Category Archives: Politics – Wisconsin

Madison Teachers Push for Longer Vacation

So the folks working at Wal Mart and Kwik Trip – not to mention doctors, nurses, firefighters, police officers, construction workers, utility workers, social workers, prison guards, soldiers, sailors, insurance agents, etc. – can manage to go to work, but the teachers won’t. We see how they value education and the kids they purport to serve.

TODAY, Madison Teachers Inc. requests that Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD) pursue an all virtual learning model as the 2020-21 school year begins. Virtual learning is the best model to ensure the physical and emotional health of our students, staff, and the families in their households.

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Fails

The Evers’ administration’s incompetence is a disgrace.

MADISON (AP) — A new audit says an unknown number of unemployed people in Wisconsin received too much, or not enough, in benefits from the state Department of Workforce in late April.

The errors came as the department worked to process additional money in federal aid to help those suddenly out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Legislative Audit Bureau said Wednesday that the department should determine how many people were sent incorrect amounts and how much, then report back by Aug. 14.

Agency Secretary Caleb Frostman says the department is implementing all of the audit’s recommendations.

West Bend Teacher Tries Distance Leftist Indoctrination

Wow. This is apparently what this teacher feels is appropriate. Imagine what it’s like in the classroom.

A teacher in the West Bend School District (WBSD) sent out the following email today, Wednesday, July 8, in her regular “Summer Check In” communication email with WBSD parents. Take a moment to click the links to the “free resource” being offered in the email below. Here are a few sample statements from the video:

“That’s what our emotions are…they’re the voice of our inner child that has been sitting there and asking for attention.”

“When we take the time to align our mind with our physical body we actually bring ourselves into presence.”

“Mindfulness is being in the present moment… bringing your awareness into the present moment with no judgement, with acceptance and with a willingness to be with what is.”

“There’s a lot of racial injustice going on right now and…it’s something where sometimes our own biases can be passed on to our children, and we definitely want to raise this next generation to be all inclusive, and all accepting, as best we possibly can.”

“This is 400 years of work built up in the black community, this is the work that’s built up in us watching this.” “Have I ever felt racist in any way? Have I ever thought things like “Oh, I don’t want to go near that person or have I seen a black person passing by and have I moved away…”

” We can apologize, we can be vulnerable…”

Government ponders response as cases rise

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News yesterday.

Wisconsin is seeing an uptick in daily reported COVID-19 cases as the summer warms up. The statistic that we are supposed to be scared about continues to shift as the scare-mongers and power-grabbers grasp around for the most alarming statistic, but Wisconsin has been seeing an increase in daily reported cases for about a month. Should our state government do anything about it? Mark Twain once wittily classified statistics as one of the three kinds of lies. If we remember back to when the coronavirus crisis came to a head in March, the two statistics that were being trumpeted were deaths and hospitalizations. Deaths were being tracked because the models predicted 2.2 million deaths in the United States. Those models have now been proven woefully incorrect, but we believed them at the time.

We tracked the number of hospitalizations because of the great fear that we would overwhelm the capacity of our health care system and cause a lethally cascading event. This was the whole logic behind “flatten the curve” and “15 days to slow the spread.” The logic was sound in the face of models projecting a doomsday pandemic, so we implemented striking infringements of our civil rights to flatten the curve.

Thankfully, as it turns out, we never came close to overwhelming our health care system and the overflow hospitals that were built were left unused. After the Supreme Court struck down Governor Tony Evers’ unconstitutional dictatorial power grab on May 13, the number of hospitalizations remained manageable and eventually declined. The death rate also continued to decline.

Now, two months after the state reopened, we are seeing an increase in daily reported cases and we are told by the media and our government that the state must act to lock down the state, require masks, or some other reactive measure to keep everyone panicked and docile.

Let us return to the statistics that we were originally concerned about. As of this weekend, there were 264 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 out of 7,305 active cases. That is a hospitalization rate of 3.6%. Wisconsin has 11,390 hospital beds of various uses – not including the overflow beds built by the state. At the peak of this crisis, 446 people were hospitalized. Wisconsin’s health care system still has ample capacity to handle the ongoing spread of the disease.

There seem to be two main reasons why Wisconsin is adding more cases every day but the hospitalization and death rate continue to be flat or decline. First, Wisconsin is testing more than ever. With a capacity of over 24,000 tests per day, testing has become easy and routine. Early during the pandemic, only people who were sick or suspected of being sick were tested. As such, the percentage of positive results was high. Now we are routinely testing entire workplaces or facilities and finding more people who have, or had, the virus without ever actually being sick.

Second, many of the cases being discovered are people who are younger, healthier, and fight off the virus as easily as a cold. The age group of 20-29 now comprises a full 25% of reported cases and growing, but only has a hospitalization rate of 3%. Whether the virus is spreading through the younger portion of the population or we are merely noticing it now that we are testing more is subject of speculation. In either case, it is a good thing. The virus is working though the least vulnerable portion of our population and building a natural community immunity. This is the surest way to protect the most vulnerable parts of our population.

The goal of our public policy was never to stop the virus completely, nor should it be. Such a goal is impossible and has the fetor of a hubris only a politician could entertain. Our government’s response should be to do exactly what this column said months ago. Our government should pool resources to respond to outbreaks, provide the latest recommendations, and provide the legal protection to allow Wisconsinites to continue to work. Other than that, our government should stay out of the way and let Wisconsinites manage their own lives.

 

Milwaukee Public Schools Abdicates Responsibility for Education

It is well documented that MPS’ “effort” at distance learning was a catastrophic failure. MPS is not willing or capable of doing it effectively. So what they are really saying here is that they want to enjoy a very long summer until they feel like going back to work. Why are all of us paying for this district if they aren’t going to provide an adequate education? I expect choice schools will see a boom in enrollment, and rightfully so.

MILWAUKEE — Milwaukee Public Schools leaders on Monday, July 13 released the district’s reopening plan and a phased-in reopening recommendation for the start of the 2020-21 school year that will be presented to the Milwaukee Board of School Directors — with a special board meeting set for Thursday, July 16 at 5:30 p.m. to further discuss the plan and vote on it. The plan, which applies to both early start and traditional students, calls for a virtual start to the school year — with no students in school buildings. Movement between phases would be based on COVID-19 spread.

[…]

The three-phase recommendation will be voted on during Thursday’s special board meeting:

– Phase 1: Full Remote Learning
– Phase 2: Hybrid Learning
– Phase 3: Face-to-Face Learning

The movement from one phase to the next will be dependent on monitoring the spread of COVID-19 as well as health and safety guidance.

Government ponders response as cases rise

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. I’ll get to the point:

The goal of our public policy was never to stop the virus completely, nor should it be. Such a goal is impossible and has the fetor of a hubris only a politician could entertain. Our government’s response should be to do exactly what this column said months ago. Our government should pool resources to respond to outbreaks, provide the latest recommendations, and provide the legal protection to allow Wisconsinites to continue to work. Other than that, our government should stay out of the way and let Wisconsinites manage their own lives.

 

Milwaukee Requires Masks

Nuts to that.

MILWAUKEE — The full Milwaukee Common Council voted 15-0 Monday, July 13 to approve Milwaukee’s proposed mask mandate ordinance — passed by the Milwaukee Common Council’s Public Safety and Health Committee Thursday, July 9. It now heads to Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett’s desk for his signature.

Some major modifications were made to the proposal leading up to Thursday’s committee vote. More than 600 people submitted a comment to the Public Safety and Health Committee, and just 26 more people supported the proposal than opposed it, similar to what FOX6 News heard along Milwaukee’s lakefront Sunday, on the eve of the full council’s vote.

[…]

The MKE Cares ordinance can be viewed here and requires masks for everyone three and older when inside buildings open to the public, and outside when within six feet of someone who is not a family member or member of your household.

I’ll share my view on masks… generally speaking, masks are useful in preventing the spread of airborne diseases in some circumstances. If I was in a high risk group, or if I am around people in a high risk group, then I might wear a mask in conjunction with keeping my distance and practicing sanitary practices.

I absolutely oppose the government – any government – mandating that we wear masks. In the same vein, I oppose them requiring me to wash my hands, keep my distance, wipe my ass, brush my teeth, or most other things. All of those things are great ideas, but outside the realm of government authority. Government’s job is to protect my rights. It is my job to protect my health.

One thing that is shocking, or perhaps not, is that the vote was unanimous. Clearly the population is not unanimous on this, so what does say about their representation?

BLM Astroturf in Wisconsin

All credit goes to commenter Mark for this one…

I wrote a post a couple of days ago about attending a BLM protest in Port Washington. In that post, I shared my observation that “most of the BLM organizers were young, white, and female.” It certainly didn’t seem like a local expression of outrage.

Mark pointed out in the comments that this was a group that had organized and the Washington County Daily News had a story on them. Here is that story:

WAUKESHA — A protest group called “Break the Silence in the Burbs” has scheduled protests into October in support of the Black Lives Matter movement throughout Washington County and southeastern Wisconsin. Organizer Brittany Vulich is inviting anyone that is interested in participating to request joining the group on Facebook, where more details on each of the protests will be posted and updated, including protest routes.

A request to join the Facebook group requires filling out answers to three questions.

The group has already organized three protests — in Grafton, Mequon, and, last Friday, in Menomonee Falls.

[…]

Upcoming protests include: Port Washington, July 10; Brookfield, July 17; Cedarburg, July 24; West Bend, July 31; Sheboygan, Aug. 7; Waukesha, Aug. 14; Lake Geneva, Aug. 21; Germantown, Aug. 28; New Berlin, Sept. 4; Fond du Lac, Sept. 11; Muskego, Sept. 18; Slinger/Hartford, Sept. 25; Wauwatosa, Oct. 2; Franklin, Oct. 9; Sussex, Oct. 16; Racine, Oct. 23; Fox Point, Oct. 30.

So it is clear that these protests in the burbs are being organized by this group. They are not organic to those communities. But who is organizing and why? Mark dug deeper regarding Ms. Vulich

According to her LinkedIn, she is a “field organizer” for “Organizing Together 2020”.  Also current experience as field organizer for “Emily Siegrest for Wisconsin State Assembly.”  Finance Director for “Jill for Justice for Wisconsin Supreme Court”. On the Board of “Environmental Caucus of Wisconsin Democrat Party”.

“Organizing for America 2020” booted up in January of this year.  Long before this BLM movement picked up the current momentum.

Looking at the video from the day, it looks like she is one of the two white girls leading the protest. It’s hard to tell with the mask. In any case, the whistle and bull horn are the tools of professional organizers.

So this particular BLM protest didn’t really have anything to do with black lives. It had everything to do with a well-funded effort by the Democrats to organize for the November election. Like usual, the Democrats are taking advantage of racial outrage to gain power for themselves. It’s an old playbook, but an effective one.

Lost in the Mail

This is one of the many, many reasons that we must not rely on mail-in voting. It is a viable alternate method of voting for the incapacitated or infirm, but not for regular voting.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Hundreds of absentee ballots in Wisconsin’s April primary election never made it to voters or went uncounted because of postmark problems, the U.S. Postal Service has reported.

The Postal Service’s internal watchdog found hundreds of ballots went undelivered due to election officials atbtempting to send absentee ballots to voters at the last minute, inconsistent postmarking and one mail carrier erroneously delivering outgoing absentee ballots back to the election office, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.

Court Reins In Governor’s Veto Power

Good.

A majority of justices could not agree on a rationale for why the three Evers vetoes were unconstitutional, finding generally that they created new law that the Legislature did not intend. The complex, 146-page ruling was limited to the four vetoes that were challenged and did not rein in the ability of future governors to make partial vetoes.

[…]
Two of the vetoes were overturned by the five-justice conservative majority, with two liberal justices dissenting. But a third veto that was overturned 4-3 saw conservative Chief Justice Pat Roggensack side with the two liberals on the losing side. And in upholding one Evers veto, three conservatives joined with two liberals in support.

BLM Protest in Port Washington

I found myself in Port Washington this evening to check out the scheduled BLM protest. Overall, it was a great display of Americans expressing themselves. It was peaceful and had some funny, some annoying, some touching, and some eye-rolling moments. There are a few pictures below, but here’s how it went down…

The BLM protest was scheduled from 6 PM to 9 PM. I was riding on my bike on the Interurban Trail and swung through downtown Port a little after 5 PM. There were several biker-looking guys getting American flags and a big banner out of their van. I asked about it and they said it was an All Lives Matter sign. They were planning to post somewhere along the route.

The plan for the BLM protest was to assemble at the Port Washington Veteran’s Memorial Park Bandshell at 6, then they would march through downtown for a while before returning to the Bandshell to wrap it up. When they started making speeches at about 6:20 (punctuality is clearly not a virtue to which they aspire), there were about 40 of them there. There were about 60 counter-protesters – some of whom were carrying firearms – assembled around. Some of the counter-protesters were standing close to the BLM folks and some were just standing back or sitting at picnic tables nearby. Additionally, there were several cars and motorcycles that kept driving by with American and/or Back the Blue flags flying.

Several of the BLM speakers then got up on stage and had their say. It was the normal stuff you would expect. Occasionally, some of the counter-protesters would shout out responses and the folks on stage jawed with them a bit. At one point, the counter-protesters broke out into the National Anthem. The BLM folks tried to shout them down by yelling “black lives matter” but gave up half way through.

After about 20 or 30 minutes of this, the BLM protesters set out on their march. They circled around the downtown a bit. Port Washington’s downtown is not very big. I sat and had an ice cream (caramel explosion in a waffle cone) and watched them go by a few times. Eventually they went back to the Bandshell. I walked over there and they were all kneeling, but I couldn’t hear what they were saying. There seemed to be a few more of them, but most of the counter-protesters were making their way to the local eating and drinking establishments. I went on my way home.

A couple of things stood out to me. First, most of the BLM organizers were young, white, and female. They seemed to be more professional agitators than local aggrieved people. Maybe not, but that was my impression. There was one politician in there who referred to her constituents, but I couldn’t tell who it was. Second, I was really impressed by the Port Washington police. They were polite and professional to everyone. They didn’t interfere with anyone having their say but were visible. They were chatting with people on all sides. Really good work.

It was refreshing to see Americans having a public discussion.

 

Ozaukee County Cancels Fair

From the Washington County Insider.

A portion of the announcement reads:  “We will not be utilizing Firemen’s Park this year for any events, we will not have food vendors or any shows which the public can attend.

“The Fair Board met this week and decided to limit this year’s Fair to the judging of 4-H and Open Class exhibits and holding the traditional livestock and small animal auctions. Attendance will therefore be limited to those necessary events and will not be open to the public.”

The Ozaukee County Fair Board of Directors cited “recommendations from the health department” as its primary reason for canceling the 2020 fair.

Vendors said they had been informed of the closure earlier this week.

We are quickly learning which people are “can do” and which ones are “wont’t do.”

Court Upholds Law

I must say, AP reporter Scott Bauer has gotten worse and worse. He doesn’t even attempt to write an unbiased story. Check out the overtly loaded language. But as for the story itself, good.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The conservative-controlled Wisconsin Supreme Court on Thursday upheld Republican-authored lame-duck laws that stripped power from the incoming Democratic attorney general just before he took office in 2019.

The justices rejected arguments that the laws were unconstitutional, handing another win to Republicans who have scored multiple high-profile victories before the court in recent years.

The 5-2 ruling marks the second time that the court has upheld the lame-duck laws passed in December 2018, just weeks before Gov. Tony Evers and Attorney General Josh Kaul, both Democrats, took office. The actions in Wisconsin mirrored Republican moves after losing control of the governors’ offices in Michigan in November 2018 and in North Carolina in 2016. Democrats decried the tactics as brazen attempts to hold onto power after losing elections.

[…]

Thursday’s ruling involved a case filed by a coalition of labor unions led by the State Employees International Union. The coalition argued that the laws give the Legislature power over the attorney general’s office and that this violates the separation of powers doctrine in the state constitution.

The laws prohibit Evers from ordering Kaul to withdraw from lawsuits, let legislators intervene in lawsuits using their own attorneys rather than Kaul’s state Department of Justice lawyers, and force Kaul to get permission from the Legislature’s Republican-controlled budget committee before settling lawsuits.

Republicans designed the laws to prohibit Evers from pulling Wisconsin out of a multistate lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, and to ensure that they have a say in court if Kaul chooses not to defend GOP-authored laws.

Washington County Reaffirms Oath

We’ll see how firm they are when the rubber hits the road, but it is good to see them on the right side of the Constitution.

WEST BEND — The Washington County Board of Supervisors on Wednesday unanimously approved 2020 Resolution 17 — Washington County Advocates the Constitutional Rights of its Citizens.

The resolution reaffirms the oath county supervisors took upon swearing in to uphold rights of Washington County residents under the U.S. Constitution.

According to the resolution, “We the People” affirms the U.S. government exists to serve the nation’s people and “We the People hold dear and sacred and challenge all those who would seek to infringe upon the rights of the people.”

[…]

“We want to make sure the oath you took on day one, that’s something you’re committed to despite what other government bodies try to do,” said Kelling. ”We are going to hold true to the Constitution. We are going to fight for it on every level at every opportunity. This is who we are. This is one of the most conservative counties in Wisconsin. Who would lead if not us?”

Columbus Removes Columbus

I look forward to driving by Woke, Wisconsin, in the future.

MADISON – Leaders of a small Wisconsin city named after Christopher Columbus voted this week to remove a monument to its namesake, joining legions of government officials grappling with how to recognize American history while acknowledging its flaws.

The statue of Christopher Columbus has stood in a major thoroughfare at the intersection of two highways in Columbus — about 27 miles northeast of Madison — for three decades.

That’s changing after the Columbus Common Council voted 4-1 on Tuesday to remove the statue from its prominent location and put it in storage until officials can find a new home for it.

The removal comes after a Columbus High School student, Abbi Adams, started a petition following the death of George Floyd, a Black man who was killed by a white police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes while arresting him.

Washington County To Consider Becoming Sanctuary City

A few months ago, I would have yawned at something like this as just some showmanship and pandering. In our new normal, as they say, affirming our rights has become paramount. Let’s get this done!

WEST BEND — Washington County Board District 6 Supervisor and Vice Chair Denis Kelling has introduced 2020 Resolution 17 — Washington County Advocates the Constitutional Rights of Citizens on July 4. Supervisors will vote on the resolution during Wednesday’s County Board meeting.

The resolution would oppose any mandates which may interfere with an individual’s constitutional rights, including requiring residents to wear masks, enforce closures and implement fines. The resolution, which was

approved by the Executive Committee on June 17, reaffirms the oath each supervisor takes upon swearing in to the board to support the national and state constitutions.

“The government doesn’t have the right to make those types of mandates,” Kelling said. While the government can issue emergency orders, he does not agree that some measures must be mandated.

Earlier this year, Waukesha County supervisors proposed a resolution that would make it a sanctuary county for the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in response to state proposals to strengthen background checks for purchasing guns. Supervisors felt these proposals violated the Second Amendment rights of citizens.

Washington County supervisors wanted to create a resolution to reaffirm the whole U.S. Constitution.

“I can’t recall any time in history where the government had a right to demand that you wear something,” said Kelling.

Middleton Enacts “Unlawful” Restrictions

There is a huge disconnect between the draconian laws that we are expected to obey and fact that the government is letting protesters and rioters ignore all of the laws. Equal application of the law is a fundamental pillar of a free society. And yes, Middleton does not have the legal authority to enact these restrictions.

MIDDLETON, Wis. (WMTV) – The Tavern League of Wisconsin is calling restrictions on bars and restaurants “unlawful,” after public health officials announced a new emergency order Wednesday to slow the spread of coronavirus.

At restaurants, the restriction (Emergency Order #7) brings indoor dining capacity down from 50 percent to 25 percent. Bars can no longer allow indoor dining, only takeout and outdoor seating with physical distancing.

Janel Heinrich, the director of Public Health Madison & Dane County, said that the county has experienced a high number of cases recently. She also said that contact tracers found much of the spread has come from public gatherings, restaurants and bars.

Back to school

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News this week:

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction has released an 87-page guidance for reopening K-12 schools this fall. The responsibility and plans for reopening actually falls to each individual public school district or private school, but the DPI offered a wide array of options for how to mitigate the risk of spreading COVID-19 while still educating kids.

Before getting into the details a bit on what schools could, and should, do to reopen, we must pause and come to agreement on a few underlying facts. First, while COVID-19 can be deadly for older people and those with underlying health conditions, it is exceedingly rare for people under the age of 20 to die from it. Far more of our children die from suicide, drug overdoses, traffic accidents, diarrheal diseases, cancer, or heart disease than from COVID-19. That is not to say that kids will not have serious complications or be carriers of the disease, but they are not at a high risk of dying from it. The school staff, however, are in a different risk category.

Second, education is a priority. This has become even clearer as we see wave after wave of ignorance-fueled hate wash over our communities. Education is a cure to a lot of social ills including bigotry, hubris, and avarice. Education is not only a well-trod path for individual success, it is the prerequisite for an advanced civilization. Some may have forgotten or ignored the importance of education in the panic over COVID-19, but we must not lose sight of it again. COVID-19 will be here forevermore and we may never have a vaccine. We must not let it lead to the abandonment of our kids’ education.

As schools get back to their mission this September, the DPI provides a number of different scenarios to consider depending on the grade level. These options include a four-day week, a two-day rotation, and a two-week rotation — all of which would be supplemented and supported by distance learning techniques and robust parental support. All of these options are designed to limit the number of kids in the school buildings and the time they spend there. What is conspicuously missing from the DPI’s guidance is a traditional five-day, in-person school week.

If there is anything we learned from the last few months in education, it is that for most kids, classroom teaching is the most effective way of delivering education. Some did great at distance learning, but many kids were left behind. And for some school districts, those kids were intentionally left behind as teachers failed to adapt to a different education delivery style.

Even in the Slinger School District, which was reputedly one of the districts that successfully pivoted to distance learning, a district survey revealed that 51.7% of respondents said their kids spent less than two hours a day learning. An overwhelming 76.1% of respondents are in favor of returning to a traditional, in-classroom learning environment.

School Districts throughout the state should get back to the business of educating kids on a full-time basis. There will need to be some reasonable changes to mitigate the spread of disease, whether it is COVID-19 or something else. Rigorous sanitation, routine hand washing, masks where appropriate, and quickly sending sick kids and staff members home should become the norm, but so should rigorous and routine education.

Also, accommodations must be made for kids and staff members who are at a higher risk by providing real distance learning alternatives. This does not mean broadcasting a class that is usually delivered in the classroom and sending some worksheets. This means designing education specifically to be delivered remotely. There are already several online public and private schools in Wisconsin that do a phenomenal job educating kids who learn better outside of the classroom. Wisconsin must learn from these schools, amplify their success, and waive restrictions to allow kids to transfer into those schools immediately.

Wisconsinites invest a tremendous amount of money, time, and effort into our K-12 education system precisely because we believe in the necessity and promise of education. It is past time for them to get back to doing the work our kids deserve.

Back to School

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. We must open the schools:

School Districts throughout the state should get back to the business of educating kids on a full-time basis. There will need to be some reasonable changes to mitigate the spread of disease, whether it is COVID-19 or something else. Rigorous sanitation, routine hand washing, masks where appropriate, and quickly sending sick kids and staff members home should become the norm, but so should rigorous and routine education.

Also, accommodations must be made for kids and staff members who are at a higher risk by providing real distance learning alternatives. This does not mean broadcasting a class that is usually delivered in the classroom and sending some worksheets. This means designing education specifically to be delivered remotely. There are already several online public and private schools in Wisconsin that do a phenomenal job educating kids who learn better outside of the classroom. Wisconsin must learn from these schools, amplify their success, and waive restrictions to allow kids to transfer into those schools immediately.

Wisconsinites invest a tremendous amount of money, time, and effort into our K-12 education system precisely because we believe in the necessity and promise of education. It is past time for them to get back to doing the work our kids deserve.

Madison Schools Kick Out Cops

Brilliant /sarcasm

Three hundred and eighty-five days.

That’s the difference between the Madison School Board approving a contract to place police officers in each of its four comprehensive high schools for three years, and the board voting to end that contract immediately.

In an illustration of how local activism and a national movement can combine to reshape policy, board members took a major step toward removing officers from from schools Monday night. The vote was unanimous.

Last year, the contract was approved on a 4 to 3 vote, with Nicki Vander Meulen, Ali Muldrow and Ananda Mirilli opposed. Savion Castro and Christina Gomez-Schmidt are new to the board since then. Gloria Reyes, a former police officer, changed her stance recently amid ongoing community activism and Cris Carusi changed her vote from last year given recent events.

[…]

It remains unclear how security will be handled this fall, but the district has been working toward including a pay raise and opportunities for advancement for its School Security Assistants in the 2020-21 budget. They hope that will help keep turnover rates low and make the positions more attractive.

[…]

Police have been stationed in Madison schools since the 1990s, with proponents highlighting the relationships the officers could establish with students and the need to have an officer on site in case of a school shooter or other emergency.

It’s all virtue signaling and fun until that next school shooting.