub; Trevor Ulesich escorting Paige Fassbender.

-Youth Frontiers, the leading character education organization in the Upper Midwest, will present its 2018 Character Award to Destiny Kudelko, a senior at Kewaskum High School in Kewaskum, Wis., for her exceptional character and leadership skills. To further recognize her accomplishments Kudelko received a $2,500 college scholarship.

-Cedar Community in West Bend is proud to announce its marketing team recently won the Gold award for its Live More magazine and Live More brand video from the Aster Awards.

– Students in Marcia Milam’s first-grade class at St. John’s Lutheran in West Bend got an up-close look at their lesson this week as the students gathered on the lawn along Fifth Avenue to watch work crews lift trusses into place at the new Kwik Trip. “We’re learning about pulleys and simple machines,” said Milam. “I told them we’d go and see the real thing.” With pads of white drawing paper in their laps 16 students carefully watch the crane-and-pulley system at work and their No. 2 pencils documented what they saw.  Some of their impressions are below. This will be the second Kwik Trip in West Bend. It’s expected to open in June.

-The Kettle Moraine Monday Night Bass Tournament kicked off its 16 week season on Monday, May 7 on Pike Lake. 1st Place-Tom Faucher and Jody Dent who bagged an impressive 5-fish limit weighing in at 12.71 pounds. They also had big bass honors with a 3.61 pound largemouth.

2nd Place-Doug Duernburger and Mason Koerber, brought in a 5-fish limit at 11.96 pounds.

3rd Place-Marv Thiesen and Roger Kutz took the spot with a 5-fish limit coming in at 11.62 pounds. Marv had the hot stick of the night registering 5-fish for Angler-of-the-Year points.

4th Place- Caleb Niedfeldt and Adam Zinda with a 5-fish limit at 10.53 pounds. The league is headed to Kettle Moraine Lake next Monday night, May 14. Story courtesy Bryan Miller.

New owner for Aiden O’Reilly’s

It’s still a couple weeks away yet but watch for Mark Merten, 56, to take over Aiden O’ Reilly’s in Allenton.

Merten, a native of Slinger and 1980 graduate of Slinger High School, said he was looking for something new and found it in the bar/restaurant, 402 Main Street, in Allenton.

“I like the woodwork in the place and the back bar reminds me of an old soda bar from the 1800s,” said Merten.

While O’Reilly’s has the atmosphere of an Irish-pub, Merten said that can easily be changed.

“We’re going to call it Slippery Rail,” said Merten. “We were thinking about The Whistle Stop but we were looking at the LLC list and there is already a campground with dib’s on that. My wife started looking at old railroad terms and the Slippery Rail seemed to stick; the names got a nice kick.”

Merten grew up in the food business. He spoke fondly about his memories of working alongside Joe and LuAnne Schwai when they ran Schwai’s in Cedar Creek.

“I’d help them butcher deer and run the restaurant,” he said. “When the County Fair was still in Slinger I’d work with them at their booth. I know Tommy and Mike well and I worked with LuAnne and Joe and the sunshine thing and all that.”

Merten’s mind raced with memories of Schwai’s and the old country store with cases of beer, people coming in on the weekends, the meat counter, and the old terrazzo floor.

“I really missed all that and that’s what I liked about this restaurant/bar is the big back bar, the décor, the changes made since the fire, the upstairs hall is nice; there’s a lot of quality in this old building it’s nice to see it maintained,” he said.

Along with the name change Merten said he will be adding real broasted chicken by Trademark and once he’s situated he’ll explore adding take out to the menu.

“The big thing is I want to maintain the current customer base and keep everybody happy,” he said.  Merten expects to close on the deal with owner Mike Duchelle on May 29.

On a history note: The brick building that sits to the east of the Canadian National Railway dates to 1912. It used to be the old Central Hotel. Over the years the name changed to Side Track and later Grand Central Station.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Padway’s on Big Cedar Lake has sold

Padway’s on Big Cedar Lake, 4919 State Road 144, in West Bend has sold. Dan and Peggy Mueller, owners of several George Webb franchises, closed on the purchase of the restaurant Monday, May 1.

“I’m excited, confident and scared as hell,” said Mueller who turned 49 Monday.

“I’ve always wanted to do a supper club,” said Mueller. “I liked what I’ve been doing at George Webb but I always wanted something more.”

Mueller has been looking at Padway’s for a while. He was attracted to the restaurant because of his lifetime on the lake and his grandparents’ ties to the area.

Neighbors will recognize the head nod to history as Mueller will rename the restaurant.

“I’m going to call it Mueller’s Linden Inn,” he said. “We’re keeping the menu the same for now but we will be adding some things. The staff will stay the same and we will be hiring.”

Over the next few months Mueller will be making some minor changes but in the near future they will be revamping the banquet hall. “We’re going to take it out of the ’70s and bringing it into modern day,” he said.

This will be a family venture as Mueller’s wife Peggy will be joining him. She will do some bookkeeping and pitch in where needed.

Dan Mueller is graduate of Sussex Hamilton High School and a 1989 graduate of Milwaukee Area Technical College. He has an associate degree in hotel and cooking management. “I’ve worked at restaurants like the Quilted Bear, the former Nardo’s Passport Inn, and in the catering department at Quad Graphics,” said Mueller.

For the last 25 years he’s been a franchisee and an owner operator for George Webb’s Corporation. “Currently I own two George Webb’s, one in Hartford and the other in West Bend and at one point in my career I owned five George Webb’s,” Mueller said.

Previous owner Joe Weinshel closed on the purchase of the old Wegner’s Cedar Lake Inn in August 2014 when the asking price was $1 million. The asking price in 2017 was $795,000.

The old Linden Inn is a lakeside restaurant that’s been an institution for over 50 years on Big Cedar Lake has a new owner.

“When I was a kid, I told my mom I was going to own this place,” said Weinshel. “That was back in the 1950s when it was really nice and called the Linden Inn.”

Memories of the food at the old supper club resonate with locals along the lake. Back in the day when Dick Peel owned the Linden Inn neighbors remember the key lime pie, the brandy sauce sundae or the skipper sundae made with a scoop of ice cream, waffle cone, two chocolate chip eyes and a cherry nose.

Owls nesting in wall of old Lithia Brewery

It looks like someone gives a ‘hoot’ about the old Lithia Brewery in West Bend as a mother owl and her baby are nesting in what looks like an old vent in the side of the building on Franklin Street.

Ric Koch moved into Rivershores recently and was out on his bike when he spotted the trail of dung on the side of the building. Next he saw the baby owl. While we were filming the mother owl flew the coop. (what are the chances?)

Below the nesting site is a rather graphic collection of last night’s dinner.  Koch said owls will take in food and then yack up hair and bones and what not; a lot of that is in a small grassy area right under the nest. (you have been warned)

Chris Schmidt owns the brewery building; he stopped to take a look. The conversation gravitated to what happens when the baby tries its first flight? The nest is about 25 feet off the ground and below is cement. Schmidt, who rents space in the building to the West Bend Dance and Tumbling Troope, suggested he go inside and bring out a couple of tumbling mats to help cushion the fall.

A volunteer at Pineview Wildlife Education Center said the Great-horned Owl typically start looking for mates in December and usually there are 2 – 3 eggs.  There is clearly just one owlet in the nest.

Raptoreducationgroup.com provides a couple more insights: Great-horned Owls are our earliest nesting birds in WI. It seems a contradiction; however, the adult owls are often on nests by late January when the winds are howling and snow covers our northern landscape. Great-horned Owls do not build their own nest. Instead, they choose an old nest of a crow, hawk, or even a squirrel to call their own. When the young owls are 6-8 weeks old, they begin to venture from their nest. This is before they can actually fly. Nature’s method provides owlets opportunities to develop their leg muscles that will very soon be catching their own prey. In a natural setting owlets that appear to have fallen from their nest actually have fledged. In a natural wooded area, bushes and smaller trees provide a ladder of sorts and allow the chicks to climb to a higher perch until they can fly. When owls nest in a city with concrete below them rather than a soft forest floor, problems arise.  

Mr. Tony’s BBQ to open Friday, May 11

On Tuesday, May 1 the West Bend Plan Commission agreed to a temporary permit for Mr. Tony’s BBQ to allow the food truck and trailer to park in the Menards parking lot, 575 W. Paradise Drive. The truck would be in the north east end of the lot.

Mr. Tony’s BBQ will be able to come to town and serve his delicious fare eight times this year. He will open Friday, May 11.

“I have a little bit of a following,” said Tony Roy.  “We’re going to start with 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. … quite frankly I normally stay until 6 p.m. but judging from your page I don’t know if I can bring enough food.” Mr. Tony’s offers southern style pit BBQ. He was voted the No. 3 BBQ food truck in the nation in 2015 by Mobile-Cuisine.  His menu includes brisket sandwiches, pulled pork, pulled chicken, St. Louis style ribs, popcorn chicken and fries and meat by the pound. (see menu below).

Dr. Engelbrecht has died

Steven Jay Engelbrecht, O.D., 59, passed away on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at his home, surrounded by his loving family.

Born and raised in West Bend, Steve graduated from West Bend East High School in 1977, after which he received a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981. He married his high school sweetheart, Kathryn (nee Beistle) on July 3, 1982 at St. Frances Cabrini. He then went on to complete his Doctor of Optometry degree from Indiana University in 1985.

Steve served as a dedicated doctor to his patients and the West Bend community for twenty-seven years, working first with Dr. Paul Rice and then with the West Bend Clinic/Froedtert Health Center. He additionally was an active participant serving on numerous state and local associations and boards, including the Wisconsin Optometric Association, the St. Frances Cabrini School Board, the YMCA Board, and the West Bend Noon Rotary.

Steve is best remembered for his athleticism, sense of humor, and prowess on the dance floor. He especially enjoyed playing a round of golf at the West Bend Country Club in the company of good friends. Most of all, he loved spending time with his family at his home on Silver Lake.

A Celebration of Steve’s life with a Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 5 at St. Frances Cabrini Parish, 1025 S. 7th Ave, West Bend, WI 53095. Visitation will take place at the church on Saturday, May 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Former Washington County Sheriff’s Deputy has died

Jack E. Wirth passed away Wednesday May 2, 2018 at the age of 87 years. He was born May 20, 1930 in Hartford, the son of Elmer and Emma (nee Korth). Jack was a Washington County Deputy Sheriff for 21 years. He was a past member of the Hartford Fire Department for 24 years and member of Hartford VFW Post #8834 and Hartford American Legion Courtney-Carr-Milner Post 19. Visitation is Sunday May 6, 2018 from 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. at the funeral home. Closing prayers at 4 p.m. Private interment.

West Bend School District considers $80 million referendum

Six members of the West Bend School Board, (Tiffany Larson was not in attendance), spent nearly two hours discussing a proposed survey to test the waters on a possible $80 million referendum. The referendums would focus on Jackson Elementary and the West Bend High Schools.

The survey would be created by Slinger-based School Perceptions. Bill Foster, the president of the company, was in attendance.

Highlights of the meeting are below:

-Foster said the taxpayers and teaching staff could take the survey online or via a paper questionnaire.  Foster said it would be mailed to 24,000 people within the school district boundaries.

Some of the most spirited conversation came when board member Nancy Justman asked if taxpayers in Jackson haven’t supported a referendum in the past why would voters in the Village of Jackson support a request for a new school.

-Justman said, “It has been discussed widely in the past that Jackson has not supported a referendum in the past. Dave Ross said that is true. As we continue to look at Jackson – if the Village of Jackson voters aren’t willing to support a referendum and that speaks loudly to me that they don’t want to update the school.”

-Justman said, “We already bus our Jackson students up here 5 – 12th grade.” There are currently 372 students at Jackson Elementary School.

-Options for Jackson included remodel the current elementary school, build new, or incorporate the kids at the elementary school into the West Bend schools.

-Board member Ken Schmidt said one of the key questions that hadn’t been brought up was the cost. “What are the projected costs to remodel, or update, or buy peripheral property. I want to have some ballpark figures before I’d be able to make a sound decision on how I’d vote.”

-Board member Joel Ongert corresponded via phone and questioned whether the $23 million for a new Jackson accounted for the $4 million already save up. (Editor’s note – than figure has also been quoted at $5 million saved for Jackson).

-Board member Tonnie Schmidt corresponded via phone said, “We need to take the opportunity to educate the community and what’s led up to this point. The background would be helpful.”

-Ken Schmidt said, “It’s OK to put information in about the Jackson fund. Be careful about making this a leading statement. We can put it out as a piece of information but don’t want it to tip the scales.  For sake of transparency we need to realize there’s a declining student population that’s going down about 100 students per year and how does that impact Jackson?”

-Joel Ongert said, “Our school district is way bigger than just the Village of Jackson. If the Town of West Bend, City of West Bend, Town of Trenton and Newburg, and Barton. If all those people vote yes for a new school in Jackson it will pass. So even if the people in the Village of Jackson vote ‘no’ not only would the survey show it but a referendum would pass.”

-Joel Ongert said, “If the survey says go to referendum and you do the math and it failed because of Jackson then we talk to the people of Jackson. That has to be done after it would fail.”

Members of the Citizens Facility Advisory Committee were invited to attend Monday’s meeting. The CFAC volunteered more than 13 weeks of their time to tour schools and provide input on the direction the district should take regarding Jackson Elementary and the WBHS.

At one point in the meeting CFAC member Carol Hegar questioned some of the information being read into the survey. Board member Nancy Justman said it wasn’t common practice to let members of the public speak during a work session and then CFAC member Susan Crysdale Kist said, “Then why did you invite us?”

Board members took a straw poll to see if CFAC members could speak and everyone agree except Board President Joel Ongert who said ‘no.’

-CFAC member Carol Heger – “I believe there is wrong information on Jackson Elementary and I want to make sure this is corrected. The school is not over 100 years old. Renovations were done in 1970s or 80s. Roof replacement should not be part of the referendum, that’s misleading. Financially the renovation was discussed and the reason most of us went for the new school was the site.  The difficulty of the site was an issue. Another thing that was misleading was the sentence ‘based on the building’s condition as well as an assessment of educational inadequacies…’ What’s the assessment of educations inadequacy? That wasn’t explained to us other than today’s current educational research that says students should be educated in these huge two-story atrium.”

-CFAC member Mary Weigand – “I’m concerned about referencing a 100-year-old Jackson. That’s just one small area. Let’s just tear down that old front so we can stop saying Jackson is 100 years old.  I spoke with Dave Ross about the concerns about safety and he said to me “Jackson is not falling down – if there were problems with safety I’d be first to raise the alarm.”  There are no safety issues with crossing the road.  Police have it under control. Comments about being landlocked, there’s a large area to east a large area to east of current school. I was also very offended about the educational inadequacies that were put on paper because Jackson has the second highest elementary scores other than McLane which is the oldest school in the district. So that has nothing to do with the age of the building. When the 25-year plan was brought up now there are much fewer students. The question should be to ask the community if they’re aware the numbers are declining.”

-Susan Crysdale Kist – “It’s the numbers I’m concerned about. There are 100 less because you moved the 5th grade out. Busing kids to West Bend? Where will you put them? If you close Jackson you will be changing school boundaries again and that’s not a popular thing.”

Foster then went through some slides of what the survey would say.  Options for a response would be four choices: High, medium, low or not sure.  One note, there is no selection to decline a specific project.

Funding Support: The cost to address all the projects identified in the survey is estimated at nearly $80 million. (again – discussion about adding taxes and interest to that number). Given the cost it may not be realistic to complete all of these projects at one time. Therefore, the work may need to be completed in phases, based on the priorities of the community and its willingness to financially support the projects.

Jackson Elementary:  Build a new school          $23 million (2-story school,  82,000 square feet significantly larger than current Jackson)

High School Projects:

Classrooms, Libraries and Science Labs                   $10.5 million

Cafeteria               $2.2 million (CFAC members said this was never discussed in their meetings)

Technical Education (Shop) and Engineering Labs   $7.6 million

Weight Room/ Locker rooms                                    $4.0 million

Safety and security  $1.5 million (WBSD has applied for a state grant which could cover this cost or a portion)

Building infrastructure   $31.3 million

 

There was a note about being a good steward of taxpayer money and paying off a portion of the debt. “This drop in loan payments gives the community an opportunity to borrow up to $35 million in facility upgrades with no tax increase over the current level.”

A CFAC member indicated the tax may not go up but the lifetime of payments would be extended 10 to 20 more years.

On a history note:

Taking a look at the current referendums the West Bend School District is currently paying off….

In April 2009, voters in West Bend approved a $29.3 million plan to renovate, as well as build an addition to Badger Middle School.

In November 2012 the West Bend School District passed a $22.8 million referendum to close Barton Elementary School, expand Silverbrook School and add classrooms and a gym at Green Tree Elementary School. The actual total cost of the referendum with taxes and interest was $31.975 million with a 15-year payback on borrowing.

After the Nov. 2012 referendum passed the $31.9 million total was added on top of the $29.3 million payment for the 2009 Badger referendum.

The target date to completely pay off the debt on both referendums, totaling about $61 million*, is 2029.

The final segment of discussion provided a table showing the tax impact for various referendum amounts. The tax impact on a 20-year bond with an estimated interest of 4.5% was not calculated into the total.

For example: If the referendum was $40 million the estimated increase on a home valued at $100,000 would be $5 per year.

For an $80 million referendum the tax impact on a $100,000 home would be $48 per year.  This would be over the span of 20 years, again without taxes and interest calculated into the total.

A clarification was made asking that in the spirit of transparency the board make it clear on the survey the tax impact would only be for the school referendum. Taxpayers would be made aware their bill would also include an annual tax impact from the state, county, city, MPTC, and the school district which annual has voted to tax to the max. The referendum amount would be on top of those other annual charges.

The work session concluded with an attempt to sign off on the survey questions by May 7 so the survey could be mailed before the end of the month.

The district indicated it is aiming for a November referendum.CG Schmidt has been hired as the contractor for the project. (*request is being made to confirm current referendum debt)

House fires rage in Kewaskum

Authorities are discussing some of the possible causes of the Kewaskum house fires this week.

According to authorities oily rags from deck staining were stored in a container in the sun.  The deck was on south side of the home at the initial home that caught fire on Odawa Circle in Kewaskum. It has also been determined the Jefferson Street fire was a flaring ember from the original fire scene a couple blocks away.

No injuries were reported however there was a high school student at home at the time and they got out OK thanks to assistance of Kewaskum Police.  Dogs also escaped safe from the home.

No injuries were reported among residents or firefighters.

More than a half dozen area fire departments are on scene at a structure fire, 845 Odawa Circle Kewaskum. The call came in around 2 p.m.

Matt and Amy Herriges have been walking around the charred rubble of what used to be their family home on Odawa Circle in Kewaskum. Today the wind kicked up; Matt warned to protect your eyes from small shards of glass and debris.

The couple asked to relay a message thanking everyone for their support in this dire time. They were thankful for the volunteer firefighters who worked so hard. They were thankful for the generosity of friends and family and friends they didn’t even know they had. They were thankful for the prayers and support.

A walk around the remains of the home is numbing. The frame of a wall is distinguishable, as well as a child’s bike and a car. It’s hard to believe no one was injured. The Herriges family is thankful for that too.

Nathan and Kelly Kjer and their family are also working through damage to their home and they too are thankful for all the prayers and support. Note below is from Nathan.

“During one of the worst days in our lives it was wonderful to have so much support from everyone. I am proud to call Kewaskum my home for 13 years. We have wonderful neighbors that have helped us with everything possible. For all the bad things going on in this world when something like this happens it truly shows how good people are. Words can’t describe how much all this means to us. We are thankful every day that our daughter made it out safe with the dogs. The fire fighters and police were all amazing. And our neighbors feel more like family now than ever. ” Thank you.  Nate and Kelly Kjer

Kettle Moraine Symphony to perform with UW-WC Moraine Chorus

On Sunday, May 6, UW-WC’s Moraine Chorus, the Kettle Moraine Symphony, and three soloists will be collaborating in a performance of Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. The spring concert begins at 3 p.m. at Holy Hill, 1525 Carmel Road in Hubertus.  Tickets are $18 Adult, $15 Senior and $5 Student with ID.

On Sunday, May 13, the Moraine Symphonic Band will present a concert in the campus theatre at 3 p.m.  The band will perform Children’s March by Percy Grainger, Robert Jager’s Third Suite, October by Eric Whitacre and other well-known works for band. The concert is free and open to the public.

Updates & tidbits

Don’t miss the West Bend “Ride Of Silence” on Wednesday, May 16.  Bicyclists will meet in the MOWA parking lot off Veterans Drive at 7 p.m.

– On Saturday, May 19, 2018 the Slinger Area Music Booster Association (SAMBA) will be holding its 12th Annual Chicken Dinner at Veteran’s Memorial Park-Pavilion, in Allenton. It is SAMBA’s biggest fundraiser of the year.

– The West Bend Theatre Company is having a benefit concert with Joe Gallo to raise funds and awareness of the theatre mission. “An Evening of Show Tunes with Joseph Gallo, Tenor” will be at Bibinger’s in West Bend on May 19 at 7:30 p.m. Reservations are limited for this intimate performance. Tickets are exclusively available at wbtheatreco.com

-Friends of West Bend Park & Rec are inviting companies to host their company summer party at either the West Bend Biergarten, Regner Fest and German Night. Contact Lori Yahr for more information at loriyahr@gmail.com

– Mai Fest is coming to Friedenfeld Park in Germantown on May 18, 19 and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun. There will be food from Schwai’s Fish Friday (Friday night only), Germantown Kiwanis Club, Brats, Frankfurters, Hamburgers, and Potato Pancakes. Come enjoy the fun.

-The Downtown West Bend Association is gearing up for the 6th annual Banner ArtWalk. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art on Saturday, May 12.

– The 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is at Gehring View Farms this year, 4630 Highway 83 in Hartford. The host family will be Eugene and Christine Gehring and their family Derik, Jordan and Emily. This year’s Breakfast will be Saturday, June 9, rain or shine.

– “Logan’s Laps for Love” is May 26 starting at 9 a.m. at Hartford High School track. All money raised will go to the Love for Logan Fund at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Don Ramon Mexican Restaurant coming to West Bend

There’s a new restaurant opening in West Bend. Don Ramon Mexican Restaurant will be opening this summer in the former Mother’s Day location, 501 Wildwood Road in West Bend.

“We’ve been in Mayville since 2011 and we’ve been chasing West Bend since then,” said owner Felix Sanchez.

Some of the places he considered included the former Ponderosa building, soon to be Pizza Ranch and the old Pizza Hut restaurant, which closed in February 2016.

“We have a lot of customers right now from West Bend,” said Sanchez. “People come from Slinger and Jackson and we looked at other buildings but some were overpriced.”

Sanchez signed a contract two weeks ago with Sam Fejzuli, owner of Mother’s Day.

Fejzuli purchased the former Dairy Queen property in May 2015. That building has been in foreclosure since January 2014. Two short years later Fejzuli closed his restaurant in October 2017. Fejzuli said he had trouble getting employees and “keeping everybody happy.”

Don Ramon has a large menu. “We’re authentic Mexican, tacos are our specialty and we marinate and cut our own meat,” said Sanchez.

With a background in the restaurant industry Sanchez said he started his career when he was 16 years old. “I was in bigger cities like Lexington, Kentucky and Illinois and Minnesota,” he said. “I then opened in a small town in Mayville and we’ve been able to build a family here.”

Now 35 years old, Sanchez employs 13 people. Don Ramon is expected to open in West Bend on July 1.

Opening-day schedule for new restaurants in West Bend

There are quite a few new establishments opening in West Bend and someone asked for a list on the locations and when they’re opening.

The most anticipated opening is for Pizza Ranch, 2020 W. Washington Street. That word came down Thursday that the restaurant will open May 21.

The neighboring McDonald’s on W. Washington Street is open in the drive-thru but the lobby is closed for an interior remodel. That will reopen May 12… or there about.

The old Dublin’s will reportedly open in August. The building at 110 Wisconsin Street is going through an interior remodel and plans are on the table to add a second story outdoor patio.

Eaton’s Fresh Pizza will open in July at 803 E. Paradise Drive. Click HERE for more details.

Firehouse Subs will open in June at 1733 S. Main Street in West Bend.

This week WashingtonCountyInsider.com was the first to tell you about Don Ramon Mexican Restaurant coming to West Bend.  Owner Felix Sanchez said he will open in the former Mother’s Day location, 501 Wildwood Road. Most likely that will be a June opening.

And coming up this summer watch for a major remodel of the McDonald’s on S. Main Street which includes getting rid of the indoor playground and the Galactic theme.

As far as Ries’ Sausage Plus reopening… that’s going to take a while. Stay tuned!

The Barbershop a Hair Salon for Men is opening in West Bend

The Barbershop a Hair Salon for Men will open next month in West Bend, 2028 S. Main Street.

This will be our 50th location,” said owner Todd Degner.

It was 13 years ago when Degner, 50, and his wife Shannon opened their first location. “We were basically the new kids on the block. We were a male-centric salon designed specifically for men. It’s something that straddles between a traditional barbershop and a salon,” Degner said.

“We have a comfortable, timeless look and feel that’s the same for men and boys and grandpas and students and millionaires.”

Degner said what makes The Barbershop different is its commitment to employees. “Thirteen years ago when I started researching the industry I found it’s really the employee base in the salon industry has been exploited and commoditized,” Degner said. “So right from the get go we created a foundation built around excellent employees and we’re going to attract and retain the best people in the industry.”

Degner said the way they do that is through a set of benefits and professional atmosphere.

“Our team of stylists and barbers have comprehensive health care benefits, dental, vision, company-matching 401K, sick benefits and maternity benefits that’s really becoming a benchmark in the industry because of us.”

Degner is an IT and consulting guy in his previous life. In 2009 he retired and committed himself full time to The Barbershop.

While never one to get behind the business end of a scissors or razor, Degner does recall some memorable haircuts from his youth.

“When I was a kid my dad would whip out the clippers and give us what we called ‘the heiney,’” he said. “It was basically a flat top but really he took our hair down to the skin. The minute school was out that was our look for summer.”

Degner remembers his father taking him to a small barbershop in Rhinelander called ‘Doug’s Barbershop.’

“The barber’s name was Mr. Walters and he was my dad’s barber and then mine and I just remember the vibe and the smells and the sounds and the magazines and the conversations and that really is what inspired me to bring that sort of tradition back,” he said.

“One of the more satisfying things for us is just seeing that community in each of our shop and seeing people talk to each other, one-on-one, and not texting or being on the phone.”

Degner is looking to open prior to Memorial Day; a build out is currently underway. Other locations in Wisconsin include Fond du Lac, Wausau, Stevens Point, Sheboygan and Manitowoc.

New restaurant open at Shalom Wildlife Zoo

There’s a rustic feel to the new Grizzly Grill at Shalom Wildlife Zoo, 1901 Shalom Drive in West Bend. The new restaurant opens Saturday, April 28. It’s part of the zoo’s Arbor Day celebration that includes tree planting.

On Friday afternoon we got a sneak peek inside the new eatery and a first look at the new menu. While staff were pleased to show off the new place they talked highlight of the restaurant addition, the family-friendly atmosphere and they reassured everyone there would not be bear or hasenpfeffer on the menu.

The food selection is affordable with most items $10 and below. There are recommendations, from the animals at Shalom of course, including Lewis’s Favorite Southwest Burger and Elk’s Favorite a garden salad. Clark’s Favorite is listed as a Western Burger and Fox’s Favorite is a hot dog. There are both hot and cold selections along with extras including the traditional Wisconsin cheese curds, a healthy fruit cup and even a kid’s menu.

One of the fun things at the Grizzly Grill is the ‘no waste’ policy as there’s a huge collection pot for garbage. If you can’t finish your meal toss the remains in the pot and they will be fed to the animals who eagerly welcome leftovers. The Grizzly Grill opens at 10:30 a.m. and closes at 5 p.m.

Kettle Moraine Symphony to perform with UW-WC Moraine Chorus

On Sunday, May 6, UW-WC’s Moraine Chorus, the Kettle Moraine Symphony, and three soloists will be collaborating in a performance of Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. The spring concert begins at 3 p.m. at Holy Hill, 1525 Carmel Road in Hubertus.  Tickets are $18 Adult, $15 Senior and $5 Student with ID.

On Sunday, May 13, the Moraine Symphonic Band will present a concert in the campus theatre at 3 p.m.  The band will perform Children’s March by Percy Grainger, Robert Jager’s Third Suite, October by Eric Whitacre and other well-known works for band. The concert is free and open to the public.

Police investigate reports of fraudulent activity on credit/debit cards

April 27, 2018 – Washington Co., WI – On Thursday, April 26 and Friday, April 27 several citizens in West Bend reported fraudulent activity on their credit cards and debit accounts.

These victims have accounts at numerous area banks. All of the victims are still in possession of their credit and debit cards. The West Bend Police Department is investigating to determine where and how the victims’ information was compromised.

The West Bend Police Department encourages residents to pay close attention to their financial accounts at all times, and to report all incidents of Fraud and Identity Theft to the West Bend Police Department.

Washington County Sheriff’s Captain Bruce Theusch said one woman reported some fraudulent activity on Thursday. The woman was from the Village of Richfield and her credit card was used at the Walmart in Germantown.

Janiece Maxwell is owner of Mad Max and the BP in West Bend. “We’ve had no problems at all and we do checks of the gas pumps on a consistent basis and we have had no skimmers,” said Maxwell.

A skimmer allows a thief to retrieve credit card and PIN numbers with a wireless device. According to krebsonsecurity.com  “These devices connect directly to the pump’s power supply, and include a Bluetooth chip that enables thieves to retrieve the stolen data wirelessly — just by pulling up to the pump and opening up a laptop.”

Maxwell was particularly upset about “fake news reports that identified her station and others in town.”

“One of the things the fake news said was that there was a skimmer on our ATM and that’s so funny because I’m the only one that has keys to the ATM so there’s no possible way to get in and somebody would have to get in the store and put the skimmer in while our employees are here,” Maxwell said. “That’s not happening.”

Pat Osowski is owner of the Shell stations in West Bend. He said they too do regular pump checks and they have backup security to make sure there’s no tampering. “We put a sticker on it that has a number so if somebody would go in there they would have to break that seal so we would notice if someone was in there,” he said.

Scott Sadownikow owns the Citgo in Barton and the BP on the east end of Highway 33 and he said the police have not contacted him and they have top-notch security measures in place. “I’ve even gone so far as to intentionally place larger stickers on the pumps so customers can see them,” he said.

Sadownikow said his station employees conduct daily checks and there are tamper-proof labels on the pumps. He said they’ve had no incidents at his gas station outlets.

One woman in West Bend is reportedly working with police after she said her debit card was “hacked for the second time this month.” Police are reviewing transactions with the card and working with area banks.

West Bend Police Lt. Paul Pokorski said they’ve made contact with area banks. He said they are investigating and he admits they don’t know if a skimmer device is even involved at this point.

Rotarians plant trees on Arbor Day

Members of the West Bend Sunrise Rotary and West Bend Noon Rotary put the business end of a shovel to use on Sunday planting trees at Lac Lawrann. The event was all part of Earth Day.

Later the week the folks at Lac Lawrann considered a new way to remove the invasive species buckthorn. One of the growing trends is to bring in goats.

According to an article in The Growler, “Not only do goats love the taste of buckthorn and burdock, but these plants also tend to grow at a goat’s eye level, right where they browse for a snack.”

There’s still quite a bit of work to do if goats are brought to the local nature conservancy. They would not be allowed to freely roam; fencing would have to be put in place and then adjusted to spread out the grazing territory. Stay tuned!

Holy Angels School is a finalist for Innovations in Catholic Education

Holy Angels School, in West Bend, was recently recognized by the publishers of Today’s Catholic Teacher magazine at the annual National Catholic Educational Association’s convention in Cincinnati. Holy Angels was one of three finalists for the Innovations in Catholic Education (ICE) award presented by the magazine for innovations in curriculum.  The award was presented for the unique World Languages Program at Holy Angels which includes Spanish, German, and Chinese.

In order to prepare students for a multi-cultural interdependent society, Holy Angels School supports the importance of offering a sequential program of study in world culture and language. Several outcomes of the program at Holy Angels include: 1) the ability to communicate in a second or third world language, with emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills; 2) an awareness of and appreciation for God’s gift of diversity in other cultures; and 3) provision for the option of advanced placement in the high school world language program for those students who choose to continue in a world language. A basic belief that a world language program is important for everyone mandates that the program be part of the regular school curriculum, at all grades, for all students.

As much as possible, the study of world language/culture correlates with other areas of the curriculum, such as social studies. Therefore, world language is considered to be both an extension of other areas of curriculum and a curriculum in its own right.

Students in grades kindergarten through grade five receive instruction in German, Spanish and Chinese language and culture on a rotating trimester schedule. Students in grades six through eight concentrate on one of the world languages for three years. This language is chosen prior to sixth grade placement. By the end of eighth grade, it is possible for students to complete the equivalency of level one at the high school, in their respective language. The program has been a part of the Holy Angels curriculum for more than 25 years.

Updates & tidbits

Signs of summer cropping up in my yard. How about you? I find the crocus are so small and colorful and mighty to be able to weather the cool nights.

– On Saturday, May 19, 2018 the Slinger Area Music Booster Association (SAMBA) will be holding its 12th Annual Chicken Dinner at Veteran’s Memorial Park-Pavilion, in Allenton. It is SAMBA’s biggest fundraiser of the year.

-Friends of West Bend Park & Rec are inviting companies to host their company summer party at either the West Bend Biergarten, Regner Fest and German Night. Contact Lori Yahr for more information at loriyahr@gmail.com

– Mai Fest is coming to Friedenfeld Park in Germantown on May 18, 19 and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun. There will be food from Schwai’s Fish Friday (Friday night only), Germantown Kiwanis Club, Brats, Frankfurters, Hamburgers, and Potato Pancakes. Come enjoy the fun.

-The Downtown West Bend Association is gearing up for the 6th annual Banner ArtWalk. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art on Saturday, May 12.

– The 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is at Gehring View Farms this year, 4630 Highway 83 in Hartford. The host family will be Eugene and Christine Gehring and their family Derik, Jordan and Emily. This year’s Breakfast will be Saturday, June 9, rain or shine.

-American Legion Post 36 of West Bend will hold a brat fry Friday, Saturday and Sunday, May 11, 12 and 13 at the corner of Washington Street and 15th Avenue in West Bend. Hours are 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

– “Logan’s Laps for Love” is May 26 starting at 9 a.m. at Hartford High School track. All money raised will go to the Love for Logan Fund at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Boston Store closing in West Bend

There were more than 10 people waiting outside Wednesday morning at Boston Store in West Bend as the clerk opened the door for shoppers. Word had already spread that the store at 1291 W. Paradise Drive was among the hundreds closing and going out of business.

“I guess I wasn’t surprised,” said Marie Selenka of Slinger.  “We lost Pier One and now we’re losing this and it’s a shame.”

There were quite a few shoppers combing the store and taking advantage of sales and many mentioned they felt it was ‘only a matter of time.’ “I have mixed emotions because I thought the quality of merchandise had been going down,” said Debbie R. from Richfield.

“I don’t think the buyers have my age group (60) in mind and they always have these coupons and most of the time they’re not good for the item you purchase so it doesn’t surprise me with the competition out there.”

Debbie said she grew up with Boston Store. “My first Boston Store was Capitol Court in Milwaukee. We would go to The Grand and my mother used to work at Schusters in Milwaukee.”

“So many people buy online now. I still like the brick and mortar stores so the new generation is different,” Debbie said. “We’re from the Waupun area and they’re all closing,” said Kathy F.

“I like the Boston Store and I don’t like that they’re closing but what are you going to do,” she said.  “I’m actually kind of torn because I do a lot of online shopping because it’s convenient and I understand it’s hard for stores to stay open.”

According to a news release Bon-Ton President and CEO Bill Tracy said, “While we are disappointed by this outcome and tried very hard to identify bidders interested in operating the business as a going concern, we are committed to working constructively with the winning bidder to ensure an orderly wind-down of operations that minimizes the impact of this development on our associates, customers, vendors and the communities we serve.”

Officials said “the Great American Group LLC and Tiger Capital Group LLC will acquire the inventory and certain other assets of the department store chain.”

In West Bend, a sale related to the liquidation is underway. Sources said about 50 employees at Boston Store in West Bend will be out of work because of the closure. More details regarding the store closure and liquidation plans will be released shortly.

Reuters news service has been reporting “another retailer might acquire some of the stores and operate them under one of the Bon-Ton names.”

Former Washington Co. Supervisor Jack German has died

John George (Jack) German left Serenity Villa and made the trip to heaven be with his wife La Rae of 63 years on April 20, 2018. Jack had suffered a stroke in February as a result of a broken heart.

He was born to George Anton German V and Katherine Ann Ruddy on June 4. 1930 in Saint Killian, Wisconsin. The Family moved to West Bend and Jack attended Holy Angeles School and West Bend High School. Jack joined the Naval Reserve then enlisted in the U.S. Army at seventeen and served with the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Benning Georgia. After his active duty he served an additional six years in the Army Reserve and rose to the rank of Master Sargent.

Jack worked first as a mechanic and then in automobile sales in West Bend for several dealerships working last at Tennis Buick. Cooking was his passion and he spent most of his free time cooking for his friends. In 1972 his long-time dream of his own restaurant came to be when he and La Rae purchased the Little Red Inn in Saint Lawrence. They operated this iconic landmark until they retired.

Jacks life was one of public service and commitment. He served as a part time Deputy Sheriff with the Washington County Sheriffs Department and was elected constable and board supervisor for the Town of Addison. In 1978 he was elected to the Washington County Board of Supervisors, serving for a time as the Vice-Chairman and remained on the board until 2004.

Jack was an Honorary (Life) member of the Allenton Volunteer Fire Department, American Legion Allenton Fohl-Martin Post 483 and Saint Francis Cabrini Church. Past Member of Slinger-Allenton Rotary, Allenton Sportsman Club, Resurrection Parish, Wisconsin Restaurant Association, Washington County Tavern League and Allenton Area Advancement Association. He was one of the founders of the Allenton Area Advancement Association’s Buffalo Feed.

On June 28, 1952 Jack Married (Margarete) La Rae Umbs at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Allenton. They spent most of their married lives in Allenton and in retirement years also enjoyed spending time in Eagle River and Arizona. La Rae was called home to our Lord Savior Jesus Christ on January 9, 2016.

A memorial Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Apr. 24, at Resurrection Catholic Church with the Rev. Richard Stoffel presiding. Burial will be at a later date in Sacred Heart Cemetery. The family will greet relatives and friends from 1 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Tuesday at the church. The family has requested memorials to Resurrection Catholic Parish or St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Parish.

Deer Management Committee makes venison donation to WB Food Pantry

The first of several donations of venison were dropped off Monday, April 16 at the Food Pantry in West Bend. Dist. 1 alderman John Butschlick said there will be 35 pounds of ground venison donated. The meat comes from the three deer killed during the Deer Management Hunt last December.

Prior to the hunt it was determined the cost to process the deer would be covered by the DNR. The meat was processed by Loehr’s Meat Service in Campbellsport. There were three deer killed during the Deer Management Hunt.

On Monday night during the West Bend Common Council meeting alderman Butschlick gave an update on the future of the hunt. He said sharpshooters have been discussed and a combined effort with bow hunters may be the next step. The cost of sharpshooters was discussed during a March meeting of the Deer Management Committee.

Tribute to outgoing aldermen Dist. 3 Mike Chevalier and Dist. 7 Adam Williquette

The West Bend Common Council tipped its hat to a pair of longstanding aldermen on Monday night as they participated in their final meetings.

Mayor Kraig Sadownikow read resolutions honoring Dist. 3 alderman Mike Chevalier and Dist. 7 alderman Adam Williquette. Sadownikow recognized Chevalier for “devoting a substantial portion of his time for the betterment and enrichment of” West Bend.

Alderman Williquette was recognized for representing his constituents in the City of West Bend and Barton for six years. “Both of these two guys really exemplify the old phrase that says if you have the ability to make a positive impact then you have the responsibility to make a positive impact,” said Sadownikow.

Newly-elected alderman Andrew Chevalier and Justice Madl were sworn into office on Tuesday, April 17.

City of West Bend secures $555K grant for Riverwalk

Some positive news for neighbors in the City of West Bend as word came down that the State Joint Finance Committee approved a grant for $555,000 to help finance the downtown Riverwalk Project. The note below was sent to city staff from Park and Rec Director Craig Hoeppner.

Good afternoon, I’m pleased to report the State Joint Finance Committee officially approved our DNR Stewardship Grant in the amount of $555K+ at 1:03 p.m. Wednesday.

There had been a lot of discussion with the State on this topic over the past three weeks.

This is a $100,000 reduction from what was tentatively awarded, but we are confident the project is financially sound and this keeps the Downtown Riverwalk – East Project on track for our expected 2018 construction schedule.

A big thank you to the Mayor, Jay Shambeau, Cindy Leinss and  Sen. Duey Strobel for all of their efforts in making this large DNR Stewardship grant a reality.   We are looking forward to a great project this summer.  Park and Rec Director Craig Hoeppner

Mayor Kraig Sadownikow watched the process as the proposal went before State Joint Finance Committee in Madison and cheered the 11-4 vote to award the grant. “This is the final piece of the funding puzzle,” said Sadownikow. “I’m thankful to Sen. Strobel for supporting this project through the Joint Finance Committee. Everyone on the Joint Finance Committee recognized that we’ve got a very unique funding mechanism with some local dollars, some state dollars and then a very significant portion of locally, privately-raised money and that doesn’t happen very often in a public works project like this so it’s great West Bend stepped up to support something that’s been needed for decades.”

Signs posted for Eaton’s Fresh Pizza in West Bend

The sign for Eaton’s Fresh Pizza now graces the front door at 830 E. Paradise Drive in West Bend. Looking through the windows of the new home for the franchise shows the plumbing has been put in place and while there wasn’t much activity there is some progress as the build out is underway. In February, WashingtonCountyInsider.com announced Eaton’s Pizza would be returning to West Bend. The franchise owner is coming in from Fond du Lac. According to the owner Eaton’s Fresh Pizza will be located in the same strip mall anchored by Thrivent Financial. There’s a target opening date of July 1. The store will employ about 10 people.

Holy Angels students make generous donation                               By Renee Altendorf

This past Lent the primary students at Holy Angels School participated in a prayer walk.  After every 10 steps each student stopped to think about a person and then say a prayer for them. Each student walked 100 steps and said 10 prayers for a total of 9,800 steps and 980 prayers. The goal was for each student to have their family donate $1 or a penny per step.  The primary teachers are proud to announce students surpassed their goal and raised $1,422 for the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County.

Saturday lineup announced for Washington County Fair

Washington County Fair officials are pleased to announce the Saturday 2018 Headliners at the West Bend Mutual Insurance Silver Lining Amphitheater.

The Washington County Fair will host a trio of country artists on Saturday, July 28- Walker Hayes with Carly Pearce and Ryan Kinder.

Kicking off the night will be Ryan Kinder. For Alabama native Ryan Kinder, it’s all about the music. Whether he dons his favorite boots or rocks his vintage Chuck Taylors when he takes the stage, the music is what demands audiences’ attention and defines this up-and-coming sensation with a soulful Southern sound. “I just let the music do the talking,” says Kinder. Ryan’s debut single “Kiss Me When I’m Down,” where his powerful vocal is rivaled only by his amazing guitar playing, is turning heads and blowing minds. This young up-and-comer is poised for a soaring music career that will keep him on the road, in the spotlight and on the radio.

Carly Pearce takes the stage next. Her first single, “If My Name was Whiskey,” has been a listener favorite on Sirius XM’s The Highway over the last year, was named one of Rolling Stones’ “10 Artists to Watch This Summer” and became one of CMT’s “Next Women of Country” in 2016.

Headlining the evening will be Walker Hayes, a tried-and-true Nashville standout. He’s an original in a town all-too-often rife with mimicry and compromise.   “

Ticket prices range from $20-$35 and include admission to the Fair. For more information on the Washington County Fair, visit www.wcfairpark.com/fair

Successful Grandparents Day at St. Peter School in Slinger

The grandkids wore out their grandparents at St. Peter School in Slinger on Wednesday. It was Grandparents Day and the kids were in charge.

The day started with an all-school Mass and then the students grabbed their grandparents’ hand and participated in a day full of fun. Some of the activities included coloring plates. Others took part in a competitive game of BINGO and then there was the dancing. (see video).

A couple of the families were third generation at St. Peter School including the Richard Kratz who graduated from St. Peter in 1968. His children then attended St. Peter and now his grandchildren are enrolled. Ann Kratz said she felt the kids “get a better education than in the public school, the children are able to grow their faith and the teachers are committed to working with each child, even those who need more attention in reading and math.”

5K teacher Beth Herrigas said over 240 people participated in Grandparents Day and all had a fantastic time celebrating the great opportunities in education offered at a private school.

Updates & tidbits

– A bunch of rock stars from Mr. Olson’s class are working to promote their 2nd annual Autism Soup Night on April 23 at the West Bend West High School cafeteria. Soup will be served 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. There are 16 soups to choose from.

-Dennis Degenhardt is scheduled to announce his candidacy for the 58th Assembly District on April 26. There is a Partisan Primary on Tuesday, Aug. 14 and the General Election is Tuesday, Nov. 6. During the last Special Election, Rep. Rick Gundrum won the seat left vacant following the death of Rep. Bob Gannon. Rep. Gundrum is currently serving a 1-year term.

– S/Sgt. Henry F. Gumm Post 486, Jackson, donates $3,000 for the purchase of three pieces of handicap-friendly playground equipment. This is part of a $300,000 project across from the Jackson Community Center at Hickory Lane Inclusive Playground.

– Mai Fest is coming to Friedenfeld Park in Germantown on May 18, 19 and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun. There will be food from Schwai’s Fish Friday (Friday night only), Germantown Kiwanis Club, Brats, Frankfurters, Hamburgers, and Potato Pancakes. Come enjoy the fun.

-The Downtown West Bend Association is gearing up for the 6th annual Banner ArtWalk. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art on Saturday, May 12.

– The 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is at Gehring View Farms this year, 4630 Highway 83 in Hartford. The host family will be Eugene and Christine Gehring and their family Derik, Jordan and Emily. This year’s Breakfast will be Saturday, June 9, rain or shine.

-American Legion Post 36 of West Bend will hold a brat fry Friday, Saturday and Sunday, May 11, 12 and 13 at the corner of Washington Street and 15th Avenue in West Bend. Hours are 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

– Holy Angels Students of the Month for March include Olivia Klausmeier, Emily Rauch and Will Mueller.

Run for Logan set for May 26 at Hartford High School

Logan Johnson was a healthy 8-year-old boy when he was diagnosed with an illness called Myocarditis (Inflammation of the heart) which doctors believe was caused by Parvovirus B-19 (known as 5th disease).

The nightmare began on May 6, 2017. Logan played a soccer game that morning. He had been sick with a low-grade fever the day before and seemed to be feeling better, but the game wore him out and the fever returned.

Later that day, he complained of pain in his chest and abdomen. He collapsed at home and was taken by ambulance to Children’s Hospital. After many hours and extensive tests, ultrasounds, and lab work – he was diagnosed with Myocarditis. He was placed on life support to try to save him. After three excruciating weeks in the hospital, Logan went to heaven and is now safe in the arms of Jesus.

Two days prior to becoming ill Logan asked his mom what his purpose was and why God made him. Little did this 8 year old know that his story and journey would touch so many lives and bring people closer to their faith in God.

Logan’s family is hoping that through “Logan’s Laps for Love” event money raised will help Children’s Hospital to find out more about Myocarditis, ways to prevent and treat the illness, and maybe someday soon no other family will have to endure the loss of loved one from this disease.

The event begins at 9 a.m. on May 26 at Hartford High School track. All money raised will go to the Love for Logan Fund at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Ten veterans from Washington Co. on Saturday’s Honor Flight

There will be 10 veterans from Washington County participating in Saturday’s Stars and Stripes Honor Flight to Washington D.C.

One of the oldest vets on the flight will be 95-year-old WWII veteran Dave Lowe from the Town of Erin.

Lowe was drafted was 19 years old when he entered service Feb. 1, 1943 and served until Feb. 23, 1946.

“I went to Biloxi, Mississippi for basic training and then to Tishomingo, Oklahoma to learn how to take care of airplanes,” said Lowe.

Army training had Lowe shipped to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, Kelly Field in Texas and to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, to Seattle and then onto Guam in November 1944.

“It took 32 days to get from Seattle to Guam,” he said about traveling by merchant ship.

Lowe worked as a clerk typist and then onto the warehouse and finally he worked as a corporal as an orderly. “I swept the day room, took care of letters and I was in charge of the beer supply,” he said. “Everybody got two cans of beer a week and we had cases of it back where I got the mail. When somebody would ask for an extra can or two for their friends, I couldn’t give them a can but I could give them a case.

“I had a lot of friends,” Lowe said.

Lowe’s son James Lowe from Madison will be going with his dad as his guardian on the flight.

Dave Lowe said he is looking forward to seeing the WWII Memorial in Washington D.C. His friend Rocky Rococo sent him a post card from Hawaii in 1944 and then never made it home because he was involved in an accident with a military vehicle.

Other veterans from Washington County participating in Saturday’s Honor Flight include:

Colgate: Wayne Fischer, Vietnam War Army, Germantown: Greg Eggum, Vietnam War Army, Hartford: Brad Wing, Vietnam War Navy, Kewaskum: Thomas Kohn, Vietnam War Marines, West Bend: Jerry Goratowski, Vietnam War Navy, John “Pete” Pedersen, Vietnam War Army, James Meinberg, Vietnam War Air Force pilot, James Pogantsch, Vietnam War Army , William Crowley, Vietnam War Army.

Special local tribute during Saturday’s Packer Tailgate Tour

While many football fans across Washington County can say they’re the BIGGEST Green Bay Packer supporter, two women will be highlighted Saturday, April 14 for their dedication to the Green and Gold.

Kay Thomas, 54, of West Bend was a long-time employee at The Threshold Inc. and a top-notch Green Bay Packer fan.

Ida Motiff, 98, of West Bend was also a hard-core Green Bay Packer fan. Probably one of the oldest too as Ida was born the year the Packers were established. Her obituary read, “Ida was also devoted Green Bay Packer fan holding season Packer tickets since 1950. She went to at least one game every year until she was 96 years of age.”

At Cedar Ridge Ida would wear her green and gold tennis shoes and wave her pom poms during every Packer game. She loved them even when they lost.

As part of Saturday’s Tailgate a special tribute will be made to both women who died earlier this year. The 13th Annual Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour which will visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

On Saturday, April 14 from 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., the Packers Tailgate Tour is making its final stop at the West Bend High School Fieldhouse.  One hundred percent of the proceeds for the event will benefit the Threshold, Inc.

Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Kenny Clark, Blake Martinez, and Ty Montgomery, and Packers alumni Rob Davis, Antonio Freeman and Bubba Franks.

John Bloor, Executive Director for the Threshold said, “This will be an exciting, once-in-a-lifetime event for the Threshold and for this entire community!”

Laura Eggert, Director of PR/Fund Development for the Threshold said, “We are thankful to our friend, Josh McCutcheon of PeopleServe in West Bend.  Josh is an avid Packer fan and encouraged the Packers to make a stop in our great city!  We are so thrilled and we feel blessed to have been chosen as the last stop of the tour.”  Tailgate party ticket prices:  $40 all-inclusive ticket (only 600 available) – Includes food, giveaways, Q&A sessions and autographs of all seven celebrities (bring one item per person or use Packers’ giveaway item) and $10 ticket general admission ticket – Includes access to the Q&A sessions as well as tailgate party activities.  Food and beverages will be available for purchase.

American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Award agent

Donald Patnode and his team at American Family Insurance in West Bend have been recognized for earning the 2017 American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Award for outstanding customer experience.

The team at American Family Insurance in West Bend includes Nancy Monday, Mary Mikkelson, Cindy Moran, Susie Patnode, Tim Novotny and Christine Heuer.

“Our goal is to strive to always do our best,” said Patnode. “We take care of our customers’ needs directly and by phone not voicemail.”

American Family Insurance in West Bend has won the award in consecutive years since 2014. Patnode said that shows the consistency in company service and high praise to be recognized and respected by its customers.

“The award reinforces that taking care of our customers is our No. 1 goal,” he said. “It’s our customers telling us we are doing a good job.”

The service excellence distinction was determined through an evaluation process conducted under guidelines established through the company’s American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Certification Program. The process consists of a customer satisfaction survey which measures customers’ overall experience with their current American Family agent.

Grandparents Day celebrated at Holy Angels School                          By Mike Sternig

This year’s annual Grandparents Day took on a whole new level of activity as grandparents (and grandpals) joined Holy Angels students in a morning of adventure and fun.

The special guests were introduced to the morning’s activities as they gathered in the gym (with bleacher seating)…no small feat, but many were experienced from watching volleyball or basketball games through the years.  The Holy Angels Chorus provided some entertainment and then it was off to meet with grandkids and see the school.

Activities in the classrooms included: making slime (a very popular stop!), creating Madlibs, sharing stories of then and now, grandparent interviews, ecosystem game, bucket lists, photos and snacks, gym activities, and much more. The Book Fair in the library was filled with students and grandparents.

Everyone gathered in church for a special Grandparents Mass. Rev. Pat Heppe reminded everyone of the importance of sharing our “good news” with each other. Good news can be our own stories of faith as well as the really big story of Jesus’ Resurrection and gift of New Life.

Crowded field in 59th Assembly District race

It’s becoming quite the crowded field as another hat is thrown in the ring to take over Rep. Jesse Kremer’s seat in the 59th Assembly District.

This week Village of Kewaskum native Timothy Ramthun from the Township of Auburn in Fond Du Lac County announced he was filing candidacy papers.

“Representative Kremer has given the 59th District much to be grateful for, with commitment to protect the pre-born, our 1st and 2nd Amendment rights, initiatives to aid in improvements for police and firemen protections, and enhancements to the farming industry. These were all difficult subjects to address and Mr. Kremer did not waiver. Should I be blessed to serve as his successor, I will continue in these and many other causes we share passion in, ensuring the best chance for completion of unfinished business,” said Ramthun.

Ramthun joins Ty Bodden of St. Cloud and Rachel Mixon of Hartford who announced their candidacy earlier this year.

The 59th District encompasses municipalities in Washington, Fond Du Lac, Sheboygan and Calumet Counties. The Republican Primary is Tuesday, August 14 and the general election is Tuesday, Nov. 6.

Cal Fitness expands in Slinger

Village Beverage in Slinger rang up its last sale over the weekend. After 43 years in business the local liquor store closed but it won’t be empty long.

Cal Fitness & Performance, 311 E. Washington Street, is moving in. “I’m partnering with another couple and our plan is to expand the fitness club into the liquor store area,” said Cal Fitness owner Tony Callen.

“The area will focus on strength training and there will be more space for turf and push and pull sleds. We will have more area to train the high school kids and the middle schoolers.”

Callen is the strength and agility coach at Slinger High School.  He has been in business three years. The changeover is currently under construction and the new space should be open in the next month.

A note of thanks to Ken Stellmacher and Monte Schmiege

A salute Monday night to outgoing West Bend School Board members Tim Stellmacher and Monte Schmiege. Board member Ken Schmidt praised Schmiege for his commitment to the board including treasurer and policy chairman. Schmidt was thankful for Schmiege who did his homework, research and he had “integrity, urgency and he made our school district better in many ways including his oversight of curriculum.”

“Monte acted with honesty, courtesy, respect, humility, fact and research-based decision making,” said Schmidt. Stellmacher was also praised by Schmidt for his financial acumen.

Former School Board candidate Mary Weigand also praised Schmiege for his “integrity, wisdom, and thoughtful research and you’re going to be missed by the community of West Bend.”

“Monte was one of two board members who voted against an immoral and inappropriate questionnaire for minors that will be happening potentially this spring. I know it’s very difficult to accomplish things in the humanistic, government-run education system but Monte you fought and you persevered and you spent three years of your life caring about the education of our kids and I really want to thank you for that,” said Weigand.

Also during Monday night’s meeting:

-The district has received 22 applications for Superintendent. According to a report from the search firm some of the candidates they “feel terrific about and some not so terrific.” Nobody knew Monday night the total number of applicants as there were 25 applications the district received after the job was posted by a board member last December.

-Karen Herman was introduced as the new head of finance.

St. Frances Cabrini 4th graders roll out historic Wax Museum

A nice turnout Wednesday afternoon at St. Frances Cabrini as neighbors looked for a history fix.

In attendance were film maker Walt Disney, inventor Thomas Edison, and strong women like Sacagawea, Jacqueline Kennedy, Princess Diana and Louis Braille.

Miss Tanking’s 4th grade class held its annual Wax Museum history display. Students picked a noteworthy person in history and conducted months of research.

Wednesday was the big reveal with tri-fold displays and historic reenactments. Some of the Wax Museum displays featured American author Helen Keller and fabled Johnny Appleseed.

Updates & tidbits

– Drake University senior Meghan Walters of West Bend has been offered a prestigious 2018–2019 Fulbright Scholarship. With her acceptance to the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant program in Bulgaria, she joins a lengthy list of Bulldogs to have been offered the Fulbright scholarship.

– Mai Fest is coming to Friedenfeld Park in Germantown on May 18, 19 and 20. There will be fantastic beers, fabulous music and dancing and good old-fashioned fun. There will be food from Schwai’s Fish Friday (Friday night only), Germantown Kiwanis Club, Brats, Frankfurters, Hamburgers, and Potato Pancakes. Come enjoy the fun.

-The Downtown West Bend Association is gearing up for the 6th annual Banner ArtWalk. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art on Saturday, May 12.

– The 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is at Gehring View Farms this year, 4630 Highway 83 in Hartford. The host family will be Eugene and Christine Gehring and their family Derik, Jordan and Emily. This year’s Breakfast will be Saturday, June 9, rain or shine.

-Moraine Park Technical College’s student senate is hosting a free public event with Green Bay Packer legend Jerry Kramer. Students, staff, and community members are invited to the Fond du Lac campus commons area, on Tuesday, April 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., to listen to the two-time Super Bowl champion’s story. Kramer was recently announced as an inductee into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Holy Angels School recognizes alum Gayle (Juech) Ritter                            By Mike Sternig

As part of the annual celebration of Catholic Schools Week each year, Holy Angels School recognizes past students with the National Catholic Educational Association’s Distinguished Graduate Award.

The school’s mission statement begins with the words: “We belong to a Catholic community which gathers together to proclaim the gospel, serve others and praise God.”

This year’s distinguished graduate was not available during the January celebration which delayed the presentation until this past weekend. The 2018 award recipient is Gayle (Juech) Ritter, a member of the Class of 1970.

Principal Mike Sternig noted, “Gayle has certainly embodied our mission statement by her service to others. She has been affiliated for the past 25 years with a charitable organization called MEDICO (Medical Eye Dental International Care Organization) which serves the impoverished population in Honduras. She has accomplished volunteer work in remote villages throughout that Central American nation.  Much of this volunteer work has focused on assisting the dentists and optometrists in the field as well as providing post-surgical rehabilitation to patients that have suffered severe injuries as a result of working on the banana and coffee plantations.”

The Distinguished Graduate and her husband have been the group leaders for several groups consisting of between 8 to 25 volunteer members and have most recently traveled to the Mosquito Coast which is in the southeastern region of the country and is a desolate and remote jungle-like area inhabited by mostly indigenous tribes.

In 1998, she was a part of a delegation of medical volunteers to provide medical care to those who suffered injuries from Hurricane Mitch, one of the deadliest hurricanes to hit the Western Hemisphere in more than 200 years. Additionally, she has provided care and therapy to children and adults alike suffering from a myriad of disabilities.

This husband and wife team has made several interactive presentations to the students of Holy Angels regarding their volunteer trips and they have been the encouragement for students to become involved with serving others through outreach efforts.

Regarding her formation at Holy Angels, Ritter made it clear, “My Catholic education has instilled a strong foundation of empathy, care, and compassion for the less fortunate members of both our local and international community.”

Around the Bend bu Judy Steffes

Rumors are hot about a new store for Fleet Farm in West Bend

If you leave Fleet Farm in West Bend these days most neighbors will say “an employee told them that a new Fleet Farm will be built soon.”

There’s also word from the same unnamed employee that “ground will be broken soon on a new Fleet Farm in West Bend.”

The long-rumor activity of a new Fleet Farm in West Bend dates to 2004 when Fleet Farm announced it was going to build ‘the largest store in the state’ on a 30-acre parcel along Highway 33 and County Highway Z.

The Mills brothers also acquired 40 adjacent acres and plans were on track for a 274,000-square-foot store.

In January 2016, the Mills family sold its business to New York-based investment firm KKR.

In the first quarter of the year, KKR met with store managers. This is the message passed along, “We anticipate investing significantly in the business adding infrastructure, stores and local jobs,” said Nate Taylor, then with the retail portion of KKR.

Over the next 13 years, nothing was built. But now the rumor mill is churning fast…. and there maybe some news waiting in the wings.

Some businesses along Highway 33 west have claimed there’s been activity on some of the land owned by Fleet Farm. A call to Elaine Johnson at the DNR confirmed that ‘yes’ there was some soil sampling about a month ago, but that was for the incoming Morrie’s Honda dealership and that property is adjacent to the 40 acres Fleet owns.

Johnson’s note is below. She answered whether someone from Fleet or KKR is sniffing around to finally build.

As requested, I checked our records for waterways and wetlands projects located in Section 16, Township 11N, Range 19E in the City of West Bend, Washington County.

Apart from the recent 2018 wetland fill application and wetland delineation for the proposed Honda dealership, our most recent record after that starts in 2012. In other words, apart from the Honda dealership, the Waterways and Wetlands Program hasn’t reviewed any projects in this area for the last 5-6 years or so. That said, we do not have any applications in for a proposed Fleet Farm or Olive Garden (or other development).  Thank you, Elaine Johnson

Water Management Specialist (Kenosha, Washington and Walworth counties)  Division of External Services  Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

“However, checking a bit closer to home City Administrator Jay Shambeau confirmed the new owners of Fleet Farm have reached out. “Yes, the city has been having conversations with the new ownership of Fleet Farm,” said Shambeau following Monday night’s council meeting.

“We’ve been staying in contact with them, although they’re not moving forward with any type of design or development proposal at this time.”

A conversation Tuesday with officials at the corporate office of Fleet Farm were friendly and brief and noncommittal regarding any sort of development in West Bend.

On a final note, a spokesperson from Fleet Farm Corporate promised if Fleet Farm decides to build a new store in West Bend they will make the announcement first on WashingtonCountyInsider.com  Stay tuned.

Wax Museum at St. Frances Cabrini School

Fourth grade students at St. Frances Cabrini School in West Bend are hosting their Wax Museum event on Wednesday, April 11 from 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. in the multi-purpose room.  Some of the students shot promo videos to help inform neighbors about the free event. Ashlyn Fortney chose to speak about Malala Yousafzia, but she’s really excited to hear about another well-known figure in U.S. history. Some of the other people of note will include George Washington, Johnny Appleseed and Walt Disney. The event is free and open to the public.

Green Bay Packer Tailgate Tour in West Bend on Saturday, April 14

The Green Bay Packers 13th Annual Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour, will be in West Bend on Saturday, April 14 from 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., at the West Bend High School Fieldhouse.  One hundred percent of the proceeds for the event will benefit the Threshold, Inc. Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Kenny Clark, Blake Martinez, and Ty Montgomery, and Packers alumni Rob Davis, Antonio Freeman and Bubba Franks.

Ticket sale locations:  Threshold – 600 Rolfs Avenue, West Bend, Associated Bank – 715 W. Paradise Drive, West Bend and the West Bend Area Chamber of Commerce – 304 S. Main Street, West Bend.

Tailgate party ticket prices:  $40 all-inclusive ticket (only 600 available) – Includes food, giveaways, Q&A sessions and autographs of all seven celebrities (bring one item per person or use Packers’ giveaway item) and $10 ticket general admission ticket – Includes access to the Q&A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverages will be available for purchase.

Outdoor dining deck to be added to former Dublin’s

It’s a story you will see first at WashingtonCountyInsider.com as plans have been submitted to add a second-story outdoor dining area at the former Dublin’s restaurant, 110 Wisconsin Street, in West Bend. The proposed deck will extend off the west side of the building and include an exterior set of stairs to the patio below.

The former tenant, Dublin’s, closed at the end of March after the owners moved out of state.

On Monday afternoon a trailer full of chairs was seen exiting the property. The exterior signs had also been removed. The interior is getting a fresh coat of paint and a thorough cleaning is in the works.

According to Mark A. Piotrowicz, Assistant Director Department of Development with the City of West Bend, said a site plan was needed and not just a permit for the deck. “This is a commercial enterprise and the plans are changing the appearance of the structure and it will require site plan approval,” he said.

The West Bend Plan Commission will have to review the proposal. While the next meeting is April 10, the deck will not be on that agenda. Piotrowicz said it looks like the earliest the Plan Commission will review the site plan is in May.

One other caveat is The Museum of Wisconsin Art has an agreement with the City of West Bend that allows MOWA to comment. “It’s part of MOWA’s development agreement,” said Piotrowicz.  “If the item is located in specific boundaries surrounding MOWA and this site plan will go to them and they have an opportunity to comment before Plan Commission reviews.”

In the past MOWA has reviewed plans for Affiliated Clinical and QUAM Engineering.

According to building owners Kevin and Amy Zimmer there is a contract in place for a new owner to move in and that should close in June.

Washington County teen Attends 2018 National 4-H Conference  By Amy Mangan-Fischer  

Wisconsin’s delegation to National 4-H Conference in Washington, DC, will join 300 youth and adults from around the country to share ideas and form recommendations in guiding future national 4-H youth development programs in their communities.

Wisconsin delegates attending the conference April 7-12, 2018 include: Bridget Dean, Washington Co., Tyler Franklin, St. Croix Co., Joelle Heller, Waukesha Co., Brianna Jones, Waukesha Co., Veronica Klenke, Chippewa Co., Allison Olson, Eau Claire Co., Linnea Tabaka, Green Co., Sydney Tone, Dane Co., and Camron VanLoo, Fond du Lac Co. Sarah Tarjeson, Sheboygan County Youth Development Educator and Joshua Chrest, Pierce County volunteer will accompany the group as their Adult Advisors.

Conference includes workshops and other activities that emphasize civic engagement, youth-adult partnerships and professional development. During roundtable discussions and a town hall meeting, delegates will share ideas and form recommendations for the future of 4-H.

While in Washington D.C., delegates will meet with their state legislators during Capitol Hill Day to represent youth from Wisconsin and discuss state 4-H programs with Congressional members and their staff.

In 1927, the USDA implemented the first National 4-H Camp/Conference. Known as the “Secretary’s Conference,” the National 4-H Conference continues to be the major annual youth development event for USDA. Wisconsin 4-H Foundation provides financial support for the Wisconsin delegation.

A note of ‘thanks’ to WBPD Lt. Duane Farrand

The West Bend Common Council took a moment during its Monday night meeting to honor Lt. Duane Farrand for 27 years with the West Bend Police Department.

“This feels great,” said Farrand.”

Farrand will turn 50 years old on April 9 and he will retire on April 10. Farrand started his career as a police dispatcher with the Germantown Police Department. After nine months he joined the West Bend PD.

“When I started in West Bend Jim Skidmore was Chief of Police,” Farrand said.

Other chiefs included James Schwartz, Whitey Uelmen, and Ken Meuler.

“When I started we had French blue uniforms with gray pants and we had Stetson hats,” said Farrand. “It was great in the summer time and when it rained it was great but they were very cumbersome.”

The squads were V8s and there was no traction control. “Very different from today,” he said.

Farrand was also with the department when it was on the corner of Highway 33 and Main Street. “We were upstairs and the Fire Department was downstairs,” he said. “I remember our booking was actually a closet and we’d open the door and it would have a swing out board and we’d thumbtack the suspect’s name and booking number and we’d take a Polaroid of them.”

Farrand said he wasn’t sure what he would do in retirement. He said he will still be active on the Deer Management Committee. His advice to incoming officers, “Take care of your community and your community will take care of you.”

Updates & tidbits

-The Gift of Giving fundraiser is April 7 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at King Pin Bowl and Ale House, 1022 S. Main Street in West Bend. Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse is a nonprofit charity organization that was formed when Amanda Hartwig’s family experienced the loss of their 10-month-old son, Bo. “We had nowhere to turn for grief support and aid for mental anguish,” she said.

– Help support the Fillmore Fire & Rescue during the annual Fish Fry on Friday, April 13 at the Fillmore Fire Department. 8485 Trading Post Trail Road. Serving begins at 5 p.m.  Bring a non-perishable food item and get a free dessert.

– Les Belles Voix, the Advanced Women’s Choir at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, under the direction of Karen Wysocky, will be presenting a concert at Holy Hill Basilica on Friday, April 13 at 7 p.m.

– The West Bend Police Department annual Spring Bike Sale will be Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 8 a.m. There are 95 bikes for sale with a majority in good condition. The sale will be on the north end of West Bend City Hall, 1115 S. Main Street.  The bikes are sold “as is” and all sales are final. No warranty, refunds, or exchanges. All bikes are $20, which includes a bike license. Yes all bikes will be sold with a bike license. CASH ONLY.

-Les Belles Voix, the Advanced Women’s Choir at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, under the direction of Karen Wysocky, will be presenting a concert at Holy Hill Basilica on Friday, April 13 at 7 p.m.

-The Downtown West Bend Association is gearing up for the 6th annual Banner ArtWalk. Fifty hand-painted banners will be on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art on Saturday, May 12.

– The 31st annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is at Gehring View Farms this year, 4630 Highway 83 in Hartford. The host family will be Eugene and Christine Gehring and their family Derik, Jordan and Emily. This year’s Breakfast will be Saturday, June 9, rain or shine.

-Moraine Park Technical College’s student senate is hosting a free public event with Green Bay Packer legend Jerry Kramer. Students, staff, and community members are invited to the Fond du Lac campus commons area, on Tuesday, April 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., to listen to the two-time Super Bowl champion’s story. Kramer was recently announced as an inductee into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

-UW-Washington County men’s basketball coach Stephen Murphy was named the 2018 Wisconsin Collegiate Conference Coach of the Year.

-Slinger Public Library will host State of Craft Beer author and photographer Matthew Janzen on Monday, April 9 from 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. as he guides neighbors on a vivid tour of Wisconsin’s craft beer industry.

– Moraine Park Technical College students, Jose Bustos of Fond du Lac and Queenie Weesen of West Bend, were recently recognized by Wisconsin Campus Compact, an association that recognizes those who have shown excellence in civic engagement. Bustos was the winner of the Jack Keating Student Civic Leadership Award, recognizing students that have taken a leadership role in creating change in their community. Weesen was the recipient of the Newman Civic Fellows Award, recognizing community-committed students who look to create long-term social change. Weesen is a current nursing student at Moraine Park.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Dublin’s to close March 31

There’s been some rumbling around West Bend the past few weeks regarding the future of Dublin’s, 110 Wisconsin Street.

On Wednesday afternoon those rumblings were confirmed as Dublin’s owner Todd Ceman said they are closing the Irish pub at the end of the month.

“My wife Jamie relocated and accepted a job in California,” said Ceman. “It was too good of a job to pass up.  She moved in the early part of February and I moved with her and that unfortunately left Dublin’s and I was unable to continue running it from California.”

Ceman said they looked at a couple different options to possibly pass the business along to employees but “unfortunately the stars did not align.”

“Yes, the business is closing but not out of distress,” Ceman said.  “This is really a bittersweet decision. There was a lot of work effort and we made a lot of friends, consistent customers and I will miss this a lot.”

Ceman wanted to make sure to recognize his great staff. “They have been my rock for the last four-and-a-half years. They’re the highest levels of integrity and they’re the reason people patronized the business,” he said.

Ceman runs the business in partnership with Dave and Kristin Toman; the couples have two other restaurants in Oshkosh. He said those establishments will remain open.

“The employees are OK with all this. They’re extremely awesome but they are sad about the closing,” Ceman said.

Shelby Neelis is a server and bartender at Dublin’s. “Todd Ceman is one of the best bosses we could have asked for, we’re sorry to see him move to California but all his employees are going to stick it out until the end,” she said.

Jordan Zeitler is a bartender/ server at Dublin’s. “I was sad when I heard but we appreciate everything Todd has done for us here; we all care about him,” he said.

Customers were shocked to hear the news. “I had one lady say ‘I’m going to just go out and recommend this place to all my customers’ and I appreciated that but this is it,” Zeitler said.

When employees found out, Neelis said everybody was sad. “Unfortunately it’s not going to stay open just for us but at the same time we’re happy as long as Todd is happy,” she said. “He’s been there through thick and thin with us and he knows all our names and we know he cares about us.”

The atmosphere and the 40 beers on tap is what Neelis said was a big draw and helped make Dublin’s a success.

Neelis said the building has been a mainstay in the community. She remembered the train through the rafters and the popcorn machine in the entry when it was The Binkery.  (and the head in the upstairs window)

Kelly Jordan of West Bend has been coming to Dublin’s since it opened and before that she patronized The Binkery. “I really liked the Irish food here and the old building,” said Jordan. “We’d come off the Eisenbahn bike trail and have lunch outside. This has always been a wonderful place to sit and have dinner and take mom and have an Irish beverage and Irish meal after work.”

Marlene Jennings of Slinger said she loved coming to Dublin’s. “I would look forward to spring and summer on the patio and my Irish whisky,” she said.

The Dublin’s name is owned by Ceman. For people with Dublin’s gift certificates, Ceman said those will be accepted in Oshkosh.

The owner of the building is Kevin and Amy Zimmer. So far the couple has no comment on the future of the location. On an editorial note, if anyone is familiar with the Zimmers and their connections it’s likely the building will not sit empty for long.

Dublin’s last day will be Saturday, March 31, 2018.

On a history note:  It was Sept. 15, 2009 when the former Binkery was moved from W. Washington Street to Wisconsin Street in downtown West Bend. There was a slow-moving parade to the east.

Sharpshooters may be next step for deer management in West Bend

Three months after the city of West Bend tried using bow hunters to trim the deer population the Deer Management Committee is regrouping to discuss Plan B.

On Monday, March 26 the committee will talk about using sharpshooters for deer management. During a five-day test program for deer management in West Bend in January 2018, five bow hunters killed a total of three deer. Their goal was 40.

Now the Deer Management Committee is regrouping. Sharpshooters have been discussed in the past. Some of the concerns were cost and safety. Tom Isaac with the DNR presented some details during a meeting in August 2016.

Bullet points (pun intended) include:

-The average park size in West Bend is 14 acres up to 140 acres.

-Options to control deer include sterilization, sharpshooters, and trapping.

-Mayor Kraig Sadownikow said the ultimate goal is to manage the herd. Another suggested option was to get volunteers to qualify as sharpshooters and maybe close a park for 2-3 days to try and solve the problem.

In 2009 in neighboring Ozaukee County officials in the City of Mequon brought in sharpshooters for $11,000 to help cull the deer herd by 100. According to a report from the Parks Director the sharpshooters used bait, shot the deer from tree stands at night while the park was closed.

Monday’s meeting in the Conference Room at West Bend City Hall is open to the public and begins at 5:30 p.m.

On a side note – Hallway conversation in 2016: After the meeting some of the neighbors in attendance talked about the huge problem of deer in their yards on Deer Ridge Drive. One suggestion that helped keep deer from destroying plants was Irish Spring soap.

Can Washington Co. Clerk work elections if spouse is running for office?

The question has come up in several instances in Washington County with regard to the April 3 election and whether it is legit that candidates and their spouses can work the polls.

This election Justin Reichert is running for District 3 alderman in West Bend. Reichert’s wife, Ashley, is the Washington County Clerk who oversees the election results. Reichert said it is perfectly kosher for her to complete her job on Election Day because the poll duties are completely separate from her husband’s municipal race.

“I’m only providing the supplies and the general support to oversee the election,” said Ashley Reichert.  “I’m not the filing officer for that position; the filing officer is the city of West Bend and I’m completely removed from all of that.”

Reichert said the database programs at the county are hired out so there’s complete separation.

Canvassing, also for those municipal races happens at the municipal level.

“I only canvass county races, state and federal so I’m completely removed from that,” she said.

Reichert said a county clerk is also an elected position and if her name were on the ballot she would recuse herself from the canvass.

Reid Magney is the public information officer with the Wisconsin Elections Commission.

“If you’re using the example of Justin Reichert, he was required to submit nomination papers to the city clerk and not the county clerk,” he said.

“When a decision is made on reviewing the required number of signatures to run for office, that decision is made by the city clerk and not the county clerk.

“When they put together the ballot the city clerk determines the order the names are on the ballot and not the county clerk.”

Magney said the county clerk does print the ballot but the information comes from the city clerk.

“When it comes to counting the ballots the county clerk has nothing to do with that because it’s a municipal office and it only goes up as high as that office,” he said. “There’s a municipal board of canvassers that will double check the results after the election but that information never goes to a county board of canvassers.

“The county board of canvassers will only deal with county races and state races in this election so she won’t have anything to do with the counting of the votes,” Magney said. “There is absolutely no issue in an election like this.”

Location announced for Eaton’s Fresh Pizza in West Bend

In February we announced Eaton’s Pizza would be returning to West Bend. The franchise owner was coming in from Fond du Lac.  According to the owner Eaton’s Fresh Pizza will be located at 830 E. Paradise Drive. That’s in the strip mall across from Blue Dog Golf Course.

The owner is looking at a target opening date of July 1. He said he will need about 10 employees. Watch for upcoming job postings at WashingtonCountyInsider.com

Brenda Hetebrueg joins Horicon Bank in West Bend

Horicon Bank is pleased to announce Brenda Hetebrueg has joined their team in West Bend as a Branch Manager. Originally from West Bend, Hetebrueg comes to Horicon Bank with over 30 years of banking experience. After graduating West Bend East High School, Hetebrueg earned several banking diplomas, including one from the American Institute of Banking School.

She started her career in banking as a teller, and later became a teller supervisor, Branch Operations Service Manager and Bank Officer. Hetebrueg is an active member of the West Bend community. She currently serves as a board member for Roots and Branches as well as Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County.

As a branch manager, Hetebrueg said she enjoys building relationships with her customers.

“I love working with customers – being able to help them with their financial needs,” said Hetebrueg. “As a branch manager, that also means mentoring and empowering my team in West Bend to do the same.”

Hetebrueg said she enjoys this role at Horicon Bank because of the bank’s philosophy toward the community. “I enjoy working for a community bank,” she said. “I am amazed how much we contribute back to the community. Our vision is all about our customers, community and employees – to enjoy working together to make lives better and more secure.

Advisory referendum question on April 3 ballot in West Bend

There will be four questions on an advisory referendum on the April 3 ballot for taxpayers in the city of West Bend. All questions are intended to gauge the interest of taxpayers and how critical they feel it is to spend more money on roads.

Dist. 5 alderman Rich Kasten – West Bend

-Advisory referendum and road maintenance. How to finance road repair and road fixes.

-Remember to vote on all four questions. All four are Yes / No questions

-First two questions talk about increasing property taxes

-Question 3 deals with a wheel tax – this tax can only be used for transportation and road type issues

-No. 4 is to ask Washington County to share 25% of their sales tax with all municipalities.

-Washington County reps have so far said – that will not happen.

-Three major road fixes include 7th Avenue, 18th Ave from Vogt to Paradise and Main Street south of Humar and each project is $5 million.

-$20 wheel tax would be added on at the state level

-How do you sunset the tax – we don’t have a true sunset.

-Anticipated revenue on vehicle registration fee is $600,000 a year applied to borrowing

-Total debt now at city of West Bend is $50 million – down from $80 million six or seven years ago.

Updates & tidbits

The Washington County Fair is coming up July 24 – 29 and notice went out this morning about when word will be released regarding headliners at the Silver Lining Amphitheatre.

-The City of West Bend is proud to announce Albiero Plumbing as Business of the Year. Join us at the award presentation: Wednesday, April 4 at 5 p.m. Albiero Plumbing · HVAC 1940 N. Main Street, West Bend

-The Gift of Giving fundraiser is April 7 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at King Pin Bowl and Ale House, 1022 S. Main Street in West Bend. Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse is a nonprofit charity organization that was formed when Amanda Hartwig’s family experienced the loss of their 10-month-old son, Bo. “We had nowhere to turn for grief support and aid for mental anguish,” she said.

– The West Bend Police Department annual Spring Bike Sale will be Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 8 a.m. There are 95 bikes for sale with a majority in good condition. The sale will be on the north end of West Bend City Hall, 1115 S. Main Street.  The bikes are sold “as is” and all sales are final. No warranty, refunds, or exchanges. All bikes are $20, which includes a bike license. Yes all bikes will be sold with a bike license. CASH ONLY.

West Bend School Board candidate forum

Four candidates vying for two seats on the West Bend School Board participated in a candidate forum this week at West Bend City Hall. Two candidates will be elected to fill two seats on the West Bend School Board. Election Day is Tuesday, April 3.

Kurt Rebholz – son of two public school teachers, went to UW-Stevens Point, worked at Amity Leather, lived her 24 years, has two kids, my kids got a wonderful education here, business owner, hired a lot of students, have passion for community, lets reverse trend of 400 kids leaving the district, let’s hire a superintendent.

Monte Schmiege – in last three years I’m the most senior member of current board, bachelors degree, worked at WB Company and Regal Ware, three adult children, volunteered at Good Shepherd Lutheran and with Habitat for Humanity, treasurer of board and policy chairman, I’m engaged with work on the board, most important aspect is teaching and learning, what’s being taught and how effectively, district has many great things going for it,

Mary Weigand – attended school board meetings for years, current member of CFAC and served on human growth and development committee, have a vast knowledge of curriculum, home schooled children, US Naval academy in 2005 they went away from celestial navigation to GPS and 10 years later went back to celestial navigation. We in WBSD have lost our course and I often hear education needs to change to fix the 21st century. Run for school board and say ‘talk about curriculum’ because that’s the meat and potatoes of education.

Chris Zwygart – chief legal officer at WB Mutual and there for 23 years, I help manage our board of directors and also board on St. Joseph’s Hospital and proud of that work. I’m running because we have a fantastic school system and they wanted to establish a public school foundation and we researched how that would be done and under management of several great boards raised several million dollars. What a gem we have in the community. It’s one of the few areas where if we do our job well, everybody wins. Better educated children means better educated workers. We have challenges with superintendent and facilities. I want to help and I have the skills to help.

Address challenges of declining enrollment

MS – the district could improve the education because that can attract parents and families. Maintain a solid financial footing in the district and don’t want to blow up our budget. In the near future we need to look at facilities and make it possible for growth where needed and attract families.

MW – the district motto is we are a destination. If that’s so – we need to set ourselves apart – the choice to use common core standards is a mistake. Parents in Slinger, Mequon and WB say they can’t understand the new math. If we want to be a destination we could work to stabilize curriculum and local communities can set their own standards. That could set us apart. The white privilege test did not help this district.

CZ – need to take a look at demographics and how many children we expect in the future. Partner with city and council and what can we do to attract new citizens to the area. How do we differentiate ourselves – I spoke with a 9th grader about journalism and I noted these were not classes offered to me. It’s amazing the different opportunities we have. We have scale on our side to offer attractive classes. We need to work on our reputation. It’s undeserved but true – we need to make sure as a school board that we don’t micromanage. That creates distrust.  Let’s look why they are school choicing out.

KR – Student school choicing out to Slinger and Kewaskum. What are they doing better than we are? Let’s work to draw more families to the community. We need to promote school district and hire a good superintendent. We have an outstanding curriculum and promote trades education. This used to be a manufacturing town. We need a trades renaissance. Controversy drives teachers away. Curriculum changes – that’s controversy, that’s makes student leave. Let’s promote the good school system, and community we are.

Is a board member a representative of the community or as a representative of the school system and why

MW – hard to differentiate between the two. I have friends and neighbors and colleagues that send kids to schools here. As a SB member my job is to advocate for the school district. I’m a hard worker and love to research. I talked to a 3rd grader – her words were, “I get to learn cursive.” She said, “Her teacher got them all cursive handwriting books and none of the others are learning cursive.” I thought how great that was. I would push for more kids to learn cursive. I don’t know I can separate between community and school system.

CZ – school system is asset of the community. Answer is both. One of toughest jobs is the community isn’t always aligned in their views. It’s important to listen and set personal bias aside. We need to focus on what we do best – we act as listeners and advocates in the community. Important to navigate and that 100% won’t be aligned

KR – first is to be a rep of school system. So many businesses that want to support and we can expand and save tax dollars with public/private partnerships. We need to get behind the students and learning even if they aren’t going to college.

MS – a school board member is a rep of the community. You’re elected to work and guide the entire school district. Work with the superintendent to set the vision and establish goals. Working with the superintendent and you have to balance between the community and the school district. You need to collaborate and represent all parties. Parents, families and children are foremost.

How to attract and retain teachers and future leaders

CZ – critical issue. We need to attract, recruit and retain quality staff. Our reputation is not great and it’s unfortunate because we live in an era of social media but ironically so many of those opinions are captured on the permanent internet. When trying to attract a new superintendent or teacher they will surf the net. I don’t know they’ll like what they see. Compensation is important and we need a model to attract and recruit and retain good workers.

KR – we have great teachers in the school system. We need to stop them from leaving. Some great teachers and admin left for Slinger. We made a bad superintendent hire and we don’t have three of top admin and that creates uncertainty. We need a good superintendent that knows the students. Superintendent needs to be active in the community. If we have a great leader we stop the flow out and create atmosphere of teamwork

MS – in 2016 statistics from DPI our teacher force at WB is a bit more experienced and more degrees than average for the state. We have rather low turnover compared to other areas of the state and we also had a study that our compensation is in the top range relative to other districts. Some of those things need to be looked at again. Competitive compensation. We also have to establish good culture within our schools and teacher engagement. We need to have a superintendent who can work from the top down. Bring in good administrators and build a good system. The community is attractive and have manufacturing, businesses and stores.

MW – if I were a teacher it would be important to me to have clear expectation with benefits, salary, and classroom conduct. Having clear expectations helps. In our budget drivers is a provision that teachers and staff meet – it will meet what the others pay and we are in the top 5% in teacher salary. The superintendent we hire – it’s a juggling act and we need a solid leader and clearly spell it out.

What school district should WB most resemble?

KR – Slinger is run well top to bottom. They’re smart and recruited some of our admin and teachers. There are things we could do to emulate others. Tax benefit wise – 30 – 40% of school districts take advantage of energy performance contracts. These cost-saving measures for energy improvements.  We need to emulate what other districts are doing.

MS – I compare WB with Neenah, Wisconsin. We’re fairly comparable. Need to consider factors. Size we’re comparable to Neenah. When I look at budget – there are similarities. To some extent comparing us to a district like Slinger or Kewaskum it’s like comparing apples and oranges. When you look at HS we have great CTE program and AP classes. We are offering many good things with arts and music and athletic programs.

MW – my brother in law is the finance admin in Wisconsin Rapids. I think we have a better school district here. At cost per student in Slinger they spend less per student than WB and I think there is a perception that Slinger School District is more conservative than WB.

CZ – we’re a unique community. This has to work for our own community. We can look at other district for better ideas. Other reason this is important to identify. We want the best and brightest ideas to fit here.

District employees and taxpayers – how to choose between the two

MS – the budget is somewhat limited by the revenue limits so you have to work within that budget or you will have to bring up an operational referendum. We are working well within our budget. Between employees and taxpayers – we have to consider what’s needed for the employees. We have to be competitive and meet or exceed the market. What’s happened with Act 10 the old structures and now different districts have different formulas. We would need regular repeated studies to help fit within our revenue limit. We need to keep in mind the repairs needed and we don’t budget ourselves into the corner.

MW – we have budget drivers and the staffing portion is 70%. The budget drivers are a nice tool and the board evaluates them frequently. Decisions for anything else we should make data-driven decisions. At some point the board needs to lead and it’s a juggling act between valuing people’s input and using data for decision. There have been energy savings implemented and Johnson Controls helped implement many energy savings and that’s been a great asset.

CZ – as I’ve talked to taxpayers – why would angry taxpayers show up at a school board meeting? The perception we’re raising taxes and wasting money and the other is we have administrators leaving. That comes down to budget. We need to deal with them with transparency. I think teachers understand budgetary constraints. Don’t work in isolation as a school board

KR – I’m a fiscal conservative and a supporter of WBSD. Taxpayer – we’re a conservative community and want to hold taxes down. I have some good fiscal ideas. Dave Ross has done a good job but we can help with energy contracts. There are facility improvements with an energy performance contract. An $80 million budget need to put resources to attract and retain good teachers.

Changes in school curriculum

MW – Common core was adopted without board approval. The English language arts will be approved next winter. Looking at advanced 8th grade and I see it’s supposed to be with good literature with character building and teach values and vocabulary. This curriculum is 180 school days and has 40 days on sustainability of U.S. food supply.  The love of learning is being sucked out of our students.  We can’t teach everything – we need to choose the best curriculum. There’s so much good stuff out there.

CZ – it is absolutely true that school board oversee curriculum. I can’t imagine the state thought we’re going to take a group of part time people and appoint them the arbitrator. It would be absurd for teachers to obtain permission from the board. We should not turn curriculum into a political football. I’m passionate about this. We employ experts. We should oversee the process and that it’s working but leave the curriculum to the experts.

KR – I agree with Chris. We’re first to none in advanced curriculum. Curriculum can’t be a controversial topic. We’re a public school system and curriculum can’t be chosen on what books are good or bad. This drives teachers and students away. We need to have a cohesive school district.

MS – leaving curriculum to the experts – the experts are the liberal professors in the liberal universities in the non-government organizations that drive the choices of curriculum that are passed down to states and school districts. That is what some people object to what they finally find out – like the privilege test what’s going on. A teacher chose to use a test compatible to engage New York curriculum. When you leave the curriculum to the experts this is what you’re getting – I would agree with Mr. Zwygert that you can guide the selection of curriculum – but change happens fast .

How to stress accountability – who is accountable to the school board and how do you measure performance

CZ – accountability can be a scary concept. School board interacts with the superintendent and that’s where the accountability lies. IN private industry that can be shared responsibility. A board member has to work with the superintendent. The next choice is critical. The school board works with the superintendent.

KR – how we’re measure on accountability and performance. Can we reduce the trend of students leaving. That’s a measurable action to measure success. Board actions to help that. Board unity. I was part of superintendent search committee. It’s a serious decision to hire the next superintendent. Is the longest serving the way to have a school board in WB. I want to support unity and a positive direction. We need to compromise, be accountable to the superintendent and be judged on how we attract students.

MS – superintendent is the only employee of the school board. I’ve been working behind the scenes to collect sample evaluation instruments for the superintendent. We tried a superintendent evaluation last year and it was bumbling along. Before that – in my experience – we didn’t do much evaluating of the superintendent. We have to have strategic goals and the board needs to monitor performance. Thinking of a dashboard where the superintendent presents to the board with where the district stands on certain parameters. Mr. Neitzke had a bulletin board with facts and we need something that puts the data before the board.

MW – the board oversees the superintendent and the super oversees the admin. The school board is accountable to state law and the community – one thing we’ve seen is the lack of transparency. Recently every meeting hasn’t been taped – lately the admin and the board decided not to tape it. We’re accountable to the community. At the superintendent search and Dave in charge of HR and we talked about the pyramid and there is a protocol.

How does school board work to prepare HS student for college or technical training or workforce training

KR – our board needs to help students whether they choose college or trades path. That’s a passion of mine where I believe let’s promote more advance placement classes. Our community is concerned about trades education. Local companies have helped promote trades education. As a business owner I’d like to promote and bring more community resources in and enhance the curriculum.

MS- we want to have as wide a variety of options available. We have students getting college credits in HS, AP courses, CTE and well supported by the community. Different companies provide equipment. In seventh and 8th grade the students can get credits for H.S.  There are a wide range of opportunities and we need to have a strong counseling program.

MW – change in recent years that students don’t need to go to college. Not everyone will do that and I like the change that’s happening with trades and technical school. We can do a better job informing kids that these are really good jobs. We can encourage students to get out of school in three years and I’d like to open that environment. That’s a really valid aspect.

CZ – take a look at school board’s mission statement. College readiness and career success. If they want to go directly into a career the student will be prepared under both scenarios. We have the scale to offer unique classes and we’re doing more with regard to trades. Anything we can do to bring more community resources in. We can train students to earn a fantastic wage in a trade and we need to encourage that. Use our size and scale to distinguish ourselves.

Social media – how do you improve the situation?

MS – Social media has somewhat subsided. Not sure how relevant that question is. We do have a communications person in the district who is working with a consultant to improve the communications aspect. We did a communications audit. Long process to get that going. We’re working on it. We need to have positive communications coming out of the district about the achievements and successes and we need to respond to complaints or objections that arise. We need to respond to that readily and a communications person would help in that area.

MW – not aware of anything with social media. Communication is the key. Talking to parents – from individual schools the communication is good. If parents are communicated with by the parents or teachers. The district office needs to work on that more from the top. Transparency. Everyone should have access and openness

CZ – do something to do what we can to avoid controversy. There will always be unusual controversy. We need to social media and use it as an advantage. Why are we seeing that. We need to promote and tell the truth. That’s simple. Tie into transparency and communication because if you don’t communicate there’s a different version of the truth. Transparency. Social media record stays out there a long time.

KR – positive and negative social media. Sometimes it’s self inflicted. We haven’t had an effective leader for multiple years. The teacher hasn’t felt they’ve had a good leader. School curriculum and challenging teachers and that brings negative social media. Once we have a great superintendent in place let’s put a great communication in place. Let’s talk to everyone and tell us how great a district we have.

Why are candidates running in tandem?

MW – when I took out my papers I didn’t know who else was running. I didn’t know the other two at all. Until tonight I didn’t know their views. I would be happy to serve with Monte as we have the same goals and concerns. It’s interesting how that happens.

CZ – when I started I wasn’t sure who would throw their hat in the ring. With regard to the signage – yes, there’s more clustering with Mr. Rebholz. Perhaps it’s intentional. Talked about school as a business and issues like budgets and contracts and there are business concepts to manage district affairs. In addition we’ve heard differing viewpoints. Differences on curriculum and managing teachers. We want to leave curriculum to the experts – that is one of the contributors to why the signs are clustered.

KR – I endorse Chris Zwygert for school board. I knew of Chris by name and he’s of impeccable character. Monte and Mary are great family people and community members. Our sons played together with Mary’s kids. You and Dave have a great family. When I met Monte I really didn’t know you. When you said curriculum was your first choice and policy was your second. I had to work with Chris.

MS – there are curriculum concerns and I’m happy to work with Mary. I think some of our supporters have brought us together. I have utmost respect for all the candidates and what they might bring to the table but clearly there is a difference. Curriculum, for many years, has been left to the ivory tower. I have the utmost respect for our teachers and I attempted to do that with the science and I was not permitted to have a separate work session for discussion.

What is role of School District in regard to vitality of district and how will you accomplish

CZ – economic growth and vitality – this education thing, everybody wins when we do it well. If we can have students well prepared for the workforce, that will help.  It means people with a better education can earn a higher wage. We want to attract people to move to the community. Keep property values high and make sure people are ready to work. It raises the standard of living for everyone

KR – 21st largest school district in the state. We’re a large entity. Retired teachers have encouraged me to run and promote unity.

MS – first responsibility is education of children. College and career ready. Students who go on to college hopefully they will return. Have to have an attractive education and we need employee satisfaction so that keeps the good teachers in the district. There is a strong connection with Moraine Park and UW-WC. If we have a good solid education program then good things happen. WBSD moved up in state report card and now ‘exceed expectations.’

MW – mission of district is to educate kids. We want them to be respectful and have a good work ethic and collaborate with community and schools. We need to let district know we respect parents and parental rights. There are a lot of choices – some home school, online learning, parochial – if we want them to come here we need to make it a destination with solid curriculum that parents can trust and let parents know they’re respected.

When people ask if West Bend is a great school district, what do you say?

KR – I will shout it from the rooftops. More passionate than ever to fix our communication issue. This is a great school district. Let’s reduce the controversy

MS – is WB a good district, Yes. In spite of what people say our teachers are staying more than average and more experienced and more degrees than state average. We have strong programs at the high schools of wide range and career possibilities. Whole range of activities and these are attractive to draw people to the district. Our community is top notch with safety.

MW – being a student from 4th grade on up with the ski team and band and when our kids were school age and our daughter was home schooled the district was wonderful in working with us. She took AP science and they have a great relationship with the community. Our son participated in sports and other son participated in automotive and our daughter is a professional violinist and if someone said – it’s not perfect but if I get on the board I will help make it better.

CZ – this is a district of a larger scale which gives us opportunities. We have quality teachers who care and they sacrifice their own time and go above and beyond. I want to add that we have a school board that’s supportive of the district with a top notch superintendent.

Final remarks

Monte Schmiege – served on board for 3 years. Attended three Wisconsin Association of School Board conferences to increase my knowledge in this area. I spend a lot on school board weekends to review and analyze the packet. I’ve worked hard to get a grasp on board policies. We need solid policies. I’ve delved into school board policies. District has some conservative practices and we would like to continue that. WB could use some longevity on the board.

Mary Weigand – I’m a nurse and I could look at some issues as a nurse in triage. Right now the bleed is the superintendent. We need a good super, and hire some good admin, stabilize the district and communicate with the community. I have a lot of questions I would like to propose to a superintendent candidate. I am a hard worker with community values and I want to restore community values. Board has a responsibility – board doesn’t teach curriculum they approve the curriculum. I want my community better and I desire to hear from more people in the community. Strong solid conservative.

Chris Zwygart – everyone intends the best but we have different approaches. I want to say why I can help – I am an attorney and my job will be to keep the board out of trouble and focused. School finances are difficult and I’m a CPA so if there are issues we can resolve them. I’ve recruited top level execs. With issues like finance and budget and regulation I have the skills needed. With curriculum, there’s talk about this set up by liberal professors – we employ people to review curriculum. This should not be a political football.

Kurt Rebholz – we’re four conservatives sitting and running for school board. Serious issues include hiring a superintendent and saving the community taxpayer dollars and look at the $80 million budget and let’s retain and attract teachers. Let’s not push a curriculum agenda – with school board members with that view we may lose more good teachers. My dad talked to me about good grades – and he praised an A effort. I will give an A.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Major renovation underway at St. Mary’s Parish in Barton

There’s a major renovation underway inside the worship space at St. Mary Immaculate Conception Parish in Barton.

In 2016 repairs were made to the historic steeple and exterior church surfaces. In 2017, the parish completed major updates to the church’s heating and ventilation systems.

Now the parish is working on an interior renovation that includes new paint, new floor surfaces, new upholstery, new statues and statue restoration, new matching high altar, ambo, and altar of sacrifice, sound system upgrade, new exterior main church doors, and parish center lobby restroom updates.

The transformation is well underway and rather shocking if you haven’t been inside the church in a while. One noticeable difference, aside from the scaffolding on the altar, is there are now pews. They’ve all been dismantled. The sides are sitting in a pile and the red cushion seats are in a heap in the back of the church.

“Worthless particle board” said one church volunteer. One would have thought since the church celebrated its 160th anniversary these may have been collector items. “We can’t even give them away” said the volunteer.

There’s an ongoing fundraiser to collect $375,000 to help pay for the renovation. The new interior will look much like the plans below.

Thomas Cullen accepted to West Point Military Academy

Living Word Lutheran High School senior Thomas Cullen has been accepted to West Point Military Academy.

“My mom cried and my dad was very proud,” said the 6-foot-3 Cullen recalling the afternoon he returned home to find his acceptance letter. “I think she was happy but I think she was a little scared too.”

The 17-year-old Cullen started the application process last year and finished it earlier this year. “It was a lot of personal information, essays, awards, honors and I had to get a nomination from Congressman James Sensenbrenner,” he said.

Cullen said he’d always wanted to join the Army and get a world-class education. “I’m an enlisted soldier right now,” he said. “I went to boot camp at Fort Jackson South Carolina over the summer and after I finish West Point I’ll be an officer.”

For the past four years Cullen said Living Word Lutheran has really helped lay a good foundation with education, leadership and guidance. “This is really like a family here; it’s a good student-to-teacher ratio,” he said.

A true student athlete Cullen, who is on National Honor Society and carries a 3.9 GPA, has been active in football, basketball, baseball and wrestling.

He said his athletic ability helped him during boot camp. “We’d wake up at 5:30 a.m., complete an hour of exercise, eat, go to class or to the shooting range for 8 to 10 hours a day,” he said. “The toughest thing was the 12-mile march with 125-pounds in a rucksack; that started at 8 p.m. and ended at 6 a.m. Everything we learned is teaching us to be uncomfortable so when you’re in an uncomfortable situation your performance is better.”

Cullen is a strapping 6-4 and sturdy. An Eagle Scout he knows the commitment of starting a project and following through. For his Eagle Scout badge he built a flag pole behind the concession stand at the high school.

West Point is amazing because of the architecture and the people. “It’s amazing to see 4,000 people marching around in the same uniform every day,” said Cullen.

Cullen will graduate with his class on May 28 and then he will start at West Point the first week in July.

Revamp ahead for Galactic McDonald’s in West Bend

In February the West Bend Plan Commission reviewed and approved a new, updated facade for the Galactic McDonald’s, 1140 S. Main Street.

Now comes word the facade is not the only thing that will be getting a makeover.

Owner Steve Kilian Jr. said the galactic playground will be removed and a new play land with interactive technology will be put in its place.

“The galactic theme will be going away,” said Kilian Jr. “McDonald’s is going with a more modern, contemporary theme. We’re still going to keep a kids play area but it will more relevant to today’s kids.”

Kilian Jr. said there will still be an area for kids to runaround and play.

“There will not be a ball pit but there will be a climbing apparatus within the play land,” said Kilian Jr.

The changes will take place in August.  Kilian Jr. said their goal is to “remain open during construction.”

On a history note: The Galactic McDonald’s first opened Feb. 28, 1996.

“I was there when the special sauce for the Big Mac was mixed at the store and when the Hamburgler crawl thing, bouncy fry girls and metal slides were in the outdoor play land,” Sharon Ruplinger said recalling how they had to shut down the play area when it was “real hot because kids would burn their legs.”

Sign goes up at Pizza Ranch in West Bend

The West Bend Police Department annual Spring Bike Sale will be Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 8 a.m. There are 95 bikes for sale with a majority in good condition.

The sale will be on the north end of West Bend City Hall, 1115 S. Main Street. (north side, between City Hall and the Mutual Mall) Do not come the Police Department entrance, as the sale is on the opposite end of the building. You can park in the City Hall parking lot or the Mutual Mall parking lot.

The bikes are sold “as is” and all sales are final. No warranty, refunds, or exchanges. All bikes are $20, which includes a bike license. Yes all bikes will be sold with a bike license. CASH ONLY.

The license is good for the life of the bike. Bicycles will be sold on a “first come, first serve” basis, and one bicycle per person. For any questions regarding the sale, call Lt. Richard Lucka at (262)335-5012.  Bicycle must be removed by the purchaser from the Police Department immediately following its sale.

Advisory referendum question on April 3 ballot in West Bend

There will be four questions on an advisory referendum on the April 3 ballot for taxpayers in the city of West Bend. All questions are intended to gauge the interest of taxpayers and how critical they feel it is to spend more money on roads.

Dist. 5 alderman Rich Kasten – West Bend

-Advisory referendum and road maintenance. How to finance road repair and road fixes.

-There have been a lot of complaints about roads on social media and phone calls.

-There are mixed messages on how good the roads are

-People are concerned about property taxes

-Best way to determine how to address problem with an advisory referendum

-Remember to vote on all four questions. All four are Yes / No questions

-Truly a fact-finding mission

-First two questions talk about increasing property taxes

-Question 3 deals with a wheel tax – this tax can only be used for transportation and road type issues

-No. 4 is to ask Washington County to share 25% of their sales tax with all municipalities.

-Washington County reps have so far said – that will not happen.

-Three major road fixes include 7th Avenue, 18th Ave from Vogt to Paradise and Main Street south of Humar and each project is $5 million.

-$20 wheel tax would be added on at the state level

-How do you sunset the tax – we don’t have a true sunset.

-Anticipated revenue on vehicle registration fee is $600,000 a year applied to borrowing

-Total debt now at city of West Bend is $50 million – down from $80 million six or seven years ago.

Gift of Giving fundraiser for Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse

The Gift of Giving fundraiser is April 7 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at King Pin Bowl and Ale House, 1022 S. Main Street in West Bend. Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse is a nonprofit charity organization that was formed when Amanda Hartwig’s family experienced the loss of their 10-month-old son, Bo. “We had nowhere to turn for grief support and aid for mental anguish,” she said.

Updates & tidbits

-Courtney Rummel from West Bend is currently on the Toyota U.S. Revolution Tour.  She just took 2nd place in snowboarding.

 – The earliest anyone in Washington County will be able to vote absentee for the upcoming general election is March 19. Election Day is Tuesday, April 3.

– The city of West Bend will spend $10,650 with a Brookfield firm to do a traffic count and signal-timing project on a stretch of Paradise Drive that runs from Seventh Avenue to 18th Avenue.

– The Washington County Fair Park will be celebrating this St. Patrick’s Day with an indoor concert featuring Irish and Scottish folk tunes and classic pub songs from bands Tallymoore and Ceol Carde. Headlining the event will be U2 Zoo.

-The City of West Bend is proud to announce Albiero Plumbing as Business of the Year. Join us at the award presentation: Wednesday, April 4 5 p.m. Albiero Plumbing · HVAC 1940 N. Main Street, West Bend Please arrive any time between 5 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. The presentation

will begin at 5:15. A celebration will follow with drinks and appetizers, with the event concluding at 8 p.m.

Candidate forum in Village of Jackson

Four candidates vying for two seats on as Trustee on the Village of Jackson Board took part in a forum on Thursday at the Jackson Area Community Center.  The very respectful forum was hosted by the Greater Jackson Business Alliance.

Village of Jackson Trustee – Two seats for two years

Keith Berben –  advocate for stewardship – waste not, want not, affordable solutions with set budget. Business owner, find an affordable solution. Jackson will continue to grow and will advocate for smart development. Work with Park and Rec to plan for events.

John Kruepke (I) –Grew up on farm in Jackson. Has farmer work ethics. Graduated from UW-Madison and then got into gas station business. Wife of 50 years and two sons and seven grandchildren, past member of Jackson FD from 1978. Current member of Plan Commission and personnel committee, past member of Park & Rec and DPW. Business owner and has learned a lot on Village Board

Debra Kurtz (I) – Homeowner for 18 years in Village of Jackson. Works in Glendale as accounting mgr. On the Village Board for two years and got on because she’s seen good and bad and thought it best to be a part of change. Wants to grow with Jackson

Gary Malcolm – love Jackson.  Member of ethics committee. In industry for 35 years. Marine Veteran and member of Trinity Lutheran Church.

Capital projects for village and how to pay

JK – couple major projects and one is the new school in Jackson. It’ll be a major project. As a board we don’t have to come up with funds. Other project is new PD and new FD. PD is working out of what used to be FD. Buildings will be $10 million and working with financial advisors to see how it works with revenues and TIF district. Tax money will have to come from public. We don’t want this to be heavy impact on taxpayers.

DK – School project vs safety building. Discussion about where school should be and where FD should be and I’m concerned about spending money on property that is in my mind we don’t need. We have 6.5 acres where FD is now. Why can’t we build right there. I don’t know what type of agreement with WBSD and now there’s talk of school building. There’s word the school wanted to buy the house. I’m for schools and safety buildings but we have more discussion.

GM – our school is obsolete. We need a new school and I don’t know about the finances.

KB – my kids are in a private school. I’m for a new school but it would make Jackson grow. The FD needs to make changes and would be nice to have larger space. Not sure how to pay for it. The PD is fine where it is.

How to lure more industry to Village

DK – No answer now

GM – we need industrial park

KB – if we can make it easier for companies to come in and work with them. Make it easier for biz to come into village

JK – TIF districts would help bring biz into town. Biz park there are large industrial buildings and small incubator buildings.  Putting in place TIF No. 6 and as these fill up we need to extend the TIF districts.

Action in Jackson and declining attendance – should it be replaced with a new event

GM – Action in Jackson has become a beer drinking party and not a wholesome type of family thing to have in Jackson. Replace it with

KB – Always loved AIJ. How do you replace? Not sure there’s room for fireworks but that would be great. Get more softball and volleyball tournaments, but how to get people involved and then competing with other surrounding events is an issue.

JK – As time went on the population that came to AIJ dwindled. Work to put it on increased but less volunteers. Legion getting older. Food stand was a horrendous job. When FD had beer stand then a lot of income was generated. Eventually beer stand went away. Bands have to be paid to be in parade. I have no idea and I give all the blessings in the world

DK – AIJ has history of fun and family. Want to see some it stay but needs changes. One good thing is our Sprecherfest has brought in a lot of people. Bring more family stuff in for village.

Village growth and lots for single family housing are fewer – how to grow

KB – We need to find land and then develop. Doesn’t come with a lot of cost. Need to update sewer in Village if we bring in more housing. All for development but thinks it’s a big risk for a developer.

JK – No matter what type of housing it depends on what public is interested in. Went from condos to now single family. Need a developer who can make a buck. As a village we can work with developers best we can. We can make the process as simple as possible. You need a balance in the community. We have a percentage laid out for various housing.

DK – We don’t need more apartments or condos, single families we could use but not sure how to make that happen.

GM – appalled at resistance from the Town not to be joined with the Village. In former home the community simply annexed the neighboring property. Why can’t that happen in the Village.

Raising chickens and bees in Jackson

JK – chicken is the buzz word. We’re looking at other communities and exploring ordinances. This will end up at Plan Commission and it would be logical to set parameters. Chickens yes and roosters no.  How many chickens, size of lot, coops – all will be discussed. If someone wants it the neighbors have to agree.

DK – not a big deal for chickens but neighbors have to agree.

GM – how about a minimum of 1 acres to have chickens or bees. Hesitate to bring into small neighborhood.

KB – I’m for chickens. There are noise concerns. Bees scare me. Need more land.  I’m allergic to bees.

Steps to strengthen or repair town of Jackson and Village

DK – that’s tough because there’s a lot of animosity. Not sure how to repair that situation. Hopefully with time – that will be healed.

GM – at one time the Village and Town got along great. Need to talk to each other and have meetings to settle differences.

KB – There are a lot of old time farmers in the Village and we all just have to be adults and come to a conclusion and plan our futures.

JK – Talked about 1970s when pres of Village and Town wouldn’t talk to each other. Over the years new blood helped end lack of communication.  Some reports make it off kilter. I think the two parties are working together and now it’s in hands of the state.  We’ll have to wait and see decision. No matter what happens the Village will work with the Town. We’re too far in to not do it.  This will heal itself.

Level of village debt and new trend

GM – not know enough

KB – spoke with John Walters and he said Village is doing well financially. Will numbers stay this way, I hope so but I think upcoming projects will put a damper on the budget numbers and roads.

JK – financially we’re ok.  Water utility and treatment plant are both paid for. User fees help with maintenance issues and expansion issues. Village is down to $7 million in borrowing and with police and fire building will need help with that. Working hard with financial advisors.

DK – Village has worked hard to be in positive financial situation and I see things getting better.

If you had to identify single most important topic facing village and why

KB – School needs to happen. Sooner than later. It will open many doors to community. As far as paying for it – has to go through WBSD and one board meeting they tried to do this and people in WB wouldn’t vote for it.

JK – you can’t pick a number one thing. Everything hinges on everything else, TIF, PD, FD… everything takes money. Need to work together.  PD and FD have been patient. Jackson people want Jackson PD and Jackson people want Jackson FD.  They need a safe place to work out of.  Need for FD and PD to be happy or there will be a budget buster for a fulltime FD.

DK – School not sure what answer is. There’s only 276 students and that’s not a lot of kids. Many kids are going to private schools and a lot of parents are choosing that option. It’s trying to find balance.

GM – children are our future. As far as money goes – there’s free money from government programs and there’s a possibility to do the same thing.

What motivated you to run for office?

JK – I started when I moved here in 1976 to run for Village Board. I campaigned. I got elected and it just grows under your skin to help the community.  You work with these people and it’s challenging at times. My son says, “I don’t know how you can stand that.”  But you learn to work with people.

DK –  I wanted to know where my tax dollars are being spent and for me that was to run for a village position. This gives me a better understanding of how my money is spent.

GM – I have a lot of passion for this community. I show my passion by volunteering.  Started in transportation and now for 3 years I deliver meals to shut-ins and also volunteer at Jackson Area Community Center.

KB – I’m young. I’m a sponge. I want to learn. Knowledge is power. The economy is going good. I want Action in Jackson to prosper and be able to build up Jackson with more homes. I want to be here the rest of my life.

Closing remarks

GM – I’m passionate and want to put that to use

DK – Look forward to serving another term

JK –  Happy to be trustee for a couple years.  I have enough of a mind to benefit the village

KB – This has been fun, even though I was scared. I hope you vote and thanks for coming out.  I want to learn

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Thanks to Roger Kist for being a great community leader

There are few communities as lucky as Washington County to have a plethora of people dedicated to helping make it a better place. One of the notable community leaders is Roger Kist.

Kist, 81, was a young pup when he moved to Ridge Run Park in November 1967. Originally hired as caretaker of the park, Kist said it “reminded me a lot of when I worked on the farm.” A supervisor at the park, Kist sported a handlebar mustache and eventually became a fixture known as Ranger Roger.

Aside from the parks and Washington County Tourism, Kist has been a familiar face in politics on both the West Bend common council and as a supervisor, elected in April of 2016, to the Washington County Board.

“When I was on the council and I was also chairman of the local Republican Party,” said Kist. “I remember Mike Schlotfeldt was elected alderman and he chaired the Democratic Party. When he sat down he looked over at me like the devil had just shown up.”

Kist took his time and built a relationship with the representative from Dist. 6. “When Mike decided not to run again we had a little party and he said to me, ‘Roger you’re the only friend I’ve got.’”

Over the years Kist has made quite a few friends and below are some comments from friends and coworkers about the impact he’s made in this county and the community.

West Bend Police Chief Ken Meuler: I met Roger before he ever ran for alderperson as he has always been actively involved in the community. He donates his time to a number of community events, and supports almost every community function. Anyone out in the community will see him at Music on Main, Farmer’s Market, church festivals, parades, and numerous fundraisers in the community. During his time as an alderperson he has not been someone that pounds his fists or grandstands, but he always speaks up on issues that are important to him and his constituents. He has called me on a number of police issues to get a better understanding of our policies and practices. He has been a strong supporter of the police throughout his tenure as alderperson. I have always enjoyed working with Roger as an alderperson and appreciate all he has done for the community. More important, I value his friendship.

Washington County Supervisor Marilyn Merten: “Roger has always been a considerate and caring individual and he’s willing to do a good job at whatever he did.” Merten was county clerk and worked with Kist when he was at the Washington County Planning and Parks Department. “I’d contact Roger to help make the grounds look nice at the county building. Roger would always take care of it.”

Leah Baughman at Interfaith Caregivers of Washington County: “Roger Kist is very active and in touch with the West Bend community and knows what is needed to help support its citizens. When asked if he would like to be a part of the Interfaith/RSVP Advisory Council Roger very graciously accepted right away. Even though this venture has just begun he has been an important member that has contributed many great ideas and support.”

Todd Tennies remembered Kist when he worked and lived at Ridge Run Park.  “As a little boy I can remember going to Ridge Run Park and riding bikes past the log cabin as we headed to our favorite fishing spot. Roger would always stop and say ‘Hi’ and ask us how the fishing was. He was always friendly and willing to talk to us kids. After his retirement from the county he settled in and served the community through his involvement in city government. He did a great job and always had an interest in what was best for the community. His interest in our county also carried over into the Tourism Committee for Washington County. He did an extraordinary job promoting the Washington County Fair Park as well as all of our wonderful parks we have in this county.  Great job Roger.”

Dist. 5 alderman Rich Kasten said Kist is somebody he really admires. “The things he’s accomplished at the county and city and he can still walk down the street and people know him from Ridge Run Park. I wish I could be more like him with his ability to relate to people and between him and his wife the way they’re prepared for every meeting. I’m very lucky I’ve been able to spend time on the council with him.”

Mayor Kraig Sadownikow said serving the community is in Roger’s blood. “Whether it’s an elected position, or in his career or during his time off he’s always been committed to service and giving back to the community.

West Bend City Administrator Jay Shambeau said Kist’s name is relatively synonymous with park land and this community.  “To promote the development, use and preserving of parks and the fact he has not wavered in his opinion is really a tribute to him. He’s everywhere. He’s the longstanding West Bend member of the Mid-Moraine Municipal Association and he attends league conferences and the Alliance meetings.”

Former West Bend city clerk Amy Reuteman spent 15 years at City Hall and noted, “Roger Kist has been there forever. And he’s early; you can always count on Roger to be early.”

Thank you Roger Kist for your dedication and service to help make West Bend and Washington County a great community.

Plans scrapped to raze old West Bend Brewery building

City officials in West Bend have confirmed development plans have fallen through regarding razing the old West Bend Brewery on N. Main Street and building a 90-unit apartment complex.

City administrator Jay Shambeau said Robert Bach from P2 Development Company, LLC is no longer pursuing the development.

Since November 2017 Bach was moving forward with a proposed multi-family residential development which would have leveled the brewery building from Franklin Street and Main to the north and include retailers RT Speed Shop, Casa Guadalupe, Pruett’s Floor Covering, Ray’s Shoes, and Fuge Plumbing.

“Everything was progressing in a positive manner,” according to Shambeau. “And then just like that he (Bach) informed Chris Schmidt, the building owner, he was no longer interested.”

The project made an initial pass before the West Bend Plan Commission last November 2017 and a site survey was underway.

“We’re disappointed the development is not going forward but we’re hopeful that this idea has paved the way for someone else to take the ball and complete a project,” Shambeau said.

The old brewery building is owned by Chris Schmidt and Clifton Davis. Schmidt said, “I can’t speak for P2 Development, but I can tell you we are continuing to work with the City and discussing development options with a few different people.  There are a lot of good things happening in West Bend, and we believe the property can be improved and be a positive catalyst for the west side of the river, north of Washington Street.  I thought P2 Development’s plans would have been successful, but we are currently looking into various uses, in addition to a residential component.”

Building tenant, Ray Carlson owner of Ray’s Shoes, 459 N. Main Street, was pleased to hear the news. Carlson has run his cobbler shop out of the old brewery office building for nearly 20 years.

When the story about razing the brewery first broke in November neighbors were disappointed and heart sick at the loss of another piece of history in West Bend.

Shirley McDaniel Schwartz – My heart high has no skin or money in the game says “ no, no, no.” My brain, as simple as it is, sees the problems and the money needed to take an old building and make it doable in today’s codes. I hope whatever is done is tasteful for downtown and the history it holds and not the ultra modern, industrial look that says nothing to the history of downtown West Bend.

Russ Lange – There surely can be something that could go into the building to preserve it and not another multi-family building.

Richard Frank – Is the WB Company Apartments 100% occupied that more are needed? Sad to see bits and pieces of Historic West Bend removed bit by bit.

Adam Bunkelman West Bend can find more ways to destroy the history than saving it. Why can’t it be rehabbed in its current state? Leave the structure and history. They did it with the Enger Kress building and Amity building. Maybe think outside the box. It can’t be cheap to tear it down!!

Chris Weston That is sad that so much of West Bend’s history has become irrelevant.

Calls have been placed to Bach and building owner Chris Schmidt. Their comments will be posted when information becomes available.

Shambeau said the city is still moving forward with plans to vacate Franklin Street. That item will go before the council during its next meeting in March.

Former Barton State Bank and Barton TV sold

The building formerly home to Barton State Bank, Barton TV and currently Woodland Iron & Firearms, 1715 Barton Avenue in West Bend, has been sold. According to real estate records at City Hall the property sold Feb. 21, 2018 for $91,200.

Joseph and Mary Eisen of West Bend bought the parcel from Roger and Barbara Landvatter.

The 2017 assessed value was $77,000. The Landvatters purchased the property from the VFW in July 1983 for $22,000.

Records show an addition was put in the back in 1985.  The commercial lot is identified as “Old Bank Bld (building) – T.V. Showroom and Store.  An added note: Women’s toilet room – plumbing disconnected.

The Eisens are owners of Eisen Arms LLC, 409 Main Street, in Kewaskum. The store carries handguns, rifles, shotguns, and ladies lines of concealed-carry purses and Glock clothing.

The Eisens opened in Kewaskum in October 2016. “Barton will be our second location,” said Mary Eisen. “We were welcomed with open arms in Kewaskum and we’re just going to see if both stores will work out.”

The Eisens happened to be looking for a property. They said they made an offer on the Barton location because it basically “fell into our lap.”

“We’ll have the stores running simultaneously, but we’ll make the Barton location the hub,” she said.

The timeline includes an update on the Kewaskum store and, with a tenant in the Barton building, that opening will be this summer possibly in June. “We liked the Barton location because it’s closer to home, the property is larger and we’ll have more retail space and more space for classes,” Mary Eisen said.

On a history note: The building at 1715 Barton Avenue was built in 1915. According to the book A History the Village of Barton by Richard H. Driessel the bank “was a substantial brick building with a fireproof vault and a burglar alarm system.”

Also written by Richard H. Driessel: The stock market collapse of 1929 is well-remembered. Locally a rather large manufacturing plant, the Barton Axle Company, at first created much optimism and employment but did not survive.

Several housing developments, ambitious for the size of the village no doubt for the hurt the local economy. In 1930 the bank was strain to the point where it closed its doors and eventually declared bankruptcy, which was the fate of so many others soon afterward.

The assets and liabilities were assumed by a bank in West Bend and eventually the depositors recovered almost all of their funds, although several years elapsed.

At our time in history it’s hard to understand why a bank would fail during that so-called period of prosperity. The fact is that the prosperity was not on a solid foundation and they were basic flaws in the post-war economy.

To put the Barton State Bank situation in proper perspective it’s only fair to point out that between 1921 and 1928 the number of banks in the United States which close their doors was 5,214.

The bank was vacant for several years but later was used for other purposes. It was purchased by Joseph Kirsch in 1932 and used as a harness shop.  In 1941 Louis Kritz had as a tailoring and dry cleaning establishment.

In 1945 Baltus Rolfs bought it and started the Ivo Chapstick Company which manufactured a lip balm and applicators. The Veterans of Foreign Wars Adrian Neubauer Post 8658 but the building from Lip Ivo Inc. in 1954 to use it as their clubhouse. Later it was used as a commercial building.

Upgrades in store for the former Sears building

The old Sears building in downtown West Bend is going to get a face lift. This week the West Bend Plan Commission reviewed a site plan for exterior architectural building alterations the incoming Pearl of Canton restaurant, 102 S. Main Street and 515 Hickory Street.  The property is zoned B-2 Central Business District.

Architectural Building Elevations:

o       The north elevation of the building will be updated with an “Antique White” colored EFIS treatment that will be constructed over the main door entrance Hickory Street.  The Existing brick will be also repainted “Antique White”.

o       All of the existing windows have been or will be replaced during the renovations.

As a part of the improvements, a wall sign is proposed on the east and north sides of the building above the entrances.  The exact size of the sign is not shown and will have to conform to the zoning code size requirements.  Staff has no concerns with the sign location.

Gift of Giving fundraiser for Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse

The Gift of Giving fundraiser is April 7 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at King Pin Bowl and Ale House, 1022 S. Main Street in West Bend. Bo’s Heavenly Clubhouse is a nonprofit charity organization that was formed when Amanda Hartwig’s family experienced the loss of their 10-month-old son, Bo. “We had nowhere to turn for grief support and aid for mental anguish,” she said.

West Bend School District notifies parents of student walkout

The West Bend School District sent a note to parents today notifying them about a potential student walkout next week.

According to School Board member Joel Ongert, “This is a national thing and we have not heard much chatter about it in our district with our middle or high school kids,” he said.

The letter was initiated by Laura Jackson Assistant Superintendent for Teaching and Learning/ Lead District Administrator. “Laura felt we need to let parents know we are aware of this and here are our expectations of students,” Ongert said.

The district reportedly took its cue on the walkout from social media. “We’ve been in touch with West Bend P.D. to make sure kids are safe,” said Ongert.

When questioned who is in charge in the West Bend School District, Ongert said Laura Jackson is in charge.

“Laura has been asking principals, homeroom teachers and to see if kids are talking about this and if they want to participate and we want to be prepared,” he said. “If there’s a national campaign for a walkout we want to make sure if our kids participate they’re going to be safe.”

Questioned whether students are safer during the day in school or out of school Ongert said “in school, absolutely.”

Questioned whether this will disrupt education that day, Ongert said “we certainly hope it won’t disrupt.”

In Slinger Superintendent Daren Sievers said they too have heard about the day to bring national attention to school safety and the concerns following the school shooting in Florida.

“What we’re doing is we’re trying to channel the kids to do something positive,” he said.

At 10 a.m. on March 14 students in the Slinger School District will be participating in a school-wide moment of silence for 17 seconds.

“Mr. Ourada will go on the P.A. and announce the 17 students lost in the Florida shooting and then at lunch we’ll have banners where the kids can come write down a pledge in support of eliminating school violence,” said Sievers.

A couple of students at Slinger High School will also release 17 balloons following the moment of silence.

Note from West Bend School District: Administrators and teachers at West Bend Joint School District #1, West Bend East High School, West Bend West High School, and Badger Middle School are aware of the potential peaceful school walkout on March 14 at 10 a.m. by students to show their concerns about school safety.

The West Bend School District will not penalize students who choose to assemble peacefully for 17 minutes on March 14. After talking with students and staff, the school principals have developed plans to maintain the safety of the participating and non-participating students and to minimize interference with educational programming.

Those students who wish to participate in the walkout will be monitored and supervised by school staff to ensure that any walkout is safe and orderly. The West Bend Police Department will also help to ensure the safety of students to assemble in pre-designated areas.

Students who choose to participate will be expected to return to class in a timely manner and resume the school day. Students who fail to return to class will be considered truant in violation of school rules. For students who choose not to participate, school administrators and teachers are planning for classroom instruction to continue.

No media will be allowed on school grounds during this event to help maintain the safety of all involved.

Mike Christian is the new Dist. 2 alderman in West Bend

There’s a new District 2 alderman in West Bend. During Monday night’s meeting the Common Council reviewed two applications to fill the seat left vacant following the resignation of former alderman Steve Hutchins.

Two applicants submitted resumes by the Feb. 26 deadline including Mike Christian and Sonja Hanrahan. The pair made brief 3-minute presentations before the council and then Dist. 7 alderman Adam Williquette made the motion to select Christian.

“What I really like about Mike is that he’s been involved in the community with various boards and organizations and then he ran for city council,” said Williquette. “He’s going to be a good fit and he’s been following from the sidelines.”

Christian was then sworn into office by city clerk Stephanie Justman. “I feel like a lot of what I have done over the past years has led me to this point,” said Christian. “This is the next natural step for me and my dedication to the city of West Bend.”

Two UW-WC basketball players selected All Conference

Meghan MacFarlane and Marissa Kaul have been named to the Wisconsin Collegiate Conference 2nd team All-Conference team. MacFarlane averaged 12.3 points per game and made at least one 3-point shot in 10 straight games. She shot 48% from the field and 48% from behind the arc. MacFarlane led the team in blocked shots with 1.2 blocks per game, and she was tied for first on the team with 1.8 steals per game.

Kaul, the captain of the Wildcats, was voted All-Conference because of her all-around play.  She averaged 9.5 points per game and grabbed a team high 8.3 rebounds per game.  She also shot 51% from the field and 80% from the free throw line. Kaul was also tough on defense as she consistently guarded the opposing teams’ best player and often was undersized.  Kaul led the team with 33.1 minutes per game, and played in every single game this season.

Updates & tidbits

Dundee’s St. Patrick’s Day parade is tomorrow, Sunday, March 11.

-Former Washington County Clerk Arthur Degnitz has died. Degnitz was County Clerk from 1985 to 1994. He died Wednesday, March 7. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 17, 2018 at the Myrhum Patten Miller & Kietzer Funeral Home in West Bend.

– March is Youth Art Month and the West Bend School District has its Mile of Art on display in downtown West Bend. This is the 16th year for the exhibit, according to Decorah Elementary School art teacher Mickiah Wolff. “This will be an exciting way to display the students’ work in a more public atmosphere,” said Wolff.

 – The earliest anyone in Washington County will be able to vote absentee for the upcoming general election is March 19. Election Day is Tuesday, April 3.

– The city of West Bend will spend $10,650 with a Brookfield firm to do a traffic count and signal-timing project on a stretch of Paradise Drive that runs from Seventh Avenue to 18th Avenue.

– The Washington County Fair Park will be celebrating this St. Patrick’s Day with an indoor concert featuring Irish and Scottish folk tunes and classic pub songs from bands Tallymoore and Ceol Carde. Headlining the event will be U2 Zoo.

– United Way of Washington County announced the approval of new board officers for the 2018-2019 term. Pete Rettler, dean of Moraine Park Technical College’s West Bend campus, has been selected board president. “Serving as Chair of the Community Impact Committee the last few years allowed me to learn about some incredible programs being provided in Washington County,” Rettler said. “It also showed me how our United Way dollars are tied directly to measurable outcomes that positively impact our communities. I am very humbled to lead a very influential group of community leaders and looking forward to working with Kristin and her team.” The other board officers are: vice president Josh Schoemann, Washington County; treasurer Tom Hopp, Commerce State Bank; and secretary Cory Neuy of Regal Ware.

– A nice sendoff Friday for Judy Steinert, 63, who has worked for Washington County the past 35 years. “I started in the old courthouse in Social Service and that was my first job for about eight years,” said Steinert. “Then I went to Planning and Parks Department for two years and then I worked in Economic Development with Marcia Theusch for eight years and then when they created administration I was here.”

Gordon Ellis was Steinert’s first boss and after that she worked for Doug Johnson and eventually Josh Schoemann.

Jamie Ludovic was one of several dozen county workers who came to show their appreciation for Steinert. “There’s nothing more important than the people who work for the county and who are committed and dedicated,” she said. “The most important thing we can do is recognize that.”

Steinert said in retirement she will spend more time camping and more time with her grandchildren. “Yes, I do have my Washington County Parks sticker,” she said.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Ries’ Sausage Plus has closed

Neighbors coming home from work Thursday afternoon reacted with a bit of shock to find the doors closed at Ries’ Sausage Plus Spirits Meat & Deli, 1435 W. Washington Street in West Bend.

“Did you know about this,” said Barb Justman. She stopped just before 4 p.m. to pick up a small deli tray of sausages. “Oh come on…..”

Justman was obviously disappointed.

A white sign on the door read ‘We are closed until further notice. Thank you.’

Another neighbor named Paul pulled up in his pickup truck, got out and started walking toward the store.

“They’re closed,” said Nick Thill from Honey Grove Ice Cream.  He was walking his dog across 15th Avenue. “I had honey and some ice cream in there,” Thill said. “He paid up front so I’m not worried.”

Glancing through the store windows Thill’s wife said the shelves “looked empty” as well as the deli.

Businesses in the strip mall said other customers came in Wednesday night asking why the store was dark. One person said there was a semi out back earlier in the day.

In February 2016 Steve and Karen Ries sold the store to Sammy Toor of Illinois.

Toor made some changes, including replacing Kewaskum Frozen Foods line of meats and sausage with the Boar’s Head brand. Customers complained and the traditional Kewaskum Frozen Foods was brought back, albeit short term.

In late 2017 an unsubstantiated rumor filtered around social media announcing the store’s demise.

Toor said it was not true and spent months advertising and trying to market for Christmas sales.

There’s been no response to messages left at the store today.

Officials at City Hall in West Bend said they had no update and a direct phone number for the owner was not available.

Some neighbors are concerned because they’re made reservations for fundraising brat frys this summer at the little Red Shed Brat Haus on Highway 33. Ries’ Sausage Plus handled the rental of that facility and often supplied the meat for the various organizations.

Funeral services for Bob Pick Jr.

Funeral services for Bob Pick Jr., 76, will be held Monday, Feb. 26 at St. James Episcopal Church, 148 S. Eighth Avenue in West Bend.

Mother Mindy Valentine Davis will preside over the service. Myrhum-Patten Funeral Home is handling arrangements. Visitation will be from 1 p.m. – 2:50 p.m. The memorial service will be at 3 p.m. with a reception afterwards.

Bob Pick Jr. died the evening of Friday, Feb. 16 at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee.

Doug Gonring was with Pick in his final hours. “I really didn’t know his condition and I walked into his room and asked him what he was doing lying around because we had spring training right around the corner,” said Gonring.

Doctors spoke with Doug and his wife Karen. The Gonrings spent several hours at Pick’s bedside. They even held a cell phone to his ear as Pick’s sister Suzanne offered a prayer to her older brother and reassured him it was OK to be with the Lord.

“I said if you hear God’s voice and you want to go to heaven you can go,” said Suzanne. “I release you because they told me you’re very sick. I told him you can see mom and dad and Jenny and Tim and I prayed for him. I said right now Bobby be at peace with other people so you can be in heaven.”

Gonring said the prayer drove everyone in the room to tears.

After the Gonrings returned home Friday evening they received a call around 6:40 p.m. that Pick had died.

Gonring penned a piece for Pick’s obituary  –  Bob was the best teammate on a baseball field I ever had 30 years of never missing a game, take that back he missed one because of some dental work. Bob showed young men what was imperfect in baseball and what is so perfect about baseball. He showed them respect, accountability, and dedication but most of all for 30 years he showed each team or family how important it is to have friends. Bob, by his own account,  never was good enough to play but boy did he show us how to be a great scorekeeper and do it with his unique humor. Will be missed by my family.

Other tributes and memorials are below.

Robert C. Pick III – Thank you for being a great father and for all you did for the city of West Bend.

B.J. Royes  – Indeed, Bob was a West Bend legend.  Never anything negative to say about the athletes, the coaches, or the officials – just a loyal supporter of local athletics.  He loved to be seen and to be a part of the scene.  I’ll miss Bob shuffling into the Fieldhouse or into Regner Park – a hot dog in one hand, and his brown leather bag hung over his shoulder.  RIP old friend.

Jerry Mehring – My memories of Bob Pick go back to our High School days.  He was behind me in High School.  Every day when he met someone new at school he would offer them a stick of gum from his “Gold Gumtainer.”  It was a gold colored container that held a pack of gum with a flip lid.  He was so proud of it.  After High School Bob and his sister Jenny went into the Navy.  When they would be home on leave you would see them both walking up and down Main Street on Friday nights. When we had the Dairy Queen, on South Main Bob would come in every week during football and basketball season to make sure our manager had the home game schedules so that they would schedule enough help to handle the crowd after the games. Whenever you would meet Bob around town he always had a memory or story or joke.  He was definitely a fixture in West Bend and I will be missed by many including me.

Liquor license for Boro Buzdum at former Long Branch Saloon

There was a thorough grilling for Boro Buzdum during Monday night’s West Bend Licensing Committee meeting as Police Chief Ken Meuler held a 1-inch folder of information and violations connected with establishments related to Buzdum.

The Licensing Committee was reviewing a Reserve Class B Combination License for Buzdum’s Pub & Grill in Barton, formerly Long Branch Saloon.

Chief Ken Meuler documented a troubled past for Buzdum.

Dist. 7 alderman Adam Williquette said he spoke with Lt. Duane Farrand regarding the liquor license to be contingent on reviewing building permits for the property.

Dist. 5 alderman Rich Kasten had some concerns about the violations at Buzdum’s establishment in Germantown. “I just question if this decision is the right one,” said Kasten.

Dist. 6 alderman Steve Hoogester and Dist. 1 alderman John Butschlick both said they had reservations as well.

City attorney Ian Prust said West Bend Police have been extremely proactive in the enforcement of over-serving violations and following up on OWI offenses. “I don’t disagree with your interpretation of the situation but it’s not quite there to deny it from a legal standpoint,” said Prust.

The council voted 5-2 to approve the license with Dist. 5 alderman Kasten and Dist. 8 alderman Roger Kist dissenting.

Buzdum currently owns Buzdums Pub & Grill on Maple Road in Germantown. Buzdum previously owned Sophia’s Pub and Eatery in the Dove Plaza in Slinger. That opened in June 2015 and has since closed.

In 2012 Buzdum purchased the former Players Pub & Grill and opened Spearmint Rhino Gentlemen’s Club on Highway 33 east in the Town of Trenton.  That establishment opened in 2013 and closed a couple years ago.

In 2016 the West Bend Common Council did pass a cabaret ordinance which prohibits adult entertainment within the city limits.

Early word is Buzdum is gutting the building on Barton Avenue. He’s expected to open the small corner bar this summer and he will occupy the apartment above.

Try hockey for free at the Kettle Moraine Ice Center

The Washington County Youth Hockey Association invites boys and girls to the Kettle Moraine Ice Center on Saturday, March 3 for a Try Hockey For Free clinic as part of Hockey Weekend Across America.

From 2-3:30 p.m. local youth, ages 4 to 9, are encouraged to experience ice hockey for the first time and learn the basic skills in a fun, safe environment.

“We look forward to welcoming families to the rink to try our great sport of ice hockey” said WCYHA President Todd Filter. “Our goal is for these families to enjoy watching their kids learn new skills with big smiles on their faces.”

USA Hockey’s Try Hockey program, with the support of the National Hockey League and NHL member clubs, among others, is designed to provide youth hockey associations with a national platform to introduce new kids to the sport. Pure Hockey and Liberty Mutual Insurance are official sponsors of Try Hockey For Free Days. USA Hockey has close to 400 locations offering this unique opportunity to kids nationwide.

To register for this Try Hockey For Free event, please visit TryHockeyForFree.com. For more information, please contact: Brandon Bayer, CIT General Manager Kettle Moraine Ice Center (262)335-0876

Allenton Fire Department hands out awards                                 By Ron Naab

The Allenton Fire Department recognized Bruce Ellis with the George Moser Member of the Year award. Ellis was involved in the late 1980’s to early 1990’s with the Bark Lake and later Richfield Fire Departments.

He joined Allenton four years ago after the rescue squad responded to an incident in which his grandson was injured in a lawnmower accident.

Ellis is dedicated to helping others and is a shining light as he volunteers for many events the AFD sponsors, including Special Valentine’s Day Cards from the kids at Allenton Elementary.

 Updates & tidbits

The annual Bowl-A-Thon for the Washington County Dive Team is coming up Saturday, March 3. The event is held in memory of Michael Mann who fell through the ice on Big Cedar Lake and died in 2003.

– The Washington County Fair Park will be celebrating this St. Patrick’s Day with an indoor concert featuring Irish and Scottish folk tunes and classic pub songs from bands Tallymoore and Ceol Carde. Headlining the event will be U2 Zoo.

-The 7th annual Diamond Dinner & Benefit for the West Bend Baseball Association is March 3 at The Columbian. There will be a tribute to athletes who made their mark in local baseball circle including Mark Scholz, Adam Rohlinger, Bob Meyer, Bob Kissinger and TJ Fischer.

Nice funeral Mass for Jerry Butz

There was a nice turnout Tuesday at St. Frances Cabrini as friends and family gathered for the funeral Mass for Jerry Butz. The service started with a tribute by Sister Nancy Butz who provided a eulogy.

“Jerry’s outlook on life was ‘Don’t worry, be happy,’” read Sister Butz.

The tribute to Jerry Butz focused on his strong standards. “Jerry led by example. He was respectful and treated everyone with compassion.”

“Their house always had an open-door policy. Jerry would make you feel at home immediately.”

Jerry and his wife Karen were married nearly 60 years. Sister Butz said, “Jerry said that Karen was ‘one of a kind. I tell you that, she is perfect for me.’”

“He will be remembered for his smile, signature laugh, a man of deep compassion and a gentle giving spirit.”

Rev. Justin Lopina presided over the service and while he had a long list of memories he said one comment from the children of Jerry and Karen Butz stood out, “We’re all a little dad.”

The Knights of Columbus and veterans from the local VFW Post were in attendance to present military honors. Those in attendance included many community leaders and fellow business owners who expressed their condolences.

“When I heard that he passed the first thought in my mind was that he was a man who always had a smile on his face,” said West Bend Mayor Kraig Sadownikow.

“Always had a good laugh and a few years ago we proclaimed it Jerry Butz Day in West Bend and we had a little parade around the block and we ended up at his house for his 80th birthday.”

Gerald “Jerry” A. Butz, 84, passed away peacefully on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 at The Kathy Hospice in West Bend, surrounded by family.

Jerry will be remembered as an active member of the West Bend community and always enjoyed giving his time to charities. Jerry was an avid golfer, enjoyed gardening, traveled the world and especially loved spending time with his extended family and friends. Jerry will always be remembered for his smile and signature laugh.

Remember the old mom-and-pop grocery stores

As word filters around West Bend about the news surrounding Ries’ Sausage Plus there was a day when a small corner grocery was the buzz of activity in town.

Long before Piggly Wiggly, Pick ‘n Save, Sentry, Red Owl, Kohl’s Food Store and A&P – West Bend was home to a number of mom-and-pop groceries and food marts set up in the downtown and on quiet street corners.

In the 1930s there was the Perry-Page Grocery store on Seventh Avenue and Chestnut. It was run by Ida Page and Rev. Perry. That corner building, 403 S. 7th Ave., was home to Roffler Styling.

National Tea was the National Food Store located on Main St. just south of the West Bend Theatre; Edward Schmidt was the manager. National Tea later moved to N. Main St., just south of the brewery and Gene Stark was manager.

In the 1930s and 1940s Held Food Mart had three stores in West Bend. Harvey Held ran the store at 241 N. Main St.; it was in the Gonring Building where Grasshopper Restaurant is currently located.  Another Held’s was at 121 S. Main St.; the current home of Ted Newman Signs. Held and Kirsch was also a local store.

Richard Krueger owned a little neighborhood grocery called the West Side Cash Store; it was on the southwest corner of Tenth and Cedar Street.

Flitter’s Queen’s Quality Grocery, 1270 Chestnut St., was on the northeast corner of Silverbrook and Chestnut where Tyberg Dental Clinic is located.

Kash N Karry was at 1411 W. Washington St. just to the west of Myrhum Patten Funeral Home, where West Bend Furniture and Design currently stands.

Otten’s Store was at 1805 Barton Ave. in what’s currently Small Town Bait & Tackle. The Otten family ran the store and the last member of the family business was Gene Otten.

Schuster’s Grocery, 1779 Barton Ave., was run by Tom Schuster; the store was across from the Gadow Roller Mills. Xpressions bead and yarn store is in the old grocery.

George Carbon’s IGA was across from the Washington House. The grocery was the old Central Hotel run by BC Ziegler’s father.

Winter Grocery was on the southwest corner of Oak and Main St. was a store started by Flora Huber who later added a little lunch room. Later the business was run by Bill Hess.

Henry E. Peters had a store in the 500 block of Hickory across from Winkler’s Office City. William Peters had a huge mercantile store in the same

Wegener’s Red Bell Market was a store on Hickory St. east of Sixth Avenue. It was run by Reuben Wegener. “Reuben would fill telephone orders for my mother,” said Kevin O’Meara.

Heipp General Store was at Fifth Avenue and Walnut. A photo shows Fred Heipp at the reigns with his dog Putzy. The horse was named Nancy and she served as the delivery horse for Heipp General Store since she was 6-years-old.

At age 38, Nancy collapsed on the street and was unable to get up without help. Heipp retired Nancy and replaced her with a younger horse called Babe.

“Fritz Heipp delivered ice to our home for our refrigerators, before the electric models,” said Peg Ziegler.

The Heipp General Store was later home to Mehring’s Fishery, John’s Photography, and is currently Hometown Talents & Treasures.

Researchers at the Washington County Historical Society helped cobble together this partial list of grocery stores in West Bend.

Note on grocery stores

I read with interest your recent story regarding small Mom & Pop grocery stores that were in business prior to the typical big grocery stores coming into town.  I would offer the thought that you missed a really good one that was right in the middle of downtown West Bend – the Bye Low grocery – a full service grocery that had a full service meat department, bakery and general grocery store.  Having spent a lot of time there as a child (my Dad owned the store – this would have been in the 1950’s) it was a great little store with lots of the old time businesses in the downtown area in full operation when West Bend was still a small town – some of these businesses were well known outside of town (BC Ziegler, The West Bend Company, Amity and others). Just an additional thought and maybe a follow up to your story?! Thanks  Steve