Category Archives: Politics – Wisconsin

Newburg Eliminates Ethics Code and Abolishes Ethics Commission

Some day, I would love to spend some time to understand all of the backstory in Newburg. Essentially, it looks like a couple of families with deep grudges who are warring against each other in local government. The result is that it makes Newburg look like a backward hillbilly hamlet where they have failed the experiment of self-governance.

NEWBURG — Elected village officials here late Thursday agreed to abolish Newburg’s Ethics Commission and eliminate its own ethics code.

The unanimous vote — two Village Board members were absent — would put most future ethics disputes in the hands of the local district attorney or the state’s attorney general.

The move came roughly a month after the commission’s own chairman, Mike Heili, had sought to accuse village President Rena Chesak of perjury. That accusation came after Heili raised issues with statements he said Chesak had made at an ethics hearing he oversaw earlier this year.

But the attempted complaint — Deanna Alexander, Newburg’s interim administrator and clerk, has said the filing by Heili wasn’t notarized and that she planned to return it to him — had raised ethics issues of its own.

Besides filing an ethics dispute that his own commission would have ostensibly overseen — making for a potential conflict of interest, Alexander has said — Heili had also apparently raised questions about his impartiality this year when Alexander reported he’d suggested plans to continue filing more complaints against Chesak.

“There was concern expressed by multiple trustees regarding the ethics commission and the fact that it has more or less — it’s become overused,” village Attorney Ian Prust said moments after board members exited closed-session talks on the matter, and just before they voted to abolish the commission.

“It’s become a tool for different people to seek political retribution against other individuals,” Prust continued, “and they’re incredibly concerned about the cost of the ethics proceedings happening on a regular basis.”

Bill Introduced to Have Taxpayers Provide Feminine Hygiene Products

Don’t get too worked up. This bill isn’t going anywhere in a sane Assembly. But it is worth noting that this is the priority of Melissa Sargent and the Democratic Party in Wisconsin.

MADISON, Wis. – Menstrual products would be more easily accessible in state and local buildings, as well as schools under a new bill a Democratic state lawmaker is introducing.

Rep. Melissa Sargent said menstrual products are “not a luxury good, nor a government handout” in a news release.

“Menstrual products are necessities, not luxuries, and the over 50% of the population who menstruate here in Wisconsin should not have to continue to face the undue and unjust burdens of inaccessibility to essential hygiene products,” Sargent said in the release.

The bill requires that restrooms in buildings owned, leased or occupied by the state and local governments have tampons or pads available at no charge.

School districts, charter schools and private schools in a parental choice program would also be required to have tampons and pads available for free in bathrooms under the bill.

I would note that less than 50% of people menstruate… kids and post-menopausal women and whatnot. But that’s neither here nor there.

This is part of the continuing thrust of socialists to make people dependent on government for everything. No, menstrual products are not a luxury good. The same argument could be made for toothpaste, deodorant, hair products, razors, or any other hygiene product. And that’s the point. If Sargent has her say, we’d probably get to the point where government provides everything – after extracting money from the people to pay for it. Of course, it is not the responsibility of taxpayers to provide any of that for people.

Frankly, I get sick and tired of socialist politicians infantilizing people. Fer cripes’ sake, we aren’t children and we can buy our own $#(@*&! hygiene products. But socialists don’t see people that way. People can’t be mature and take care of themselves. They are sheep who are too stupid, lazy, or immature to take care of themselves. They need their betters to use the violent coercive force of government to provide for their needs.

I hope Sargent gets an earful from women who say, “I’m a grown a$$ woman and can buy my own hygiene products.”

Taxpayers on Hook for $110,000 to Jailed Felon

Sigh… government screws up and it’s always the taxpayer left to pay the bill.

WAUSHARA COUNTY, Wis. (WBAY) – A Wisconsin prison inmate is receiving tens of thousands of dollars from the state as the result of a federal lawsuit settlement over what’s been dubbed “The Rat Emoji Incident.”

Taxpayers are footing the bill for that $110,000 settlement. There may be more to come.The lawsuit stems from an incident at Redgranite Correctional Institution. Target 2 Investigates uncovered the story in January.A now-former corrections sergeant at the prison exposed the identity of five inmates who were acting as confidential informants in a high-profile undercover gang investigation by placing pictures or rats next to their names.

“To be honest with you, it was rage. Rage,” former prison gang investigator Jason Wilke says was his first reaction after learning criminal charges were never filed against the sergeant.

One of the inmates filed a federal civil rights lawsuit and the state decided to settle. He’s serving time for armed robbery, and getting a big payout from taxpayers.

AG Kaul Praises Budget

I guess today is going to be all about finding those rare nuggets of praise from liberals.

RHINELANDER – Wisconsin will add more than 60 assistant district attorneys and nearly double the hourly pay of public defenders from $40 an hour to $70.Attorney General Josh Kaul told Newswatch 12 during a stop in Rhinelander on Thursday he considers those changes some of the best ones made in a state budget in decades, if not ever.

Forest and Langlade Counties will directly benefit.  Each will add an assistant prosecutor.  It’s the largest increase in such jobs in Wisconsin since 2007.

Kaul thinks those steps will help lead to more of a focus on prosecuting sex crimes after he and former Attorney General Brad Schimel pushed to clear a backlog of untested rape kits.

RBG Praises Trump Appointees

Remember how much the liberals tried to smear and trash these good, decent, smart men? It was all a farce. Tip o’ the ol’ hat to RBG for being decent to decent people.

Washington (CNN)Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg came to the defense of her more conservative colleagues on the bench, Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.

“I can say that my two newest colleagues are very decent and very smart individuals,” she said Wednesday at an event in Washington, D.C., hosted by Duke Law as she answered questions from Neil Siegel, a law professor and one of her former law clerks.
Now that the Supreme Court term has ended, Ginsburg, 86, has been pushing back against criticism of the court, saying in a recent interview with NPR that the nine justices work well together and rebutted the idea that the Supreme Court is a partisan institution, according to the news outlet.

Live Stream of Public Hearing for POWTS

The Washington County Insider is live streaming the Washington County Parks Department hearing about the proposed new POWTS fee (see column yesterday). They are currently on a break because there are so many people there that they broke the fire code! Good job, neighbors.

Anyway, so far the comments have been very eloquent and truly express the frustration that people have with governments that just keep jacking up costs without adding any value.

Anyway, this is a fantastic example of representative government in action. Tune in.

Restart of broadcast

Schools Have Enough Money

State Senator Duey Stroebel penned a column in response to a recent article in the Washington County Daily News where the Kewaskum Schools were whining about not getting as much state aid as they wanted. While Stroebel uses Kewaskum as the example, he brings up some important points that are applicable across Wisconsin.

From a common-sense standpoint, state and local funding for schools is also on a per-student basis. Dollars are tied to how many students a district educates. Kewaskum enrollment has fallen 236 students from a high of 2,050 students in 2008-09 to 1,814 students in 2018-19. Clearly a 12.5 percent,

or oneeighth, reduction in enrollment should impact finances. According to documents on the Kewaskum School Board website, the 2016-17 school year had a general fund budget of $19.62 million, with an enrollment of 1,844.

The recently finished 2018-19 school year had a general fund budget of $20.78 million with 1,814 students. That is an increase in spending of 5.9 percent over two years while enrollment fell 1.6 percent.

Given current demographics, we can expect flat to declining enrollment to continue throughout Wisconsin. It is up to local school boards, and those they employ, to scale costs and ensure a quality product. Nothing we do at the state level can force a school district to prudently control costs or invest funding in the most critical areas. Every community must ask if each budget item improves educational performance and graduation rates.

Last, but not least, communities can go to referendum. The same cost and education-result questions should be asked on those occasions.

POWTS Fee Opposition

Thanks to an alert county resident who pointed me to this link. On Washington County’s website, you can find 146 pages of letters from county residents regarding the proposed POWTS fee referenced in my column. Interestingly, the email that I sent to my county supervisor is not there. I wonder how many others are missing.

Let’s just say that the people are not amused.

The hearing for this is tomorrow morning at 7:35 if you are able to attend.

No new fees

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News yesterday.

Perhaps taking their cue from the Republicans in the Legislature, the Washington County Board is considering implementing a new fee on Washington County taxpayers to do something that the county has already been doing for nearly 20 years. The public hearing being held by the Washington County Planning and Parks Department is at 7:35 a.m. on Thursday. Since, like many people, I work and cannot attend a public meeting at 7:35 a.m. on a weekday, I will offer some thoughts in this space.

The new fee being considered is to pay for tracking the maintenance of private onsite wastewater treatment systems (POWTS). Much of Washington County is rural and residents do not have access to municipal sewer systems, so they install and maintain a private septic system. There are about 20,312 parcels in the county with a POWTS. The state has mandated since 2000 that counties track and report to make sure that these private systems are properly maintained. Washington County has been complying with this state mandate with the use of general county funds since then. The new annual fee being considered is $11 for the vast majority of POWTS owners.

The POWTS tracking system is fairly rudimentary. Every three years, the county sends a postcard reminder to the POWTS owners to remind them that they need to have their system maintained. The POWTS owner contracts with a private company that inspects the system, completes any necessary maintenance or cleaning, and then notifies the county that it is complete. The POWTS owner bears the cost of all of this.

Philosophically, there is nothing wrong with a fee to fund a government service. The difference between a fee and a tax is that a fee is usually voluntary and charged to the specific person who is receiving the direct benefit of the service. For example, a fee for a marriage license is perfectly reasonable. The couple getting married is receiving the direct benefit of the county service and there is no rational reason that all of the other taxpayers should bear the burden.

In the case of a new POWTS maintenance fee, it is not voluntary and the entire county is receiving the benefit. For the vast majority of POWTS owners, it is not optional. There are not any other waste treatment options available to them, so they must install and maintain a POWTS at their own expense. The purpose of the government tracking the maintenance of them is to help ensure that the water supply for all county residents is not unduly polluted. Given that the fee is not optional for POWTS owners and every county taxpayer is receiving the benefit, the fee being proposed would be more correctly described as a selective tax.

Furthermore, remember that this is a service that the county has been providing for nearly 20 years. As they consider supporting this service with a standalone fee, there has not been any corollary proposal to reduce the county property tax levy or sales tax by a corresponding amount. The fee is just in addition to all of the other taxes that county taxpayers are already paying. As presented, this is not a discussion about whether or not this particular service should be funded with a fee or the general tax. It is about whether the county should charge a fee for something they were already doing and then just use the liberated general tax revenue to spend on something else. It is a straightforward path to more spending.

Finally, one must really question the cost. At $11 per parcel, the proposed fee would raise roughly $230,000 per year. Look back at the third paragraph for how this program works. It is sending a postcard every three years and logging that the work is complete. It is something that could be completed by an intern with a spreadsheet. $230,000 per year?

In the program cost detail shared by the Planning and Parks Department, the annual program cost is actually listed at $227,527.28. Only $2,200 is allocated for printing, copying, and postage. The rest is for wages ($126,370), overtime ($400), benefits ($45,100.60), advertising ($300), office supplies ($600), vehicles ($6,300), conference fees ($1,400), cost allocation for planning ($25,578), and on and on. That is a tremendous amount of overhead and larded-up costs for a very, very simple POWTS maintenance program. I find it difficult to imagine why POWTS owners should be charged an extra fee to shoulder the costs of things like conference fees and advertising.

The proposed POWTS fee looks suspiciously like another money grab by a government to continue to fund bloat and waste. The Washington County Board should categorically reject it and apologize to the taxpayers for ever suggesting it.

Principal’s Untimely Resignation Linked to “Little Penis”

Wha!?!?

TOWN OF LISBON – Former Silver Spring Intermediate School Principal Mark Peperkorn’s resignation was connected to an incident where he allegedly read a finger puppet parody book titled the “Little Penis” to staff members and the superintendent, according to documents obtained by The Freeman via an open records request.

The open records request revealed that Peperkorn, who was the principal of Pilgrim Park Middle School, was at a meeting when he read aloud a book he had previously confiscated from a student.

Peperkorn took a position as principal at Silver Spring Intermediate School in the Hamilton School District and would have started July 1, but he resigned June 14.

A letter addressed to PPMS families states that he had accelerated his resignation in Elmbrook to May 31 due to “unforeseen circumstances.”

[…]

One staff member said the following: “He probably felt comfortable with his staff but in this day and age it is not okay. He has been well-respected in his former district and interviewed very well with us, so I hate someone’s complete career (to) go down the drain for reading a book. If he were to stay on, I would welcome and support him professionally.”

One staff member said Peperkorn had a box full of confiscated items that he shared with staff members during the meeting. As he pulled items out of the box, Peperkorn named whom the items belonged to, according to a redacted interview with a staff member.

Another staff member said the reading of the book wasn’t as offensive as Peperkorn stating the names of students whom the items belonged to as he removed them from a box in front of staff.

“However, mentioning students real names and their middle school misgivings was much more offensive. One of those students was one of my former special education students, so hurtful. I am also very good friends with another one of the other student’s parents mentioned in your precised jokes, so unprofessional.”

No New Fees

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. Here’s a taste:

Perhaps taking their cue from the Republicans in the Legislature, the Washington County Board is considering implementing a new fee on Washington County taxpayers to do something that the county has already been doing for nearly 20 years. The public hearing being held by the Washington County Planning and Parks Department is at 7:35 a.m. on Thursday. Since, like many people, I work and cannot attend a public meeting at 7:35 a.m. on a weekday, I will offer some thoughts in this space.

The new fee being considered is to pay for tracking the maintenance of private onsite wastewater treatment systems (POWTS). Much of Washington County is rural and residents do not have access to municipal sewer systems, so they install and maintain a private septic system. There are about 20,312 parcels in the county with a POWTS. The state has mandated since 2000 that counties track and report to make sure that these private systems are properly maintained. Washington County has been complying with this state mandate with the use of general county funds since then. The new annual fee being considered is $11 for the vast majority of POWTS owners.

[…]

As presented, this is not a discussion about whether or not this particular service should be funded with a fee or the general tax. It is about whether the county should charge a fee for something they were already doing and then just use the liberated general tax revenue to spend on something else. It is a straightforward path to more spending.

Finally, one must really question the cost. At $11 per parcel, the proposed fee would raise roughly $230,000 per year. Look back at the third paragraph for how this program works. It is sending a postcard every three years and logging that the work is complete. It is something that could be completed by an intern with a spreadsheet. $230,000 per year?

In the program cost detail shared by the Planning and Parks Department, the annual program cost is actually listed at $227,527.28. Only $2,200 is allocated for printing, copying, and postage. The rest is for wages ($126,370), overtime ($400), benefits ($45,100.60), advertising ($300), office supplies ($600), vehicles ($6,300), conference fees ($1,400), cost allocation for planning ($25,578), and on and on. That is a tremendous amount of overhead and larded-up costs for a very, very simple POWTS maintenance program. I find it difficult to imagine why POWTS owners should be charged an extra fee to shoulder the costs of things like conference fees and advertising.

The proposed POWTS fee looks suspiciously like another money grab by a government to continue to fund bloat and waste. The Washington County Board should categorically reject it and apologize to the taxpayers for ever suggesting it.

Wisconsin Democracy Campaign Beclowns Themselves

Follow the “logic”

The Wisconsin Democracy Campaign has long maintained that the veto power in the hands of the Wisconsin governor is excessive and is contrary to how the legislative process should work in a democracy.

Governors of both political parties have often used their veto power to change the intent of the legislation that lands on their desks and to increase spending.

This amounts to taking powers that properly should reside in the hands of the legislature.

Agreed. So far, so good.

The Wisconsin Democracy Campaign believes that any governor, when he or she is exercising a line-item veto, must veto each item or appropriation in its entirety rather than using “creative editing” to construct a bill, or a section of a bill, that was not the intent of the legislature.

Still good.

The Wisconsin Democracy Campaign recognizes the hypocrisy of Republican officials who only now are aghast at the governor’s veto power when they had no problem with that power when the governor was from their own party.

What’s more, the current proposal from Sen. Dave Craig and Rep. Mike Kuglitsch is only concerned with the governor using the veto power to increase expenditures rather than to alter the meaning of legislation.

For this reason, the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign is neither endorsing nor opposing the Craig/Kuglitsch bill.

Wha!?!? So they agree that the veto should be eliminated, but they don’t like Republicans’ hypocrisy and the amendment doesn’t go far enough. Um, why not support the move in the right direction even if it doesn’t go as far as they want? And who cares about the motive? Better government for the wrong reason is still better government.

Veto reform is badly needed

Here is my full column that ran in the Washington County Daily News yesterday:

When the Wisconsin Legislature passed the state budget, it already had an irresponsible $500 million spending increase for K-12 education. With a stroke of his pen, Governor Evers used his powerful veto to increase spending by another $87 million. Now some lawmakers are proposing reining in the Wisconsin governor’s ability to use a veto to increase spending.

Governor Evers and his comrades have decried the attempt to curb the governor’s veto power as a partisan endeavor. Perhaps it is. And perhaps it would have been a worthwhile reform when one part controlled the legislative and executive branches. Even so, it often takes the abuse of power to spark reform, and this reform is badly needed.

Wisconsin’s governor has the most powerful veto pen in the nation. Forty-four states give their governor some form of line item veto authority, but they all have restrictions. Wisconsin’s governor has the fewest restrictions. He or she can veto numbers, strike out individual words, edit the meaning of sentences, and even arbitrarily reduce appropriated amounts. Up until 2008, when the voters last reformed the veto power, the governor could even strike out individual letters to create new words.

This vast veto authority gives Wisconsin’s governor an extraordinary amount of power to essentially write legislation by carving up what the Legislature sends to his or her desk. While it is true that the Legislature can override a veto by a twothirds majority, it rarely happens due to the high electoral bar.

There is an argument that governors should not have a line item veto at all. The governors of six states and the president of the United States do not have a line item veto authority. When a bill reaches their desks, they must veto the bill in its entirety or allow it to become law.

Our federal Constitution, which also served as a model for many state constitutions, was predicated on the notion that concentrated power is injurious to liberty. That is why our three branches of government are integrated with a complex system of checks and balances that are meant to assure that no one branch, and certainly no one person, can wield too much power.

While in theory, a line item veto can be overridden as easily as a full veto, the real world disproves that theory. Legislation – particularly a budget – is always the amalgamation of a thousand different compromises. Any final piece of legislation has been put through the grinder of legislative committees, public hearings, and two houses of the legislature. By the time it reaches the governor’s desk, a piece of legislation is a network of interdependent priorities and conditions. When a governor vetoes a part of the legislation, it short circuits the network and undermines the legislature’s intent. Since a partial veto only strikes out a piece of the compromise, there are rarely enough votes behind an individual item in a bill to override the governor’s veto.

The constitutional amendment being circulated by Sen. David Craig and Rep. Mike Kuglitsch does not even approach eliminating the governor’s line item veto. Their amendment would simply prohibit the ability of the governor to use a veto to increase spending. The rationale is simple. No single person in government should have the power to spend $87 million on their own authority.

That is entirely too much power for one person to have over his fellow citizens. Our state constitution explicitly grants the power to appropriate money for precisely the reason that spending decisions should be subject to a rigorous legislative process and not be the subject to the arbitrary whims of a solitary governor.

The process to amend the state’s constitution is, rightly, a lengthy one. The amendment must pass both houses of the legislature in two consecutive sessions. Then the amendment must pass a statewide referendum. Fortunately, the governor is not involved in the amendment process.

Wisconsin’s governor’s veto authority makes him or her too powerful. It was true for Governor Walker. It is true for Governor Evers. It will be true for the next governor. It will be true for the one after that unless we change it. Taking a small step to limit that veto authority is not a partisan issue. It is just a simple reform to make a better government.

Veto reform is badly needed

My column for the Washington County Daily News is online and in print. Here’s a taste:

When the Wisconsin Legislature passed the state budget, it already had an irresponsible $500 million spending increase for K-12 education. With a stroke of his pen, Governor Evers used his powerful veto to increase spending by another $87 million. Now some lawmakers are proposing reining in the Wisconsin governor’s ability to use a veto to increase spending.

Governor Evers and his comrades have decried the attempt to curb the governor’s veto power as a partisan endeavor. Perhaps it is. And perhaps it would have been a worthwhile reform when one part controlled the legislative and executive branches. Even so, it often takes the abuse of power to spark reform, and this reform is badly needed.

[…]

The constitutional amendment being circulated by Sen. David Craig and Rep. Mike Kuglitsch does not even approach eliminating the governor’s line item veto. Their amendment would simply prohibit the ability of the governor to use a veto to increase spending. The rationale is simple. No single person in government should have the power to spend $87 million on their own authority.

That is entirely too much power for one person to have over his fellow citizens. Our state constitution explicitly grants the power to appropriate money for precisely the reason that spending decisions should be subject to a rigorous legislative process and not be the subject to the arbitrary whims of a solitary governor.

The process to amend the state’s constitution is, rightly, a lengthy one. The amendment must pass both houses of the legislature in two consecutive sessions. Then the amendment must pass a statewide referendum. Fortunately, the governor is not involved in the amendment process.

Wisconsin’s governor’s veto authority makes him or her too powerful. It was true for Governor Walker. It is true for Governor Evers. It will be true for the next governor. It will be true for the one after that unless we change it. Taking a small step to limit that veto authority is not a partisan issue. It is just a simple reform to make a better government.

 

Attorney General Asks for Input

While I applaud the effort at transparency, why would he need to solicit comments from the public about opinions? I thought that the AG was supposed to offer legal opinions based on the law – not public opinion.

MADISON, Wis. – Attorney General Josh Kaul today unveiled a new process and website for all Wisconsinites to provide information and perspectives on proposed Attorney General Opinion topics prior to the beginning of the Department of Justice drafting process. The new Wisconsin Department of Justice (DOJ) webpage, doj.state.wi.us/OpinionRequests gives anyone the opportunity to weigh in on issues facing opinion review.

“With the changes announced today, we are making the AG opinion process transparent and open to input from the public,” said Attorney General Kaul.

With the new website, all commentary submitted will now be open to public review through the public records process. Public records requests can be made through the Department of Justice Office of Open Government by phone, mail or online. More information about making a public records request can be found here.

By statute, the Attorney General must, when asked, provide the legislature and designated Wisconsin state government officials with an opinion on legal questions. The Attorney General may also give formal legal opinions to district attorneys and county corporation counsel under certain circumstances. Wis. Stat. § 165.25(3) and 59.42(1)(c). Please see 77 Op. Att’y Gen. Preface (1988) for a more detailed explanation of the criteria for requesting a formal opinion.

Scott Walker Takes New Job and Won’t Run for Office

I wish him and his family the very best. This sounds like a good gig for his strengths.

Former Republican Gov. Scott Walker announced plans Monday to serve full-time as president of a national conservative youth organization and ruled out the possibility of him seeking political office in the next five years.

The board of directors of the Young America’s Foundation elected Walker to become president of the group in early 2021 when YAF’s current president will step down after more than 40 years.

YAF works to promote conservative ideas among young people.

This clears the way for someone to take the mantle in Wisconsin. Who will it be?

Madison Slaps Down on Catholic High School

Wow. Way to use a BS technicality to hassle a Catholic High School, Madison.

Edgewood High School was evaluating its options, including possible legal action, a day after Madison’s Zoning Board of Appeals decided the school’s athletic teams can no longer do something they have been doing for more than 90 years: Play games on the school’s athletic field.

School President Michael Elliott said Edgewood officials are “incredibly disappointed” after the board voted 4-0 late Thursday to affirm that the school’s master plan allows for only physical-education classes and practices — but not games or matches against other schools — at the school’s Goodman Athletic Complex.

[…]

Thursday’s decision hinged on wording in the school’s 2014 master plan that describes the intended use of the field as being for athletic practices and gym classes — without mentioning competitions.

Tucker said that within the plan, the school is required to explain the intended use of any space. Any uses that are not covered need additional approval from the city’s Plan Commission. Since competitions are not specified in the plan, Tucker said, the school needs to go through this approval process.

But Edgewood attorney Matt Lee and two other attorneys arguing on Edgewood’s behalf said there are other areas of the master plan that explain the space was meant for competitions.

In UW-Madison’s master plan, Lee said, the Natatorium and Goodman Softball Complex are both zoned recreational. He said the facilities host swim meets and competitive softball games, respectively.

Lee also noted that “classes and practices” was not meant to be an exhaustive list of all activities on the field.

Board members disagreed.

Sensenbrenner Pushed for Ratification of Trade Deal

I don’t know that it will result in accelerating our economic boom, but inaction is certainly crippling.

This new trade deal is good for America. I’m encouraged that the Mexican Senate overwhelmingly ratified the USMCA in June and that President Trump has met with Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau recently in Washington to shore up more support for the agreement. Now, the United States must act. House Democrats, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, must bring the USMCA before the House for immediate consideration. There should be no delay.

Failure to do so will leave American workers and businesses playing by an outdated set of rules as our foreign competitors move on without us.

I am hearing from small business owners, farmers, young people entering the workforce, and families who want us to rebalance our trade agreements and keep strengthening the American economy with balanced trade rules. Let’s get it done now.

Kewaskum Looking for New School Board Member

The most interesting part is that he sold his home in 2 hours! Housing is still hot.

KEWASKUM — The Kewaskum School Board is looking for a replacement after member Jay Fischer resigned Monday.

He wrote a letter to board President Mark Sette and fellow board members explaining his decision, and asked for a day to call the members himself before the information was shared.

“The reason for my resignation is that we will be downsizing our home situation and relocating out of the district,” he wrote. After another child graduated and moved out, he and his wife wanted a smaller home, and sold theirs in less than two hours.

Amending Governor’s Powerful Veto

Governor Baldauff isn’t wrong.

Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ spokeswoman is calling a Republican proposal to limit his partial veto powers a “temper tantrum.”

Republicans have introduced a constitutional amendment prohibit the governor from increasing funding levels in bills that appropriate money. The move comes after Democratic Gov. Tony Evers used his partial veto powers last week to increase funding for K-12 schools by $65 million in the state budget.

Evers’ spokeswoman, Melissa Baldauff, said in an email that the amendment is a “temper tantrum” in response to Evers using his partial veto authority to bring the budget closer to want people wanted. She says Republicans are sore losers who want to change the rules whenever they don’t get their way.

The problem is that whoever proposed amending the governor’s veto powers will be accused of throwing a tantrum or political gamesmanship because it will always be in response to some outrage. But it is worth having a serious discussion about how powerful the governor’s veto is. Should one man or woman have that much power? I don’t care who the governor is, that’s a lot of power for one person to hold. Wisconsinites wisely peeled back the Vanna White veto where the governor could veto individual letters to make new words. Should they take the next step and restrict the line item veto?

IMHO, we should restrict this power. Concentrated power is always dangerous. But this is probably not the time to do it.