Category Archives: Uncategorized

West Bend School District Heading to Referendum

The West Bend School Board is going to start the ball rolling to ask for a referendum next year. They won’t likely admit that, but that is the inevitable outcome of the process they are starting. This is the relevant item on Monday’s School Board agenda:

Topic and Background:

As part of the 17-18 Strategic Plan, the district has committed to evaluating the district’s options to address an aging Jackson Elementary School and the East/West High School facility. To that end, the district has hired Bray Architects to assist in the process.

Public engagement with the process will be crucial. The team is recommending the formation of a board appointed, citizens committee to analyze possible solutions and ultimately make a recommendation back to the board in spring of 2018.

Rationale:

It is extremely important to keep the Board apprised of the activities that are taking place. The formation of the citizens committee is a key component of the plan as we move forward.

Budget:

$35,000 which has already been budgeted for activities related to this strategic plan item.

They have also included a handy document describing the process. You can find that here.

The process is designed to gather public input (good), assess needs (good), and make recommendations to the board (good). The process is also designed to lead to one inevitable conclusion – referendum.

What’s the tell? Look at the firm contracted for the engagement. Bray Architects is a firm that specializes in helping school districts get referendums passed to fund projects that Bray then completes. On their website, they even brag about their role in recent school referendums that passed.

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They even talk about how they helped get referendums passed that had previously failed:

HUDSON MIDDLE SCHOOL

After an unsuccessful referendum with a previous partner, the Hudson School District collaborated with Bray Architects to identify and evaluate potential solutions for the District’s secondary (6th–12th grade) space needs.

Following the completion of the needs analysis and an extensive planning and community engagement process, the School Board placed three referendum questions on the April 2016 ballot. All three questions were approved, including $7.9 million for an addition and renovation to Hudson Middle School. The addition and renovations will focus on grade-level house organization, classroom layout, gymnasium space, educational resource areas, Small Group Instructional rooms, and Special Education learning spaces.

The addition will feature a new gymnasium with one main basketball court and four side courts, two Special Education classrooms, three general-purpose classrooms, and one science classroom. A classroom will be added to an existing “house” on the first floor, while second floor renovations will include improvements to an art classroom and the conversion of an existing space into a science classroom. New lockers will be added to existing “houses” on both floors.

The School Board has contracted with Bray for one purpose and one purpose only – to get a referendum passed. That is the expected outcome of this process. Here is how this has happened in other districts and what we can expect:

  1. Form a committee loaded with people predisposed to support more spending
  2. The committee will conduct a needs analysis that has a very wide definition of “need”
  3. Conduct a propaganda campaign through the committee (so that it appears to be coming from the community) that bemoans all of the facility “needs” (expect to hear about sewage backups in Jackson Elementary again)
  4. The committee will determine that existing district resources are inadequate to meet the facilities “needs”
  5. Conduct a community survey with slanted questions, e.g. “Would you support a referendum to prevent the children having to learn while standing in a foot of sewage?”
  6. The committee recommends that the board go to referendum based on the survey results
  7. The School Board puts the referendum(s) on the ballot

I will be gleefully pleased if I am wrong, but I plan to pull this post back up next year to show how predictable this was.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

Kewaskum mourns loss of community leader Larry Ammel

Neighbors in the Village of Kewaskum are mourning the loss of former Kewaskum High School band teacher and community leader Larry Ammel.

“He was a pillar of the community,” said Jeanne Goeden. “He was the one who organized Music in the Park and people really like that.”

Ammel had retired from the Kewaskum School District years ago but while there he was active in many of the musicals including Fiddler on the Roof.  “He was a very beloved teacher,” Goeden said.

Ammel was also extremely active in Kewaskum Kiwanis, he was the choir director at Peace UCC in Kewaskum and he was involved in the upcoming memorial dedication for Andrea Haberman.

“He used to do beginning band camp at Slinger Middle School,” said West Bend High School Band Director Leah Duckert. “He taught me a lot; he taught me beginning trombone.”

Duckert recalled Ammel’s humor during Friday band camp.

“Trombones are derived from an instrument called a sackbut and Larry brought in these brown paper bags and each kid taped a paper bag to their butt and so then they were all sackbuts. It was hysterical,” she said.

Duckert described Ammel as “jolly.”  “He was the type of guy you wanted to hug every time you saw him,” she said.

Kewaskum Police Chief Tom Bishop said Ammel really gave back to the community. “He will definitely be missed,” said Bishop. “He was a heck of a good guy.”

Funeral services from Larry will be 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 29 at Peace United Church of Christ, 343 First Street, in Kewaskum, with Rev. Eric Kirkegaard officiating. Larry’s family will greet relatives and friends at the church on Friday, April 28 from 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. Visitation will continue at the church on Saturday from 9 a.m. until the time of service. Larry Ammel was 73.

Pipe break forces delayed opening at ION Sports Pub

The owners of ION Sports Pub are asking for the community’s patience as they work through some new issues that have forced them to delay opening by a couple weeks.

Oskar Steinbauer Jr. said he came to the restaurant, 1102 Paradise Drive, this week to find water in the parking lot and some damage inside the building. The new sports pub was supposed to officially open on Monday, April 24 The new official opening will be the first week in May. Steinbauer and his business partner Nora Sanchez will keep the community informed on their progress. A new sign for the restaurant was installed Friday.

Removal of old WB Theatre bridge

The removal of the elevated bridge over the Milwaukee River is underway.  The contractor staging area is on the west side of Veterans Avenue.  The general contractor for this project is West Bend Crane, Inc. from West Bend.

Work will consist of removing the existing bridge over the Milwaukee River.  A crane will be used to move the bridge to the right of way where it will be dismantled and hauled away.

Mass of Dedication at St. Peter Parish on Saturday, April 22

St. Peter Catholic Parish in Slinger will celebrate a Mass of Dedication and Blessing with Archbishop Jerome Listecki at 5 p.m. on April 22 in the newly renovated and expanded church.

The dedication and blessing will consecrate the new newly renovated building as a permanent worship space. Archbishop Listecki will be blessing not only the physical church building and altar, but other items and areas of the church as well.

There will be a reception to follow in St. Peter Church Hall. Please note the usual 8 p.m. Mass will be cancelled Saturday, April 22, 2017. The construction project expanding the original 1892 building began a year ago on February 29, 2016.

The goal to increase church seating capacity has been met, as 740 people can now sit in the main nave, as compared to the original 450 seating capacity. New meeting rooms, an expanded gathering space, and a more spacious church hall and kitchen have also been constructed.

Parishioners are also in the midst of completing a $600,000 furnishing campaign. This campaign will pay for and install all of the church’s stained glass windows and other new furnishing items throughout the building. An open invitation to worship and celebrate Mass is extended to all.

John McGivern to film in neighboring Dodge County

Fans of John McGivern in Washington County are familiar with his PBS show “Around the Corner with John McGivern.” The Emmy award-winning show highlighted West Bend in 2016 and Hartford was featured in 2014.

Now, our neighbors to the west will be featured as McGivern will be filming in Mayville this July. Here’s a note from the Main Street Mayville, Inc.  “We are excited to announce that Milwaukee PBS “Around the Corner with John McGivern” will be filming in Mayville this July. We are seeking interested (and interesting!) parties who may be willing to be filmed and participate in the episode.

Kohlsville Fire Department celebrates gift

Volunteers from the Kohlsville Fire Department gathered under cloudy skies Tuesday afternoon to celebrate a strong donation by neighboring business Spiros Industries.

The locally-run manufacturer donated nearly $10,000 so the fire department could purchase its first jaws of life.

“We’ve always thought about getting one,” said Fire Chief Curt Martin. “Allenton has one and Kewaskum has one but if they’re 10 minutes out we can at least try to rescue a person who may be trapped in a vehicle.”

Spiros Industries recently used the back parking lot at the fire station while its building was undergoing some renovation. As a thank you the company made a generous donation.

“You don’t find a local business that too often does something like that for a volunteer fire department,” Martin said. “It’s amazing what people in the neighborhood do.”

Dennis Backhaus, president of Spiros Industries said they try to do something every year for the firefighters.  “When we’re running out these are the guys who are running in,” he said.

Jim Maronde is a partner at Spiros Industries. “These are really a dedicated bunch of guys,” he said. “We’ve been fortunate in business and we like to help out where ever we can.”

On Tuesday afternoon the Kohlsville Fire Department also showed off its new ambulance. “Our old ambulance was 26 years old and that one we got second hand from Allenton,” said Martin.

The new ambulance is a 2017 E450 Ford custom cab and built by Foster Coach in Illinois. Kohlsville FD ordered the vehicle in December and it just arrived this week.

Foerster Signs in Slinger finished up the signage. The vehicle cost just under $120,000.

Herb Kohl Education Foundation winners

Neighbors in West Bend and Jackson can be proud of Fair Park teacher Renee Wilberg and students Mackenzie Mas from West Bend and Jiexin (Jessica) Yang from Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School in Jackson.

The threesome will be recognized during an awards luncheon, Sunday, April 23 by the Herb Kohl Educational Foundation. The event begins with a reception at noon at Waupun Junior and Senior High School in Waupun. The awards program follows at 1 p.m.

Each year the foundation recognizes students, teachers and principals for their excellence in academics, leadership and high achievement.

Wilberg is one of 100 teachers being awarded $3,000 by the Herb Kohl Education Foundation.

Updates & tidbits

West Bend Friends of Park and Recreation need volunteers for the U.S. Open. “We have been invited to volunteer at the event entrances for checking bags and credentials,” said Lori Yahr. “There will be a 4 hour mandatory training session and you have to commit to working three 8-hour days.” The U.S. Open is June 12 – 18 at Erin Hills in the Town of Erin. Contact Lori Yahr by April 30 at loriyahr@gmail.com

– The annual Kohlsville Fire Department Smoker is Saturday, April 29 in Kohlsville.

-The West Bend American Legion Post 36 will be hosting a brat fry on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 28, 29 and 30 at 1421 W. Washington Street from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Proceeds go to local projects and veterans programs.

– April 28 is the annual Grandparents for Lunch at Holy Angels School in West Bend.

– The DIVA Spring Bling is coming up Thursday, April 27 in downtown West Bend. Proceeds from umbrella and specialty ring sales benefit Chix 4 a Cause.

– On Monday, May 8 there is a free community education forum at the West Bend High School Auditorium featuring internationally recognized researcher of suicide Dr. Thomas Joiner.

– Horicon Bank has stepped up this year to sponsor the fireworks during the July 4th celebration at Riverside Park in West Bend.

-The 30th annual Washington County Breakfast on the Farm is set for Saturday, June 10 at the Golden ‘E’ Dairy Farm on 8262 Orchard Valley Road, in the Town of Farmington.

-The Exclusive Company in West Bend will celebrate Record Store Day on April 22. The day includes sales, free food and live music as the store, 144 N. Main St., celebrates its independence. The store opens for 12 hours of sales from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Celebrating the Day Ladies at McDonald’s in West  

This original story ran in 2014 in Around the Bend by Judy Steffes.  Local McDonald’s owner Steve Kilian and son Steve Jr. took the time to offer a McSurprise to four long-time employees at the Galactic McDonald’s on Main Street after receiving a letter from a customer praising the Day Ladies for their friendly service.

“They call them the Day Ladies and each has worked for Steve Kilian for 20 years or more,” said Sharon Ruplinger, a McDonald’s veteran who started in 1973 when she was a 15-year-old sophomore at West Bend East High School.

“I was there when the special sauce for the Big Mac was mixed at the store and when the Hamburgler crawl thing, bouncy fry girls and metal slides were in the outdoor play land,” Ruplinger said recalling how they had to shut down the play area when it was “real hot because kids would burn their legs.”

As a teen Ruplinger had to know all the prices and the tax table, add by hand on a piece of paper, and cook by sight – not by computer. Ruplinger now works as Steve Kilian’s assistant and local marketing manager.

She said the Day Ladies have similar stories; they’re a unique group recognized by customers for their courtesy, commitment, and familiarity.

“I think we enjoy the customers as much as they enjoy us,” said Vicki Montanez, a Day Lady and an employee since Aug. 1, 1990.

“I was 36 when I started and the menu was really basic, we made all the biscuits for breakfast by hand and we had to bake and frost the cinnamelts ourselves and now it’s all done ahead of time.”

Montanez, who previously sold real estate, gravitated to McDonald’s because of the fast-paced environment but found she loved it for the flexible schedule. “It was really good because if my kids got sick at school I was able to leave in a second and that was really important,” she said.

Customers know the Day Ladies by name, they know their families, and many times their days off.

“You have the same people that come each day, some we know by name and others we know by order,” said Karen Wentz who knows a regular customer simply as ‘large coffee, seven cream, seven sugar.’

Wentz started in January 1997, when she was 33. She worked during the era when McDonald’s would bring breakfast to the high schools serving pancakes, cinnamon rolls, and egg McMuffins.

“We’d set up in one of the cafeterias and the kids just loved it,” she said.

Day Lady Caroline Schwartz started at McDonald’s in 1988 when the uniforms were baby blue with polyester pants and a blue striped button-up top. “I started because all my friends worked here,” she said. “I’ve stayed 25 years because it fit my schedule and the Kilians treated me like family.”

Schwartz talked about working alongside Steve Jr. when he was 12 years old and the appreciation shown by the owner.

“Steve sent us to the Packer game with a chauffeur and then they took us out to lunch at the Ninja Japanese Steakhouse; just so nice,” she said about Kilian who bought his first McDonald’s in West Bend in 1990.

Jane Sterr has been with McDonald’s since May 2, 1981. “I was 18, at West Bend East High School and the restaurant was across the street where Auto Zone is now,” she said. “We had a one-window drive thru and the popular sandwich was the McLean Deluxe.”

Camaraderie and customer service are reasons Sterr has stayed for 33 years. “We have our very regular customers and we joke around; we can still work while having fun. It’s a very good atmosphere,” she said.

Customer Judy Essig brought Jane a gift for her anniversary last year. Questioned about the longevity of the Day Ladies she said, “It speaks highly for the employer and the way they’re treated.”

Sterr admitted, she never thought she’d be at McDonald’s this long. “It’s hard work but we all work well together, we get along, and it’s amazing because we’re just dedicated.”

Route 60 Reliever Route to be Discussed Tuesday

This debate is heating up again.

Washington County Administrator Joshua Shoemann, tells FOX6 News at the request of the Hartford Area Development Cooperation, the county is once again revisiting the possibility of adding a reliever route to Highway 60.

“The county board asked us to take a look at where the best route was. It happened to be right here on Highway K through the unincorporated Town of St. Lawrence,” said Schoemann.

The request was made in 2016, but it’s been brought up time and time again since the 70s. The proposal is to build a new road to ease congestion. That has many worried it could risk the future of area landmarks, like the Little Red Inn restaurant.

“I get asked constantly about this project; there is a lot of concern if the building is going to stay here. It’s very historical to customers and important to them,” said Little Red Inn Manager, Miranda Stewart.

Even more concerned are farmers who fear the project could take away acres of their land.

“It’s a very big deal. There’s no land around, we are close to the city and it’s all developed. We need land and it’s just not around here,” said Curtiss Becker, Becker Dale Farms.

[…]

A listening meeting is happening Tuesday, January 31st at 6:30 p.m. inside Hartford Town Hall, where there will be opportunity for public comment.

The argument is basically this… Hartford’s industrial park and commercial center lies on the west side of town. This required the businesses there, and pass-through traffic, to run their trucks through the middle of Hartford on Highway 60 to get to Interstate 41. This creates noise and congestion in the city and delays and frustration for the drivers. To relieve this, some folks want a reliever route around the north side of town. Essentially, it would be a partial loop with free traffic flow between the interstate and the west side of town.

The downside is two-fold. First, the reliever route would require the purchase and destruction of farmland and homes. Second, the reliever route would be expensive. The State of Wisconsin has already rejected the project, so Washington County taxpayers would foot the bill if the project moves ahead.

Overall, I think the return for this project is exceedingly dubious. Some of the proponents argue that the reliever route will spur economic development. I’m skeptical about that claim. If access to the interstate is the driver for economic development, then there are still plenty of open areas with ready access to I-41 and within a convenient drive from Hartford, Slinger, Jackson, Germantown, and other communities in Washington County. If the County is looking for a place to spur development, an expensive highway project to funnel activity to the west side of Hartford seems like a poor use of taxpayer resources.

Saudi Arabia Threatens US Over 9/11 Bill

People seem to forget that our extraordinary debt puts our nation at risk from actions like this.

(CNN)Saudi Arabia is warning it will sell off billions in American assets if the U.S. Congress passes a bipartisan bill that would allow victims of 9/11 and other terrorist attacks to sue foreign governments.
Saudi foreign minister Adel al-Jubeir issued the warning to U.S. lawmakers last month during a visit to Washington, two senior State Department officials told CNN. A source with knowledge of the Saudis’ thinking said investments would be put in jeopardy if this bill passes, so they are trying to protect themselves from risk.

Around the Bend by Judy Steffes

This week’s edition…

New restaurant in the works for West Bend

Tochi is the name of a new restaurant exploring its options in West Bend. It’s still “very early” in the process according to chef and owner Gregg DesRosier. Tochi, a ramen noodle restaurant, currently has a location in the Milwaukee area.

If DesRosier’s name sounds familiar that’s because he opened one of his first restaurants years ago (2002-2007) in West Bend. Muddy’s on Main, 111 S. Main St., was a Cajun restaurant that was in the current location for Cafe Soeurette. DesRosier has signed a lease on a commercial property in West Bend. Adam Williquette with Anderson Commercial Group locked down the lease.

Albrecht Clinic moving to Highway 33

Albrecht Free Clinic in West Bend moving to Highway 33: The Albrecht Free Clinic is relocating from its home on Oak Street in the lower level of Spaulding Clinical to the former Verre Young Eye Clinic, 908 W. Washington Street.

“It was one of those things where, we’re never sure where we’re going to be,” Jim Strachota, executive director of the Albrecht Free Clinic said. “We’ve been in existence 19 years and have never actually owned a property; we’ve just been lease to lease.”

Since its inception in 1996 the Albrecht Free Clinic has moved to several locations and lived from short-term lease to short-term lease.

The clinic has been on Oak Street since 2010 and earlier this year as Strachota was set to approach Spaulding Clinical CEO Randy Spaulding for a long-term agreement Spaulding notified the Albrecht Clinic that its space was needed for expansion.

“This came as a surprise to both the board and myself as we were preparing to start renovation for dental services,” Strachota said. “Fortunately the stars were aligned and the spirit of Dr. Albrecht directed us to a new site. Not only was this property currently available but for sale at a price we could afford.”

On June 18 an offer to purchase the property on W. Washington Street was accepted. “For the first time in our 19-year history, we have a place we can call our own,” Strachota said. “This location really fits our need and if everything goes according to plan we will have three full medical rooms and three full dental rooms.”

Strachota said the location of the building “will really be ideal” because W. Washington Street has a high-visibility factor. “It just really feels good and the size fits the community need,” he said of the 3,000-square-foot building. The timeline on the move is expected to be late fall as an interior renovation is expected to get underway in the coming weeks.

Rising Phoenix Organic Market prepping to open in West Bend:

The shelving is in, the product is in place and final touches are being put on the new Rising Phoenix Organic Market, 830 S. Main St. The store, in the West Bend Plaza, formerly home to Jacci & Sons. Joy Durbin is owner of the independent market. “This is our first store,” she said. “I’ve lived in West Bend for six years and there’s a need in this community for a health food store.

Rising Phoenix will carry Herbal Symphony products including smoothie powders, protein powders, spices, teas, organic grocery, raw and frozen foods. “In the next few months we’ll also be opening an organic smoothie bar,” Durbin said.

West Bend has seen its fair share of health food stores. Most neighbors remember Sunseed Natural Foods, 1015 S. Main Street. Owner Debbie Lewis closed in December 2010. Karen’s Energy – Nature’s Garden Health & Wellness Center, later opened, 1427 W. Washington St. in March 2013. That store recently went out of business after owner Karen Urbanek moved to Utah.

Settler’s Park Market was in downtown West Bend for several years. Owner Betty Jo Kiefert opened the local health-food store, 152 N. Main St. in June 2013. Kiefert carried bulk items and dry goods along with spices, cheese, herbs, supplements and vitamin. Kiefert closed in 2014.

Durbin has been keeping her door open while setting up. “People have stopped by and poked their head,” she said. “Some former customers have come in and we’ve talked to our neighbor En Fuego and they’re excited about our smoothie bar; we’ll also be doing health classes.” Rising Phoenix Organic Market is expected to open in August.

New used car dealership to open on Highway 33

Leitheiser Car Company to open a second location on Highway 33: Tim Leitheiser is opening another car dealership in West Bend. Leitheiser is going to lease the front building space from Lee Stehling at Ace Canvas, 3424 W. Washington Street. The front potion of the building is formerly home to Ace Auto Trim; that business closed in May.

“I have been looking for years and I liked being on Highway 33 and I thought I’d give it a shot,” said Leitheiser. “There’s a lot of traffic in that area.” Leitheiser operated on Highway 33 for a couple months last year when Highway P was under construction and he couldn’t use his current location.

Leitheiser applied this week for a rezoning permit; that will be taken up by the Plan Commission in August. “Once they rezone it we’re good to go,” he said. Leitheiser plans on hiring a sales man for the new store. He said the lot will hold about 25 cars. Leitheiser Auto has been on Highway P for 17 years. He will continue to operate out of that location as well; the dealership on Highway 33 is a new venture.

West Bend doctor makes ESPN and Sports Illustrated

Dr. Chad Tamez, a family practice physician at Froedtert-West Bend Clinic, was one of the first people on scene Monday when a woman in the stands at the Brewers vs. Braves game got hit in the face with a line drive. Tamez was working as the fan doctor for Froedtert when the woman was hit in the top of the ninth inning.

Dr. Tamez attended to her medical needs. The woman was eventually taken from her seat with medical personnel at her side. Tamez finished his shift and went home, but over the past two days he’s received his 15 minutes of fame as ESPN and Sports Illustrated featured the incident and Tamez happened to be in the shot.

Those photos of Tamez coming to the woman’s aid have been seen on websites across the country. “A little excitement in our little world,” said Marcia Tamez. “I’m not sure how the woman is. I think Chad knows but isn’t allowed to say because of HIPPA.”

In the physician directory at Froedtert, Tamez said he takes pride in serving people in the community. “I enjoy caring for entire families and developing a lasting relationship built on trust, respect, and compassion to individual situations. I take pride in my community, having been raised in West Bend, and am very pleased to be able to offer my services to the people and the places I have called home my whole life. ”

Tour de Fox in West Bend

The Tour de Fox makes a stop in West Bend Monday as Sam Fox, 28, is biking, running and climbing for 33 days straight in an effort to raise $1 million for Parkinson’s research. Fox is an extreme athlete. During his tour he’s climbing the highest peaks in each of the lower 48 states. The effort was organized through the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

“It’s a 14,000 mile journey in three months,” Fox said. “I have about 3,000 miles on the bike and I have about 70 days left to go.” On Monday afternoon the 6-foot-3 Fox was hosted by George and Judi Prescott who hosted a fundraising picnic. The Prescotts have been actively involved in Parkinson’s research ever since he was diagnosed more than 12 years ago with the disorder that attacks the nervous system. So far, Fox has raised close to $570,000 of his $1 million goal.

Library update

Delta Defense has stepped up to take care of maintenance at Patrons Park, the new park behind the West Bend Community Memorial Library. A sign is currently in place at the northern entrance of the park showing support by Delta Defense. “The agreement came about a year ago,” said Chris Jenkins, Dist. 4 alderman and former Library Board president. “I reached out to Delta Defense owner and CEO Tim Schmidt for help and he graciously agreed.”

The agreement with Delta Defense began once the landscaping was complete and a sprinkler system installed at Patrons Park.

Updates & tidbits

A note of thanks from Michael Christian who organized the “Homegrown- A locally farmed musicians festival.” Over 300 people attended the June 27 event in Regner Park and $3,600 was raised for the Washington County Historical Society and performers at the West Bend Farmers Market.

-All In Books Used Bookstore is moving to 136 N. Main St. in downtown West Bend, the former location of Ruth-Anne’s Gourmet Market. Store owner Betty Bartelt said will be opening August 5. As Bartelt prepares to move she is having a buy one get one free sale at the current location 910 S. Main St. The store on S. Main will close July 25.

– Former Slinger High School band teacher Dave Hanke had a book published a little over a year ago. “Teaching the Dream” is Hanke’s journey in music that covered more than two generations. A review by Dr. James Nelsen reads, “Hanke does not offer any single, miraculous recommendation in “Teaching the Dream”. Rather, he makes it clear that great teachers employ a variety of techniques to motivate, encourage, and inspire their students.” Hanke’s book can be purchased directly from www.reallygoodmusic.com The cost of the book is $25.

– Ron Larson has resigned as president of the West Bend East High School Booster Club.

-Crews are working the next month to repaint the water tower on Summit Avenue. Crews had been prepping the tower over the past few weeks. Initially there were beams sticking out of the side of the round tank which made it look almost alien like. Now a giant nylon screen up can be seen draped over the 300,000-gallon water tower to keep sandblasted paint from falling on cars and homes below.

-Success for Kick Some Ash held this week at Koehn & Koehn Jewelers. “The turnout was more than we expected,” organizer Jenn Dempsey-Koehn said. “Unbelievably cool watching the community come together to help fix a problem” Over 300 people visited the jewelry store on W. Washington Street. Local celebrities worked as clerks behind the counter. A portion of the sale went to the West Bend Park, Rec and Forestry Department to help pay to replace the 3,000 trees removed because of Emerald Ash Borer. “I’m proud to say that we raised $5,000 which equals roughly 20 trees,” Dempsey-Koehn said.

-A single-bay car wash at the Shell station on Paradise Drive was approved by the West Bend Plan Commission this week. The Osowski family owns the station. The car wash will have “the newest technology.” It will be both touch less and soft touch. The customer will choose the type of service at the carwash kiosk. On a history note: Paradise Drive used to be home to Paradise Auto Wash. Owner Doug Pesch had a five-bay car wash at 715 W. Paradise Drive. Pesch bought the property in 1996 with a couple other partners and sold the house and garage on the property for $1. That house was moved to Alpine Road and later that year Pesch built the five-bay carwash. In 2013 Associated Bank bought the property for $1.15 million.

– Keith Novotny, owner of Cousins Subs on Paradise Drive in West Bend, is donating 15 percent of his proceeds during a sale from 3 p.m. – 9 p.m. on July 14 to help the Dove sisters. They are from West Bend and have a long battle fighting Leukemia.

The West Bend High School Drumline will perform August 7 at the Wisconsin State Fair.

-Summer Yoga Jam begins Saturday, July 18 at Regner Park. It’s part of the Youth Programs at the West Bend Park & Rec Department.

Remember Lightning?

Today’s 1964 history photo comes from Joel Hausmann of West Bend. His father, Vince Hausmann, sent a photo of his neighbor’s horse ‘Lightning’ to Channel 6 in Milwaukee. Hausmann was trying to garner a little publicity for the animal. He received a response from Channel 6 promotions manager Conrad Kaminski.

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Judge Rules Wisconsin’s Abortion Rule as Unconstitutional

Not surprising. Hopefully this will be appealed.

In his ruling, Conley wrote that the “marginal benefit to women’s health” by requiring hospital admitting privileges “is substantially outweighed by the burden this requirement will have on women’s health outcomes due to restricted access to abortions in Wisconsin.”

“While the court agrees with the State that sometimes it is necessary to reduce access to insure safety, this is decidedly not one of those instances,” Conley wrote. “In particular, the State has failed to meet its burden of demonstrating through credible evidence a link between the admitting privileges requirement and a legitimate health interest.”

I was a bit sickened by this quote…

“We all want to protect patient safety — this law doesn’t do that, as the court recognized,” said Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin CEO Teri Huyck.

Unless, of course, you are a baby. In that case, there is no place less safe than one of their clinics.

Creepy Jeff Goldblum Ad

Burke Wants to Repeal Voter ID

Excellent. This is an issue where two-thirds of the people support voter ID. She should make this a major campaign plank.

MADISON, Wis. – Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke supports repealing the requirement that voters present photo identification at the polls.

Municipal Spending Down

Good.

The Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance issued two reports this week, one showing municipal spending per capita declined 3 percent as Walker’s public union reforms and first state budget took effect, and the other measuring the state’s business climate.

According to the group’s annual MunicipalFacts report, cities and villages with at least 2,000 residents spent on average $823 per capita in 2012, down from $848 the year before. Per capita spending grew 2.2 percent on average in the previous six years. Spending dipped 1 percent in 2009, which was the first decline in more than a decade.

Curt Witynski, assistant director of the League of Wisconsin Municipalities, chalked up the reduction to a combination of factors, including “good management of public dollars by municipal elected officials, Act 10, strict levy limits and several other changes included in Gov. Walker’s first budget, such as the repeal of language requiring municipalities to maintain certain minimum spending thresholds on libraries, police and fire protection” and “the reduction in shared revenue and other intergovernmental programs like transportation aids.”